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Nothing so far

EDIT: Dang my phone didn't update me with all these posts lol seriously last thing my phone showed was atlfalcon post about anything else on Kanter etc.

Still though haven't heard anything else so far though have to look around, but having Affalo and Kanter would actually be considered an upgrade right now.

Hawks certainly wont get both

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So I was poking around hoop stats and I sorted all NBA players by their efficiency rating.

Pero is 308 out of 460 lol. 2 spots above Millsaps... Brother elijah.

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So I was poking around hoop stats and I sorted all NBA players by their efficiency rating.

Pero is 308 out of 460 lol. 2 spots above Millsaps... Brother elijah.

While obviously we're one of those teams who's sum is greater than it's parts Thrillsap is still the best individual part at least in my mind just ahead Teague and Horford.

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So think this might be something apparently, but it's a RUMOR Cavs could be out of contention with Ray Allen.

http://www.sportsworldreport.com/articles/43776/20150212/ray-allen-rumors-atlanta-hawks-contract-cleveland-cavaliers-lebron-james-kevin-love-recruiting-tim-duncan-spurs-deal-clippers-option.htm

This is Brian Windhorst though so take it for what you want again it's a RUMOR though.

Trying to reread this one section and I can't really figure out how much of it's actual rumor or just conjecture.

According to Windhorst, the Cavaliers are starting to fall out of contention for Allen simply because they are a bad fit for the guard.

The Cavaliers are rotating eight men at the moment and Allen's minutes would be nowhere near what he would like. Cleveland finally has the chemistry they need to win games and Allen simply might not fit in moving forward. However, playing less minutes to win a title could be intriguing for Allen.

The Atlanta Hawks could be the best fit for Allen and the Atlanta Journal Constitution reported they already contacted Allen's camp about a potential contract. The Hawks would be a solid fit for the guard as they thrive off perimeter shooting and the long ball. That is Allen's specialty and he would get plenty of playing time. Atlanta cleared a roster spot on Tuesday and Allen could sub right in

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While obviously we're one of those teams who's sum is greater than it's parts Thrillsap is still the best individual part at least in my mind just ahead Teague and Horford.

Stats back that up as well

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Oh yeah I figured out who that Windhorst guy is! He's the guy if they ever made a movie about the Miami Heat experiment he'd be played by Jonah Hill

Brian-Windhorst-SiriusXM-Radio.png

(Still not sure which of the two this is actually a picture of ph34r.png)

Still from what I can tell he's always been pretty on the ball about what's going on around the world of Lebron. Seemed like he might have been among the first to break Ray Allen to the Heat and later Lebron to Cleveland, he was pretty much Sportcenter's Miami Heat beat writer for the duration of Lebron's tenure.

We'll see though. I'd still put money on the Cavs personally but expect the rumors to really start heating up during the ASG week.

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450681306.jpg?w=640&h=406

It doesn’t qualify as a guarantee but one odds site says Hawks are favorite to sign Ray Allen. (Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

The Hawks go into the All-Star break with the second-best record in the NBA at 43-11, trailing only Golden State (42-9), a team they beat last week. More importantly, they have a comfortable lead in the Eastern Conference over Toronto (6½ games), Chicago (9), Washington (10) and Cleveland (10½, but rising).

Notwithstanding blowing a game in Boston the other night, they have been a joy to watch. The on-court product has been a nice distraction from the off-court mess, where we’ve seen the excommunication of part-owner Bruce Levenson, the franchise going up for sale and the limbo status of general manager Danny Ferry.

The kids off the court just can’t play nice. If you missed it, I have a column on MyAJC.com on how individual agendas are still driving the circus bus off the court. Here’s a link that will get you there.

Back off the court, the NBA trade deadline is in six days and the Hawks are among the bidders for free agent three-point specialist Ray Allen, who has played on title teams in Boston and Miami. Actually, they are the favorites to sign Allen, according to the sports odds website, Vegas Insider, which has listed odds for nine teams on signing Allen and winning the NBA title.

Vegas Insider’s Tony Mejia has the Hawks as the favorite to sign Allen at 3-1 and third best to win the title at 7-1.

Here are the odds for the nine teams listed.

Team Signing Allen Winning Title
Hawks        3-1      7-1
Golden State 4-1      4-1
Cleveland    8-1      3-1
San Antonio 10-1      8-1
LA Clippers 15-1      20-1
Chicago     20-1      11-1
Memphis     20-1      12-1
Washington  25-1      40-1
Miami       40-1      150-1

Mejia has a nice breakdown on each team. Here’s what he writes about the Hawks:

Atlanta Hawks

Pros:
The Hawks share the ball beautifully and seek out the open man, so getting the great looks Allen has become accustomed to wouldn’t be a problem. Although he likely wouldn’t share the floor with Kyle Korver too often, there would be late-game situations where he’d share the floor with the guy who has replaced him as the league’s deadliest shooter. That can’t hurt. He’d instantly provide a championship pedigree to a contender that doesn’t have anyone on the roster that has reached the Finals.

Cons:
Once Thabo Sefolosha returns from his calf injury, Allen would be even more of a situational player, since head coach Mike Budenholzer would have another key option on the wing beyond starters Korver and DeMarre Carroll. Of course, at this stage of his career, that wouldn’t be such a bad thing.

Sportsbook.ag NBA title odds:
+700 (7-to-1), currently third-best.

Odds Allen signs:
Trading first-round selection Adreian Payne to Minnesota for a future first-rounder opened a roster spot that Allen would fill nicely. Considering what a strong fit this is from a style of play standpoint, the Hawks are VI’s favorite to land his services. 3-to-1.

For the entire story,

Thoughts on this? Do the Hawks need Allen, or another big man, both or neither?

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450681306.jpg?w=640&h=406

It doesn’t qualify as a guarantee but one odds site says Hawks are favorite to sign Ray Allen. (Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

The Hawks go into the All-Star break with the second-best record in the NBA at 43-11, trailing only Golden State (42-9), a team they beat last week. More importantly, they have a comfortable lead in the Eastern Conference over Toronto (6½ games), Chicago (9), Washington (10) and Cleveland (10½, but rising).

Notwithstanding blowing a game in Boston the other night, they have been a joy to watch. The on-court product has been a nice distraction from the off-court mess, where we’ve seen the excommunication of part-owner Bruce Levenson, the franchise going up for sale and the limbo status of general manager Danny Ferry.

The kids off the court just can’t play nice. If you missed it, I have a column on MyAJC.com on how individual agendas are still driving the circus bus off the court. Here’s a link that will get you there.

Back off the court, the NBA trade deadline is in six days and the Hawks are among the bidders for free agent three-point specialist Ray Allen, who has played on title teams in Boston and Miami. Actually, they are the favorites to sign Allen, according to the sports odds website, Vegas Insider, which has listed odds for nine teams on signing Allen and winning the NBA title.

Vegas Insider’s Tony Mejia has the Hawks as the favorite to sign Allen at 3-1 and third best to win the title at 7-1.

Here are the odds for the nine teams listed.

Team Signing Allen Winning Title
Hawks        3-1      7-1
Golden State 4-1      4-1
Cleveland    8-1      3-1
San Antonio 10-1      8-1
LA Clippers 15-1      20-1
Chicago     20-1      11-1
Memphis     20-1      12-1
Washington  25-1      40-1
Miami       40-1      150-1

Mejia has a nice breakdown on each team. Here’s what he writes about the Hawks:

Atlanta Hawks

Pros:
The Hawks share the ball beautifully and seek out the open man, so getting the great looks Allen has become accustomed to wouldn’t be a problem. Although he likely wouldn’t share the floor with Kyle Korver too often, there would be late-game situations where he’d share the floor with the guy who has replaced him as the league’s deadliest shooter. That can’t hurt. He’d instantly provide a championship pedigree to a contender that doesn’t have anyone on the roster that has reached the Finals.

Cons:
Once Thabo Sefolosha returns from his calf injury, Allen would be even more of a situational player, since head coach Mike Budenholzer would have another key option on the wing beyond starters Korver and DeMarre Carroll. Of course, at this stage of his career, that wouldn’t be such a bad thing.

Sportsbook.ag NBA title odds:
+700 (7-to-1), currently third-best.

Odds Allen signs:
Trading first-round selection Adreian Payne to Minnesota for a future first-rounder opened a roster spot that Allen would fill nicely. Considering what a strong fit this is from a style of play standpoint, the Hawks are VI’s favorite to land his services. 3-to-1.

For the entire story,

Thoughts on this? Do the Hawks need Allen, or another big man, both or neither?

I'd take Kanter and Allen if possible trading away Pero/Jenkins somehow to Utah with that Minny 1st. or just Jenkins/Minny 1st. That's all I would do personally I'd rather keep Pero for defensive presence if possible.

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Lmao decided to check out the celebrity game for a second, tip-off was Mo'ne Davis versus Kevin Hart and they were almost eye to eye laugh.png

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I thought mone was a wnba player at first.

Wouldn't surprise me in the least if that where she ends up, in fact I'd be more surprised if she didn't. Her biggest challenge is going to be not getting crushed under the weight of all these expectations from such a young age. I can't remember too many pre-teen athletes that were already this famous boy or girl.

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Report: Atlanta Hawks express interest in Gary Neal

By Brad Rowland @BTRowland on Feb 13, 2015, 2:14p 29







usa-today-8358187.0.jpg
Chris Humphreys-USA TODAY Sports




The Atlanta Hawks have an open roster spot, and one report indicates that the team has expressed interest in Minnesota Timberwolves guard Gary Neal.




In the wake of the Adreian Payne trade, much of the attention has been paid to the possible acquisition of free agent shooting guard Ray Allen. However, an alternate name was floated in the hours after the Atlanta Hawks opened a roster spot, and that name popped up again on Friday afternoon in a report that the team could be interested in acquiring veteran guard Gary Neal.



Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo reports "interest" on the part of the Hawks, but in the same breath, the 30-year-old Neal isn't (yet) a free agent. Most expect that Minnesota and Neal will eventually work out a buyout of some sort (Neal has not played in a game since arriving via trade from Charlotte), but it must be added that the Hawks would likely wait until he is freely available to make any sort of overture.


The 6-foot-4 Neal is a career 38.1% shooter from 3-point range, and that is his principle appeal to contending teams. However, that number has dipped to just 29.3% on 3.1 attempts per game in 2014-2015, and there are real questions about whether he would even serve as an upgrade over internal options like Kent Bazemore and Shelvin Mack.


Mike Budenholzer and Gary Neal have a history dating back to San Antonio, so the interest makes some semblance of sense, but from a basketball standpoint, the fit isn't as graceful as some may think. Stay tuned.





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^^^ not surprised. He offers the same things as Allen, but is younger and played for the Spurs with Bud.

Only problem is he is in a massive 3pt slump this year.

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Why the Hawks Won't be the Braves in the Playoffs

By Michael B&B @BravesAndBirds on Feb 12, 2015, 12:00p 28







462879600.0.jpg
Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images




Hey everyone, watch an Atlanta sports fan talk himself into the "this time will be different!" trap.




So after opining last week on how the Braves' playoff struggles affect the way that I view this Hawks team, now it's time to pivot and make the case for why the Hawks won't make us miserable in May and June the way the Braves typically did in October. In other words, this is column where I talk myself into being optimistic. About an Atlanta sports team. In the playoffs.


1. The NBA playoffs are less random than the MLB playoffs.


A great baseball team usually wins a little more than 60% of its games. (100-62 translates to a .617 winning percentage.) A great basketball team usually wins about 75% of its games. (62-20 translates to a .756 winning percentage.) This stands to reason, as baseball is a low-scoring game in which a superior team can easily lose a game based on a variety of factors that have nothing to do with skill. Basketball is a high-scoring game in which a superior team will generally prevail. In other words, variance is higher in baseball. This is bad when your baseball team goes 104-58, as the '93 Braves did before losing the NLCS to the Phillies. This is good when your basketball team is on pace for a 66-16 record.


2. Playing at home is a bigger advantage in basketball.


Based on the fact that home teams in MLB win 53.9% of their games, while home teams in the NBA win 60.5%, it's fairly clear that playing big playoff games at home is a bigger deal in basketball. Jon Bois reached a similar conclusion when he crunched some numbers in 2011 and found that the effect of home court advantage in the NBA is almost twice that of MLB. The explanation for the existence of home court advantage, as described by Tobias J. Moskowitz and L. Jon Wertheim in Scorecasting (see the first link in this section), is the effect of crowds on referees:



With the National Basketball Association, they detailed the following: "Home teams shoot more free throws than away teams-between 1 and 1.5 more per game. Why? Because away teams are called for more fouls, particularly shooting fouls. Away teams also are called for more turnovers and more violations."

Also, It turns out that offensive and loose ball fouls go the home team's way at twice the rate of other personal fouls. We can also look at fouls that are more valuable, such as those that cause a change of possession. These fouls are almost four times more likely to go the home team's way than fouls that don't cause a change of possessionThe chance of a visiting player getting called for traveling is 15 percent higher than it is for a home team player."

"Referee bias could well be the main reason for home court advantage in basketball. And if the refs call turnovers and fouls in the home team's favor, we can assume they make other biased calls in favor of the home team that we cannot see or measure."


By virtue of being an indoor sport, basketball crowds are louder than baseball crowds (the roof traps the decibels) and the fans are closer to the floor (and therefore, the referees). Thus, it would stand to reason that basketball refs would be more affected by cheering and booing than baseball umps. Keep that in mind when the Hawks play a big playoff game at Philips this spring.


3. Unlike the Hawks, the Braves forfeited one of their big advantages in the playoffs.


How did the Braves win 14 straight divisional titles? Ask most fans of the team and the first two words out of their mouths will be "starting pitching." The Braves had consistently excellent rotation depth, which meant that for 162 games over six months, they would trot out a quality starter for just about every game. In the playoffs, with rotations shortened, the Braves' pitching depth became a wasted asset. Force the Braves to play an opponent in an eleven-game series taking place over 12 days and Atlanta would have had a massive advantage because their fourth and fifth starters were typically much better than those of an opponent. Change the test to five games in seven days and the advantage goes away.


Take, for example, the 2002 Braves. That team went 101-59 and lost in the first round of the playoffs to the 95-66 San Francisco Giants. Home teams went 2-3 in that series, which illustrates the point that home field advantage does not matter much in baseball. The Braves' fourth starter that year was Damian Moss, whose ERA+ was 122. The Giants' fourth starter was Livan Hernandez, whose ERA+ was 89. In other words, the Braves' fourth starter was significantly better than league average, while the Giants' fourth starter was worse. Hernandez was only forced to start one game in the NLDS; Moss didn't pitch at all. (More on that in the next section.)


Unlike the Braves, the Hawks won't be checking their assets at the door when the playoffs start. The team plays the San Antonio Spurs style, a point that LeBron James noted immediately when the Hawks gave the Heat all they could handle early last season. As Danny Chau put it, "there just hasn't been much of an argument against the Hawks as a viable contender ... when a team is consistently identified as 'Spurs East,' validity is implied." There's no reason to think that Mike Budenholzer will be quoting Bill Beane's "my sh*t doesn't work in the playoffs" line because Coach Bud's sh*t has worked for years.


Additionally, playoff baseball (unlike basketball) is played in different conditions than the regular season. The weather is colder, which favors power pitchers. It's no accident that of the Braves' three Hall of Fame pitchers, John Smoltz - the hardest thrower of the three - had the most success in October. The format also favors teams with dominant closers, which was rarely the Braves.


There's no analog to these issues in the NBA. The game is played in the same conditions. The playoffs don't favor teams with particular assets and liabilities. At most, one can say that the pace in the playoffs gets slower and refs call fewer fouls, but there's no reason why the Hawks - a team with an outstanding half-court offense - would be hurt.


4. Bobby Cox's isn't on the Hawks' bench.


For the record, I love Bobby Cox. I grew up on the Braves being terrible, so I will never have anything but fondness for the guy who turned the team from one of the worst in baseball to one of the best, first as the GM and then as the manager. Bobby was an outstanding manager in the regular season. He kept an even-keel with his players, never overreacting to a particular win or loss. He would go to bat for his guys, as evidenced by all of those ejections.


However, those qualities that made Bobby a great regular season manager - patience and loyalty - made him a below-average playoff skipper. Take the aforementioned series against the Giants. Despite having an excellent fourth starter, Cox elected to go with a three-man rotation - omitting Moss - and gave the starting nod in Games 1 and 4 to Tom Glavine (September ERA: 4.83) instead of Kevin Millwood (September ERA 3.35). Cox's mistakes with respect to the rotation illustrated all of his playoff shortcomings: distrust of young players (Moss), favoring veterans (Glavine), not going with the hot hand (Millwood), and not using his assets properly (starting pitching depth). Cox made postseason blunders from the start of his time with the Braves (Charlie Leibrandt in relief) to the end (the painful Game Three against the Giants in 2010).


Budenholzer doesn't have a track record as a head coach in the playoffs, save for the Hawks' surprising effort in pushing the Pacers to seven last spring. However, he's given us plenty of indications that he will be an asset in the spring. He's not afraid to give time to young players when they deserve it, as evidenced by his handling of Dennis Schröder this year. More importantly, the team consistently gets good looks on offense when coming out of timeouts, a strength that was evident even in the team's worst loss this season and, even before that, when he produced "Coach Bud special" in San Antonio. The notion of Budenholzer making a key late-game decision doesn't provoke the same feelings of dread that Cox's October gambits did.


So maybe my years of accumulated pessimism about Atlanta teams in the playoffs aren't warranted? Is it possible that one can be a Hawks fan and be optimistic about the spring?





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Hawks might have the best home court advantage in the playoffs.

I dont think it will possible to match the craziness of Phillips arena if we're a number one seed.

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Well we will find out playoffs basically 2 months away lol. Hopefully Phillips will be loud come time for the playoffs. Question is does anybody see us advancing to ECF? I'm only asking because we've been talking about weakness recently. I still believe we will get y

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Well we will find out playoffs basically 2 months away lol. Hopefully Phillips will be loud come time for the playoffs. Question is does anybody see us advancing to ECF? I'm only asking because we've been talking about weakness recently. I still believe we will get y

I think we can still get to the ECF and maybe Thabo being out is really disrupting things but I have confidence in what Bud has built right now to get it done. I just think that suring up that small weakness of reboudning (defensive specifically) could just put the cherry on top!cool.png

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