The Shotfather

The Movie Thread

448 posts in this topic

It is funny however that in a movie that is partially going to be set in Spain during the Inquisition that there has yet to be a single Spanish or even Latin person cast.

You've got a German lead actor, a French lead actress, and an Englishman and Irishman as co-stars.

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It is a little older but I finally got around to watching all of Lincoln. Overall it was a good movie and pretty accurate for Hollywood standards. The cast was fantastic,

Daniel Day Lewis >>>>>>>>>>>

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Just watched Fury. **** good war movie. Good performance by the Bouf, and Brad Pitt was great as always.

Shia Labeouf is an incredible actor. If he wasn't such a gigantic shitgoon he'd be one of the most sought after guys in Hollywood right now. Charlie Countryman is a pretty great movie if you can find it, not sure if it's still on Netflix, but that's where I saw it.

Speaking of Netflix, I checked out Cary Fukunaga's Beasts of No Nation and enjoyed the first half of it for the most part. Beautifully shot and scored, but gratuitously dark and violent which seriously upset my best friend's girlfriend who started yelling at us to turn it off and asked "Why the **** are you two watching this what is wrong with you guys???"

We didn't of course, because both of us are bigger than her and she was holding a baby so she wasn't gon' do **** anyways, but it did get me to thinking how much was too much. There is a scene in this movie that was too much for me. Not too much that I turned off the TV and refused to finish, but too much that it made me not like the movie anymore from that point.

It felt disgustingly manipulative and done for pure shock value. Not doubting that **** like this happens, but it didn't serve the story in any way other than eliciting a feeling of total revulsion.

I don't even know if I'd feel comfortable recommending it, other than the possibility that it's a story everyone should know and see to wake them up to the horrors of the world, but since it takes place in an unnamed African country, it almost feels detached from the humanity that it's trying to portray, and serves to give the various forms of violence that aforementioned gratuitous feeling.

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Shia Labeouf is an incredible actor. If he wasn't such a gigantic shitgoon he'd be one of the most sought after guys in Hollywood right now. Charlie Countryman is a pretty great movie if you can find it, not sure if it's still on Netflix, but that's where I saw it.

Speaking of Netflix, I checked out Cary Fukunaga's Beasts of No Nation and enjoyed the first half of it for the most part. Beautifully shot and scored, but gratuitously dark and violent which seriously upset my best friend's girlfriend who started yelling at us to turn it off and asked "Why the **** are you two watching this what is wrong with you guys???"

We didn't of course, because both of us are bigger than her and she was holding a baby so she wasn't gon' do **** anyways, but it did get me to thinking how much was too much. There is a scene in this movie that was too much for me. Not too much that I turned off the TV and refused to finish, but too much that it made me not like the movie anymore from that point.

It felt disgustingly manipulative and done for pure shock value. Not doubting that **** like this happens, but it didn't serve the story in any way other than eliciting a feeling of total revulsion.

I don't even know if I'd feel comfortable recommending it, other than the possibility that it's a story everyone should know and see to wake them up to the horrors of the world, but since it takes place in an unnamed African country, it almost feels detached from the humanity that it's trying to portray, and serves to give the various forms of violence that aforementioned gratuitous feeling.

I've seen a lot about BONN but forgot Fukunaga directed it. I doubt I'll watch it.

I posted it in the other thread, but I watched Inherent Vice, and I will be buying it. It's the most Big Lebowski-esque movie since, well, the Big Lebowski. I loved it.

Watched Silver Linings Playbook with Mrs. Mdrake34. It's a surprisingly good rom-com, it was deserving of the praise it received, fantastic performances by Cooper, Lawrence, Deniro, and Chris Tucker was great. Also, Lawrence spends 90% of the film in work out clothes, which made my soul, and my dong, hurt.

I bought Mad Max Fury Road after renting it initially. Will be watching it again soon.

I recorded Birdman, will check it out next.

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Silver Linings Playbook was a great movie. Jennifer Lawrence won my soul forever with her role in it. Deniro and Cooper were their normally great selves, but Lawrence stole the ******* show.

Still haven't watched Inherent Vice, and have tried to watch Birdman twice now. I've got to really try to find a time when I'm in the mood to sit down and commit to that movie, because the previous two times I have been bored to tears.

mdrake34 likes this

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Ftr, Birdman is as accessible as a movie that deals specifically with art and self-knowledge can get. It's wonderful and it's not an exhausting experience like the first time you watch Persona or Inland Empire.

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Very late to the party, but I finally watched Fargo after many years of putting it off. I enjoyed the **** out of it. I feel like a turd, and rightfully so, for not watching it.

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That looks awesome and has one **** of a cast with Kate Winslett, Woody Harrelson, Casey Affleck, Chiwetel Ejiofore, Anthony Mackie, Norman Reedus, Aaron Paul and Gal Gadot.

Yeah, definitely seeing this one in the theater.

Lukas jackson likes this

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I watched Birdman. I liked it. Great camera work in the hallways backstage, those were great shots. I think I recall reading a review when it came out about it being a movie about really bad people. I think that's pretty accurate.

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I watched Birdman. I liked it. Great camera work in the hallways backstage, those were great shots. I think I recall reading a review when it came out about it being a movie about really bad people. I think that's pretty accurate.

That's a terrible way of looking at it, but whatever, as long as you saw it.

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It's a biting satire of the show business industry, what it means to be an "artist/actor," and it uses hilariously narcissistic and selfish characters for all of that to play out.

Edward Norton admiring his hammer in the dressing room sort of encapsulates all of that.

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But it's not about "bad people," it's about people who suffer or lose themselves in the literalization of their internal conflict between being happy and successful in real life and making "real" art with which they can define themselves even as it is necessarily fiction someone else wrote and they can only inhabit. Edward Norton plays an actor that fully defines himself by what he is on stage at the expense of his real life being little more than a method of facilitating his art. Keaton differs from him in that his actual talent, acting as a myth rather than a fully realized fictional person, is regarded as a lower art and he a lower actor incapable of saying anything meaningful about the human condition by those who distinguish between high and low art. It's certainly a cynical, dark comedy - he wins over his critics by literally blowing off his nose to spite his face - but these are people who are tasked by the identities they created as actors and the very concept of high art to pursue it at all costs even as it leads them past the darkest realities of humanity and its inevitable pursuit of that and other ideals. It's missing out on a much greater statement about the necessity and conflict of different types of fiction to say it's just a satire of the business and the pricks it pays.

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Although it's a short film, I really loved Kung Fury. Most entertaining 30 minutes I've seen in a long time. Quite absurd, but very enjoyable.

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