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Georgia Senate Passes 'todd Gurley' Bill That Enables Jail Time For Paying College Players.


SacFalcFan
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Good. Too bad they can't make it retroactive to 2012 or so. I still hope to see a news report about that guy getting his jaw shattered and left for dead somewhere. F*** that guy.

How on earth can this be constitutional . . .

:lol: This country, both it's leaders and citizens, completely stopped caring about that around 7 years ago...

TBH, the NCAA is almost certainly violating the player's constitutional rights simply by disallowing them to get paid at all. The leadership in this country hasn't cared about that (or the 10,000 other ways they violate our constitutional rights every single day...traffic cops? GTFOH.) since it's inception though, so I highly doubt they'll suddenly get all up in arms about something as meangingless, to them at least, as violating some constitutional "rights".

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Our constitutional rights have been trampled for the last 50 years. 7 years? Ha.

It was 7 years ago that the citizenry joined the lawmakers in openly having nothing but derision regarding the Constition.

Edited by Nicolae
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very happy they passed this bill.. it's either going to stop someone from trying to get one of our instate kids to break ncaa rules or if they do it will keep a moron like that gator fan quiet knowing he will go to jail. win win.

Yeah, I don't even care if it is a UGA player or not, that is some lowdown, scumbag bs he pulled on Gurley. I mean, I've joked about people doing that kind of thing before, but it was always a joke because most people understand that it is a despicable, petulant thing to do and that fans are not supposed to inject themselves into the game like that.

This guy is that one turd that can't grasp sarcasm and thought he would be every UF fan's hero for doing this. I hope he is out of business, cannot secure any loans to get it up and running again, and is otherwise unemployable as well, in any capacity. Anything I say about getting violent on him is just hyperbole, but I really hope he ends up homeless and living under a bridge cold and alone. That is still too good for that guy.

Edited by Nicolae
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Yeah, I don't even care if it is a UGA player or not, that is some lowdown, scumbag bs he pulled on Gurley. I mean, I've joked about people doing that kind of thing before, but it was always a joke because most people understand that it is a despicable, petulant thing to do and that fans are not supposed to inject themselves into the game like that.

This guy is that one turd that can't grasp sarcasm and thought he would be every UF fan's hero for doing this. I hope he is out of business, cannot secure any loans to get it up and running again, and is otherwise unemployable as well, in any capacity. Anything I say about getting violent on him is just hyperbole, but I really hope he ends up homeless and living under a bridge cold and alone. That is still too good for that guy.

The problem I have with this is they just criminalized a previously legal business transaction. I imagine sports memorabilia dealers don't have much, if any, lobbying presence in Atlanta, otherwise this never would have passed. Instead, you have a legislature full of UGA fans trying to protect their beloved football team.

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I'm sorry, these young men know what they subject themselves to by accepting money. Putting the onus on businessmen for doing what the NCAA should already be doing is bass awkwards.

Gurley ADMITTED he knew it was wrong,, he knew the rules, but he did it anyways. And you're going to prosecute the other side of that arms-length business transaction?

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I unlike most UGA fans was more upset with Gurley when the news broke. He knew what AJ Green went through and still decided to risk eligibility. The dealer was a POS for exposing it but he never should've had the opportunity. I just can't agree with making businessmen criminals for something like this. The NCAA is the dang criminals not being demonized.

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Gurley ADMITTED he knew it was wrong,, he knew the rules, but he did it anyways. And you're going to prosecute the other side of that arms-length business transaction?

So you sit here and tell me how wrong it is and how wrong Gurley knew it was...and then argue that one side of the people perpetrating this act should not be punished at all when Gurley had his college career ruined due to that dealer's petulance? That Gurley should be villified while this POS gets to walk away scott-free? He knew it was every bit as wrong as Gurley did, but it shouldn't matter for him? That is your position?

You won't find much traction with me with that argument.

Edited by Nicolae
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I unlike most UGA fans was more upset with Gurley when the news broke. He knew what AJ Green went through and still decided to risk eligibility. The dealer was a POS for exposing it but he never should've had the opportunity. I just can't agree with making businessmen criminals for something like this. The NCAA is the dang criminals not being demonized.

The man is a low down, dirty f***ing scumbag piece of white trash. He already was a criminal, this wouldn't change that, just add one more piece of evidence.

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I unlike most UGA fans was more upset with Gurley when the news broke. He knew what AJ Green went through and still decided to risk eligibility. The dealer was a POS for exposing it but he never should've had the opportunity. I just can't agree with making businessmen criminals for something like this. The NCAA is the dang criminals not being demonized.

So you sit here and tell me how wrong it is and how wrong Gurley knew it was...and then argue that one side of the people perpetrating this act should not be punished at all when Gurley had his college career ruined due to that dealer's petulance? That Gurley should be villified while this POS gets to walk away scott-free? He knew it was every bit as wrong as Gurley did, but it shouldn't matter for him? That is your position?

You won't find much traction with me with that argument.

What he did to Gurley was very wrong, but I don't think he should face criminal punishment for it. Regardless of his intent, he entered into a voluntary, arms-length agreement with Gurley for the sale of autographs. Autographing memorabilia is a wholly legal transaction in and of itself. If Matt Ryan autographed items for that guy, it's legal, but if Chubb autographs items for that guy, he's going to face criminal prosecution?

I cannot, and will not support that. I am embarrassed by our legislature.

Now, I absolutely support Gurley and/or UGA's bringing of a civil action against that guy, but criminal prosecution for a legal transaction? Nope.

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What he did to Gurley was very wrong, but I don't think he should face criminal punishment for it. Regardless of his intent, he entered into a voluntary, arms-length agreement with Gurley for the sale of autographs. Autographing memorabilia is a wholly legal transaction in and of itself. If Matt Ryan autographed items for that guy, it's legal, but if Chubb autographs items for that guy, he's going to face criminal prosecution?

I cannot, and will not support that. I am embarrassed by our legislature.

Now, I absolutely support Gurley and/or UGA's bringing of a civil action against that guy, but criminal prosecution for a legal transaction? Nope.

I guess one counterpoint to my argument is that cigarettes and alcohol can be legally sold to adults, while it is a crime to sell them to minors. A legal transaction, in and of itself, can be made illegal when a certain class of people are involved in the transaction.

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What he did to Gurley was very wrong, but I don't think he should face criminal punishment for it. Regardless of his intent, he entered into a voluntary, arms-length agreement with Gurley for the sale of autographs. Autographing memorabilia is a wholly legal transaction in and of itself. If Matt Ryan autographed items for that guy, it's legal, but if Chubb autographs items for that guy, he's going to face criminal prosecution?

I cannot, and will not support that. I am embarrassed by our legislature.

Now, I absolutely support Gurley and/or UGA's bringing of a civil action against that guy, but criminal prosecution for a legal transaction? Nope.

Ok, I can get on board with that. I would want the punishment at most to be something along the lines of a fine, but if they simply passed a law that would leave the dealers wide open to civil liability and have them in a very difficult to defend position, that would probably be an even better outcome.

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Ok, I can get on board with that. I would want the punishment at most to be something along the lines of a fine, but if they simply passed a law that would leave the dealers wide open to civil liability and have them in a very difficult to defend position, that would probably be an even better outcome.

If, as a part of a criminal sentence, he was ordered to pay a fine and/or restitution, he would be able to pay it as he was able to do so.

A civil judgment? They could garnish his wages and do all sorts of other unpleasant things to collect the judgment.

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I guess one counterpoint to my argument is that cigarettes and alcohol can be legally sold to adults, while it is a crime to sell them to minors. A legal transaction, in and of itself, can be made illegal when a certain class of people are involved in the transaction.

you are correct and i was going to reply with that. however you did it for me. i personally would have them be tarred and feathered in public like they did back in the day. that would be a great deterrent. then have them beaten with a rod. then fine them. i don't believe we will see anymore guys trying to get these young players to violated their ncaa agreements. everything would be public so that their shame could be seen by all.

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you are correct and i was going to reply with that. however you did it for me. i personally would have them be tarred and feathered in public like they did back in the day. that would be a great deterrent. then have them beaten with a rod. then fine them. i don't believe we will see anymore guys trying to get these young players to violated their ncaa agreements. everything would be public so that their shame could be seen by all.

If we brought back old punishments i think a lot of crime would be deterred.

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