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Comcast To Roll Out The Fastest Internet Service In The Country In An Area That Has Competition.


GEORGIAfan
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http://www.theverge.com/2015/4/2/8330267/comcast-2gbps-gigabit-pro-broadband

One way to answer critics and competitors alike is to simply do better, and for once Comcast is doing exactly that. The US cable giant is today announcing a new 2Gbps broadband service, which it will start rolling out in Atlanta from next month. There's no price yet, but Comcast says it will be symmetrical meaning you'll upload just as quickly as you can download and it won't be limited "just to certain neighborhoods."

BRINGING FIBER RIGHT TO YOUR HOME

Doug Guthrie, Senior VP of Comcast Cables South Region, explains that the company's "approach is to offer the most comprehensive rollout of multi-gigabit service to the most homes as quickly as possible." That's in stark contrast to what Comcast was saying just a couple of years ago, when it dismissed Google's Fiber efforts as being excessive for most people's needs.

To get connected, you'll need to be "within close proximity" of Comcast's fiber network and accept the installation of "professional-grade" equipment. That should hint at the likely high cost of Comcast's new offering, which can be interpreted as a residential extension of the multi-gigabit service that it already offers to businesses across the United States.

Comcast plans to expand to other cities beyond Atlanta and will cover as many as 18 million American homes by the end of 2015. For much broader gigabit coverage, the company also says it's working on a 1Gbps service matching the speed of Google Fiber for 2016, which it says will be able to connect "almost every customer in our footprint."

So Google Fiber announces Atlanta as a city to receive 1Gbps Fiber and now Uverse goes from a max of 24Mbps in the city to 1Gbps and Comcast goes from a respectable 300Mbps to 2Gbps service.

sidenote: I wonder if this means more startup companies will pick atlanta as a possible headquarters.

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Which is my second question. What is the residential applications to this? Is it like a Ferrari? The speed is there, but you almost never will get to use all of it?

S.treaming man, Netflix, VUDU, Amazon. I use them right now. Think about any TV in the house streaming from any one of them, AND people in the house downloading\listening to music on the 'net. All of that at the same time without buffering.

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S.treaming man, Netflix, VUDU, Amazon. I use them right now. Think about any TV in the house streaming from any one of them, AND people in the house downloading\listening to music on the 'net. All of that at the same time without buffering.

I have 60 MPs with charter and had 30ish with comcast. I've never had any problems. I can play ps3 online while streaming the hawks game on my laptop. I'm all for getting the best, but at some point aren't you paying for more than you can possibly use?

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I have 60 MPs with charter and had 30ish with comcast. I've never had any problems. I can play ps3 online while streaming the hawks game on my laptop. I'm all for getting the best, but at some point aren't you paying for more than you can possibly use?

You live alone don't you? I'm not saying that to belittle you or anything, but if you have a four or more person household with many different simultaneous streams going on it can get to be a problem. Would you still be ok with 30 when you're playing your PS3 adn streaming the Hawks game, you spouse is streaming House of Cards and surfing on the iPad, your daughter is streaming music videos and chatting via Facetime over Wi-Fi, and your son is playing whatever FPS du jour?

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You live alone don't you? I'm not saying that to belittle you or anything, but if you have a four or more person household with many different simultaneous streams going on it can get to be a problem. Would you still be ok with 30 when you're playing your PS3 adn streaming the Hawks game, you spouse is streaming House of Cards and surfing on the iPad, your daughter is streaming music videos and chatting via Facetime over Wi-Fi, and your son is playing whatever FPS du jour?

True. It's more than just speed, it's capacity too.

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You live alone don't you? I'm not saying that to belittle you or anything, but if you have a four or more person household with many different simultaneous streams going on it can get to be a problem. Would you still be ok with 30 when you're playing your PS3 adn streaming the Hawks game, you spouse is streaming House of Cards and surfing on the iPad, your daughter is streaming music videos and chatting via Facetime over Wi-Fi, and your son is playing whatever FPS du jour?

All very true. But there's gotta be some middle ground between a nice BMW and a Formula 1 race car right? Lol.

Even at these speeds, I expect it to cost so much that most families won't even try to afford it.

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Which is my second question. What is the residential applications to this? Is it like a Ferrari? The speed is there, but you almost never will get to use all of it?

I think this is being short sighted. We have no clue what the future holds. Before the iPhone, i do not believe anyone was the smartphone explosion happening. I also do not think the creators of the internet thought it would be a place where we needed privacy. The point of the internet was that you trusted the computer you were trying to talk to and that you were only sending text files back and forth. No one could have guessed that we would be doing business transactions as well watching Videos and streaming videos.

I do not think we will ever need 1Gbps speeds, but I do think major city areas getting these speeds means that faster speeds will trickle down to rural areas by way of possibly recycling much of the material they replace by putting in fiber. I think Fiber is more important for businesses than residential, but these type of speeds could foster new startups and entrepreneurs to build more businesses.

How does uverse survive? Everyone I know says its god awful and slow. I've had comast and charter and both have been faster than I need.

Some people would rather deal with Att over Comcast. Others have been customers for a long time and are just not switching and some are just stuck with Att as their only option for high speed internet. Also the margins are stupid high on these services and they really only need to pay for maintenance in areas that do not have to deal with competition from google fiber. Uverse is still using the same lines that they were forced to put in for telephone. I believe only the backend of Uverse is actually fiber.

I know in Japan, they offer DSL with speeds up to 50Mbps and that is stuff they were able to offer over the old lines back in 2004. In 99 ,Softbank(Sprint's parent company) was offering 12Mbps, so the technology for this stuff has been around long enough for Att to get it on the cheap, when it upgraded its systems to Uverse.

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This magically happening is hilarious. They were sitting on this... Just to not do it. Pretty sad

+10000. this is what I read a few months ago Google Fiber unleashing its services. And I heard Obama was helping out Google fiber to do so, so they could get this companies to quit with holding from its clients and to also make the cost very very reasonable to its clients.

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Also wanted to add that a lot of major companies are talking about the internet of things(IoT), which is the idea that in the future that every piece of technology will be connected to the internet. We already have TVs being connected to the internet. Nest proved that people wanted internet connected thermostats and Dropcam proved that people were willing to pay for IP based cameras in their home. I believe even some garage doors are connected to the internet already. Maybe next is ovens, fridges, cars, or door locks. That many devices connected to the internet is going to require lots of bandwidth. I also think we could see people move away from lossy/compressed media to lossless media. With 2Gbps internet, we could see bluray quality movies from netflix and iTunes could offer films in Raw format or spotify offering FLAC quality music by default.

This magically happening is hilarious. They were sitting on this... Just to not do it. Pretty sad

Competition is an amazing thing in the market place. It just takes on company willing to make the change. In Japan, they have 3 major cellular carriers, but one of them(Softbank) started to innovate and decided to offer crazy low prices and bundles. They also did the same thing for DSL by offering 12Mbps DSL for roughly 30bucks back in the early 2000.

Look at what a revitalized Tmobile has been able to do. Now on prepaid, you can get unlimited talk/text + 5Gbps of data on Att's network for 45 bucks though cricket. You can get similar prepaid offerings from most other prepaid providers with less data. Even postpaid plans are offering more and more data for the price with unlimited talk and text. Both Tmobile is has stated that they are going to cover 1.6 million sq miles of the US, which will cover 300Million POPs. Sprint has their own plan to expand their coverage. Not sure how many they will cover, but I doubt they would let Tmobile pass them in coverage, so we could have 4 national carriers covering 300 million people.

Wireline just does not have anyone of the major players willing to turn on each other to get more revenue by reducing price/offering faster speeds. All the cable companies have basically cut up the US so they each get major cities and do not compete with each other. They have also prevented cities from building their own networks by getting states to make laws preventing as much. They also prevent new comers from really being disruptive by charing crazy prices for pole access. When a competitor comes into the market, they are going to change, because 40-50% margin is better than 97% with no customers.

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Well I'm certainly glad Goggle Fiber has spawned some competition in the ATL area. This is been a Comcast monopoly for a long time and it's no surprise they hit our area with these stupid 300GB caps. Suck I live in the Burbs that are not the primary target for Google Fiber or these Comncast upgrade but if somehow I could just get rid of this **** 300GB monthly cap it would make my life alot better. So silly Comcast was sitting on this and only came out until Google put pressure on them. The GOP cries that competition is bad is seriously mis guided and goes against reality.

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Which is my second question. What is the residential applications to this? Is it like a Ferrari? The speed is there, but you almost never will get to use all of it?

Right now for me it's not the speed I'm fine with my current 100MBPS connection it is getting rid of the 300GB cap that hampers my families ability to really utilize our connection. If this competition can cause Comcast to drop the cap then that is a win for me.

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This isn't really fiber cable, but when are we gonna see a boost in mobile speed? We got to 4GLTE quite a while ago and it just kinda stopped.

Google Tower Cloud and Atlanta.That is a huge project going on right now.

How does uverse survive? Everyone I know says its god awful and slow. I've had comast and charter and both have been faster than I need.

AT&T was performing huge upgrades in 4 cities in Ga but they shut them down after Net neutrality came up.From what I could tell it seemed to be more focused on industrial areas.In the last month they've been doing the same thing again but in residential areas this time.

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All very true. But there's gotta be some middle ground between a nice BMW and a Formula 1 race car right? Lol.

Even at these speeds, I expect it to cost so much that most families won't even try to afford it.

There is no middle ground, just as there is no middle ground between driving to LA and flying to LA.
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Train.

Things that aren't the middle ground. Currently a train takes almost 3 days from NY to LA. High speed rail might make it quicker, but would cost hundreds of billions, if not more.

There is no real technology middle ground here. The next step is to fiber. It's already there in most metro areas, it isn't cost prohibitive either.

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This isn't really fiber cable, but when are we gonna see a boost in mobile speed? We got to 4GLTE quite a while ago and it just kinda stopped.

Meh, I am sure it is based on docisis 3.1, but that is really semantics for this discussion. No one really cares what the underlying technology is, but that the speeds are similar to that of what people expect from Fiber.

I do not think we need to see boosts in mobile speeds. I mean how much speed do you really need from you phone? Everything is already compressed to the max, plus we have decent data caps. I think the speeds we get currently are fine until they release the specs for 5G or some sort of explosion requires more data. Netflix 4K at home requires a 15Mbps connection, so anything more than 15Mbps on your phone is really just a pissing contest.

Also most carriers are already releasing faster speeds. Verizon's XLTE and Tmobile's wideband are capable of a theoretical speed of 150Mbps. They could increase that to 300Mbps, but most phones will not be able to handle 4x4 antennas. Every carrier is releasing wider pipes as well as densifying/ increasing capacity, but we are consuming it faster than they can release it. They also have quite a bit of their spectrum locked into 3G technology, which prevents then from adding more LTE capacity.

Sprint is launching their Spark LTE network, which they plan on offering 1Gbps speeds, because they have so much spectrum in the 2.5Ghz band. They just do not have enough capacity at each cell tower to be able to handle that much speed. They would need at least a 3Gbps pipe to that tower to handle the Spark LTE, but then you need enough speed to handle their 3G and non spark LTE networks.

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