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Cheff's Research Into Teryl Austin And Dan Quinn With Analysis


Falconcheff
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In another thread, poster Strife mentioned he'd like to see a side by side of Quinn and Austin's coaching trees. Here's what I found, with my own analysis at the end.

Here's their coaching resume's...

Teryl Austin

Austin then began a career in coaching, landing a position as a graduate assistant at Penn State in 1991. In 1993, he accompanied fellow Penn State assistant Jim Caldwell to Wake Forest where he served as secondary coach.[1]

Austin went on to serve on the coaching staffs at Syracuse and Michigan before joining the Seattle Seahawks' staff in 2003, helping Seattle advance to Super Bowl XL in 2006.

He joined the Arizona Cardinals coaching staff as coach of defensive backs in 2007. He helped the team reach Super Bowl XLIII in 2009.

On February 12, 2010, it was announced that Austin had been hired as the defensive coordinator for the Florida Gators.[2] His tenure as defensive coordinator ended following the Gators' 37–24 victory over the Penn State Nittany Lions in the 2011 Outback Bowl, and head coach Urban Meyer's resignation in December 2010.

On January 26, 2011, it was announced that Austin had been hired as the secondary coach for the Baltimore Ravens, and helped lead them to a Super Bowl victory over the San Francisco 49ers.

On January 16, 2014, it was announced that Austin had been hired as the defensive coordinator for the Detroit Lions.

Dan Quinn

In professional football, Quinn spent six years coaching the defensive lines for the San Francisco 49ers (2003-04), Miami Dolphins (2005-06) and the New York Jets (2007-08). He began his NFL coaching career in San Francisco as their defensive quality control coach in 2001 before moving to the defensive line. Quinn joined the Seattle Seahawks on January 12, 2009, but also served as the defensive coordinator for the Florida Gators during the 2011 and 2012 seasons. The 2012 defense was much improved. Behind a defense that had grown into one of nation's best and a ball control offense led by 1,000-yard rusher Mike Gillislee, Florida outscored their opponents 115–30 in the fourth quarter while posting an 11–1 regular season record and earning their first top-5 ranking since 2009. Quinn returned to the Seahawks on January 17, 2013, to replace Gus Bradley, who became the Jacksonville Jaguars head coach.

First thing that leaped out at me was seeing Austin help lead THREE different teams to Super Bowls as Defensive Backs coach... Second was that Austin's coaching tree was not as bare as I first gave credit for... I knew he'd been with Caldwell a few times, but Holmgren in Sea, Whisenhunt in 'Zona, Urban Meyer in Fla and John Harbaugh in Balt is not bad. The guy OBVIOUSLY makes secondaries "special!"

Quinn's resume is surprisingly bad once I actually looked it up... With San Fran, Dennis Erickson was coach from 03-04, and in '04 the 9ers had the worst record in football, prompting the firing of everybody. His two years in Miami were Nick Saban's 2 year NFL flop project. Again, everyone fired for underperformance. In 07-08 Quinn worked under Mangini in NY, and was for the third time let go as part of a failed staff. One bad year and one good year with Florida brought Quinn to Seattle, where he has excelled under Pete Carroll.

Before last year with Seattle, Quinn has never been to the playoffs, or even been part of a decent, relevant team. Granted, the woeful teams he was a part of were woeful due to their offense, but contrast Austin's 3-team SB appearances with Quinn's track record of 4-12, 2-14 teams, and I'm truly amazed. After reading up a little on both of them, I think I've made a 180, and am full on for Teryl Austin.

Before DC gigs, Austin was mostly a secondary man, while Quinn worked mostly as a Dline assistant. If resume's speak for themselves, Austin seems to be head and shoulders above Quinn in playoff experience, overall records, multi-team success, you name it.

I hope this helps some of y'all posters out there who didn't know much about either one's history...

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I've favored Austin over everybody except Ryan from the start, so I certainly won't be upset if that's who we end up with. Knowing it's going to either be Austin or Quinn, I'm almost more concerned with their coordinator choices than which one of them is better qualified. No question both are solid prospects and worthy of the opportunity.

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This is flawed logic because if you actually want to go deep into how they have fared then u have to look at how the units they were specifically in charge for fared against other teams not the overall team records. For example how Austin's secondary fared vs the rest of the league or how Quinn's Dline fared against other Dlines. Ofcourse the players will ultimately matter as well. Now I could care less which of the 2 is picked because I like both of them but you can't just look at overall records to see how they performed at their jobs.

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FOX Sports South writer Knox Bardeen

ATLANTA -- The Atlanta Falcons just finished the second week of their search for a new head coach. Week 3 could be a very telling.

When the Falcons released Mike Smith from his contract, team owner Arthur Blank offered no timetable to find a replacement. He's willing to move as slow as necessary to make the right choice, and the NFL playoffs provide another speed bump as many of the coaches on Atlanta's wish list are still in action (NFL rules prohibit teams from outside the playoff picture to hire away coaches on teams that are still maneuvering for a Super Bowl).

This is the case for what should be the top option for the Falcons: Seattle defensive coordinator Dan Quinn.

Quinn has been the defensive coordinator for the Seahawks for the past two seasons, both of which his team put the NFL's best defense on the field. Prior to that, Quinn was the defensive coordinator for the Florida Gators from 2011-12, and was with the Seahawks from 2009-10 as the defensive line coach.

It's no secret that Quinn excels up front, along the line of scrimmage. He was a defensive lineman in the early 90s at Salisbury State, and the entirety of his 19 years in coaching has been on the defensive side of the football, most of which as a line coach. Where he excels is finding ways to get the most out of his players by featuring their skill sets.

On many occasions, Quinn has said one of the best lessons he's learned from Seattle head coach Pete Carroll is how to feature players. Quinn's mantra is to take the talented guys on a roster and let them do what they do best.

He's also extremely creative when it comes to getting the most out of his players.

In 2010, Quinn was instrumental in moving then-defensive tackle Red Bryant to defensive end. The move helped Seattle defend the run, and gave some of Seattle's speed rushers more space to make moves and get after the quarterback. Getting outside to the five technique also made Bryant a full-time starter, instead of a part-time interior lineman.

Quinn is a tactician along the defensive line. His ability to move players around like pieces on a chess board would benefit the Falcons tremendously with the players already on Atlanta's roster. His knack for evaluating talent could also help the Falcons when it comes to free agency and the draft. Quinn knows what his defensive line needs, and knows what to look for.

One of the biggest areas within this Atlanta defense that as a whole needs a lot of work, is the defensive line, both in stopping the run and getting pressure on an opposing quarterback.

It's easy to point a finger at Quinn's results with Seattle and say something to the tune of that heralded unit was No. 1 in the NFL before he arrived. And that's every bit the case. But when Quinn returned to Seattle in 2013, the defense improved from allowing 15.3 points per game the year prior, to 14.2 in his first season as coordinator.

Seattle also improved from 19th in the league in sacks with 36 to eighth with 44.

That's the kind of improvement that needs to happen in Atlanta. Quinn's shown he can get those results.

Quinn also gets a lot of credit in Seattle for putting the building blocks in place in 2010 for the Seahawks rise to power on the defensive side of the football. The team drafted Earl Thomas and Kam Chancellor in 2010, and Quinn was never shy about singing the praises of Chancellor's upside (he was a fifth-round pick), even when the safety was just a special-teams player.

Being able to see talent and then get the most out of it makes Quinn a valuable commodity. It's especially important to a team like Atlanta that hasn't done well of late adding tools along the defensive line.

When you see a Quinn-created defense, nothing really pops out from a scheme standpoint. He isn't known for elaborate looks. In fact, it's quite the opposite. Quinn's defense is fast and physical, but it isn't overly complicated. You may only see two to three different variations in a game, which allows the defense to move faster and get aggressive when needed.

Seattle relies on basic defensive schemes and talented players to get the job done. Quinn puts the unit in great situations to succeed, and doesn't depend on heavy blitz packages to get pressure on the quarterback.

His ability to evaluate talent, coach it up and then get the most out of his players on the field on game day, makes Quinn a perfect choice for the Falcons. But there's a problem with hiring Quinn.

To hire Quinn, the Falcons will have to wait until the Seahawks are bounced from the playoffs. That might not happen, as Seattle looks good enough to make it to the Super Bowl. If Atlanta waits that long, it may have to pass on other options like Todd Bowles.

And if the Falcons do wait, they won't be the only suitor. The New York Jets are very much in the hunt for Quinn's services, and they're prepared to press hard to hire him. Quinn was on staff with the Jets from 2007-08, and he grew up close by in Morristown, N.J.

If Atlanta waits to enter serious talks with Quinn, there's a risk that he could choose the Jets. The Falcons would then have to fall back on another candidate. All the good coaches currently on the Falcons' list might already be gone.

To get Quinn, that's a chance the Falcons will have to take.

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Quinn took each of the three teams he was on defensive lines to be top ten in sacks and against the run...just because the team was bad doesn't mean his defensive line was bad. He was good at what he did.

Out of the 7 best teams in sacks this year, only one made the playoffs (Baltimore). Doesn't mean that their position coaches are bad however.

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This is flawed logic because if you actually want to go deep into how they have fared then u have to look at how the units they were specifically in charge for fared against other teams not the overall team records. For example how Austin's secondary fared vs the rest of the league or how Quinn's Dline fared against other Dlines. Ofcourse the players will ultimately matter as well. Now I could care less which of the 2 is picked because I like both of them but you can't just look at overall records to see how they performed at their jobs.

The original topic was more about coaching trees than records. Caldwell, Holmgren, Whiz, Meyer and Harbaugh >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Erickson, Saban, Mangini, Will Muschamp (Fla HC) and Carroll... oh, and I didn't get to the fact that he Quinn also was with Mora Jr his first year with Seattle (before the Florida gig)...

that said, the intangibles can't be denied either... 3 SB appearances with 3 different teams >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 3 times let go with subpar staffs

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Honestly who their linked to at OC is just as important. Both guys can coach defence and are rookie HC candidates. The difference may be which OC their bringing to the party. If its Kyle Shanahan ill take him over a nobody. We must stay in the NFL top 5-7 in offence to have any hope of playoffs

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Yeah, it's going to all be about who each coach is pitching as their OC in their 2nd interview, and ATL's decision will weigh heavily on that. That's how Smitty was hired - He already had a coordinator plan right off the bat to present and Rex probably did not.

Edited by Maltese Falcon
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The original topic was more about coaching trees than records. Caldwell, Holmgren, Whiz, Meyer and Harbaugh >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Erickson, Saban, Mangini, Will Muschamp (Fla HC) and Carroll... oh, and I didn't get to the fact that he Quinn also was with Mora Jr his first year with Seattle (before the Florida gig)...

that said, the intangibles can't be denied either... 3 SB appearances with 3 different teams >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 3 times let go with subpar staffs

He won a title with Meyer too didn't he?

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+1 Good read Falconcheff. Thanks for the info.. I learned a lot from your post. I haven't watched much college football in the past, this last year I watched more than I ever have so I had no idea both were defensive coordinators for the Florida Gators, or that Quinn took the job next after Austin for Florida.

I'll be the first to admit I was really wanting Rex Ryan as the Falcons next HC. I have since changed my mind and feel like now if the Falcons get Austin or Quinn as their next HC that will be the best thing for the Falcons.

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I've favored Austin over everybody except Ryan from the start, so I certainly won't be upset if that's who we end up with. Knowing it's going to either be Austin or Quinn, I'm almost more concerned with their coordinator choices than which one of them is better qualified. No question both are solid prospects and worthy of the opportunity.

apparently Scott Pioli is concerned with Teryl Austin's coordinator choices as well laugh.png

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so much of the analysis on who was the secondary coach on this team or the D-Line coach of that team - and did they win a championship? - and who has the most rings, etc. - while part of the equation, I don't think it should even be in the top 10 of things you are looking for in a head coach.

Just like the football players - play a team game - the football coaches are a team as well. No one has more influence over a team than the head coach. Also, if you are an assistant coach or a D-coordinator on a less than talented team - then you are not going to be winning championships either.

I do think Falconcheff did good work here and I am not knocking it - thanks Falconcheff - all I am saying is these resume's are just a small part of the overall puzzle when evaluating these coaches.

I don't give Austin an edge because of this nor Quinn either one.

To me, the most important things you look for in a head coach - just my opinion:

  1. Leadership
  2. Be a players coach (does not mean you are a pushover)
  3. Be able to spot talent and identify it to Scouting dept.
  4. Ability to adapt and make "in-game" adjustments
  5. Ability to Delegate
  6. Ability to Inspire those around you
  7. Ability to set a tone and a playing style
  8. Have an eye for asst. coaching talent

I'm sure I missed some but that is off the top of my head.

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