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Ios And Android


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Recently, my job has provided us with iPhones and iPads to work with in the field. As a long time Android user (and Blackberry before that), I am having a hard time adjusting to iOS. Android allows for so much personalization, customization, and the ability to really make the device mine, whereas Apple seems to keep everything inside of their box.

With my Android devices, if I do not like my home and lock screen, or if the stock launcher doesn't have the functionality that I want, then I simply visit the Play Store and install a new launcher. Having to work outside, I like to stay current on weather conditions. I have a live weather widget on my home screen that allows me to do this without having to open an app, or search the internet for this information. I also use widgets for pandora, monitoring the resources on my device, and to view updates to social media sites.

Speaking of my home screen, I like to have it simple and clutter free. I only want to see the apps that I want to see on the home screen, and the rest of them reside in the app drawer. Inside of the app drawer, I can sort the apps by name, install date (descending and ascending), or by most used. On top of that, I can place the icons anywhere that I want to place them on the screen, much like on my windows computer. I can also use the features provided by the 3rd party launcher I have to expand the amount of columns/rows I can have on my screen, and I can resize any of the icons as well as the widgets.

I transfer a lot of files between my phone and my computer. With Android, I am able to connect to my computer using the charging cable that comes with the phone. I can see all of the folders in my phone's storage, and I can drag/drop files where I want them. I can also go into the file manager app to see the files in my storage. If I need additional storage, I simply add a micro SD card to my phone. Navigating through apps, the browser, and the phone is fast and painless because of the dedicated back button. Getting into a menu is also easy with the dedicated menu button.

I do not use many of the stock/bloatware apps that come with my phone, so I go into the app manager and disable the ones that I cannot uninstall completely. This has led to less clutter, and has also given me a nice boost in battery life. I use certain apps for certain situations, so I am able to set 3rd party apps to be the default app to open when those situations call for it.

First off, I'd like to say that the build quality on the apple devices is definitely very nice. They are very aesthetically pleasing. I love the fingerprint scanner on the 5s, and the switch on the side that toggles the sound to on or vibrate.

However, after having the iPhone for about a year now (started with the 4s, and currently have the 5s), and most recently getting the iPad Air tab, I can't honestly see what the big deal is about i-devices. I certainly cannot see the end product justifying their outrageous prices.

The operating system is completely closed, has very little customization options, and does not allow for choosing 3rd party apps as the default option. I cannot see the storage on my devices, or on the computer when the phone is connected. If I want to do anything with the phone relating to that, then I have to use iTunes. I cannot add a widget, arrange the icons the way I like, or hide apps from the home screen. The only way to hide some of the apps is to create a four page limited folder, and place the apps in there. There are no options to sort them inside of the folder.

When opening web links inside of apps, it takes me to safari with no option to set another browser as the default. Map links open in apple maps instead of the desired Google maps apps. There isn't an led indicator light that I can use to tell me I have notifications when the screen is off, and to set certain colors to it to indicate what type of notification I have (email, text, etc..). The only thing that is remotely close is a very bright flashing led on the backside.

When inside of an app, if I decide that I want to return to the previous page or to the app from a section of it, then I have to hope that a back button was built into the app somewhere on the screen that I usually have to search all over for. Same thing with opening a menu inside of an app. The lack of a back and menu button has been such a sore spot with me with iOS. They should take a page out of Android's book, and add a nav bar with dedicated menu/back/app switcher keys to it.

If I have an app or extension of an app that isn't in the Google Play Store that I need to install, then I can choose an option in the setting on my Android devices that allow me to install the app. It will give me an option to allow that action always, or just for that one instance. On iOS, nope. Well, it can, but you have to jailbreak it. This is forbidden on our company provided devices, though. Overall it feels as though I'm using somebody else's device that is telling me how I should use it, all the while locking me down to using their apps for the most part without an option to remove/disable them.

In conclusion to my rant, iOS just looks and feels like it did when it launched last decade. The new devices that come out every year are just a rehashed version of the previous one with a new feature added (mostly old features that Android has had for years that Apple finally decided to add). They did make the icons flatter, and changed the look up a little over time, but the look of it is virtually unchaged. As far as ease of use, I actually find it harder to use than any Android device I have ever used. When switching from my personal phone to my work phone, it feels as though I'm going from windows 7/8 back to a visually updated windows 95. I believe that most of the iPhone users continue to buy them because they started with the iPhone first, they have never tried a flagship Android phone, and they value the premium build materials over actual functionality. Let's be honest, do you see and feel the build materials (aluminum vs plastic exterior) when there is a case on the phone? No. You see and feel the case. Some people like having everything kept inside of a box, but I appreciate being given a choice.

Android OS >>>>> iOS.

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I missed you too buddy! sadwave.001.gif

I am just saying. You seem to really enjoy intents and Actions that are built into android as well as side loading apks and the latter is never going to happen in apple phones. The actions and intents is probably going to come around in a year or so, since they are slowly rolling out with extensions, which works similarly to intents and actions.

Android and iOS offer different things for different people. People who love customizations are not going to like iOS.

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I am just saying. You seem to really enjoy intents and Actions that are built into android as well as side loading apks and the latter is never going to happen in apple phones. The actions and intents is probably going to come around in a year or so, since they are slowly rolling out with extensions, which works similarly to intents and actions.

Android and iOS offer different things for different people. People who love customizations are not going to like iOS.

It's more about being disappointed that something that has been so hyped for so long isn't capable of some pretty basic things that have been available since the palm and blackberry days. Those devices were given to us to be productive with, but they have had the opposite effect because of the lack of basic functionality available with other operating systems. I've spent more time trying to find a way to get it to work like I want/need it to, than I have actually using it.

From what I gather, Apple products are great for art, but they aren't that great for much of anything else. That is 100% opinion, though. I'm not stating my opinion as fact. I am simply making an educated observation. It's not like I'm bashing the iPhone, and have not used one. I've used one daily for a year and a half now.

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It's more about being disappointed that something that has been so hyped for so long isn't capable of some pretty basic things that have been available since the palm and blackberry days. Those devices were given to us to be productive with, but they have had the opposite effect because of the lack of basic functionality available with other operating systems. I've spent more time trying to find a way to get it to work like I want/need it to, than I have actually using it.

From what I gather, Apple products are great for art, but they aren't that great for much of anything else. That is 100% opinion, though. I'm not stating my opinion as fact. I am simply making an educated observation. It's not like I'm bashing the iPhone, and have not used one. I've used one daily for a year and a half now.

grass is not always greener on the other side. I learned that when I switched to android in the past. I kept trying to make everything on my phone more like my iPhone. I will say that quite a few of the things you mentioned were false. I do not know what hype you got, but if you come at something from a different perspective than what that thing is trying to be, then you are going to be disappointed. That seems to be your down fall. you thought the way android worked and so you were disappointed when it did not work that way. I honestly could not see me using an actual file system on my phone. I think you failed if you need one on your phone. I also think a menu and back button are waste and proof of poor application design.

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grass is not always greener on the other side. I learned that when I switched to android in the past. I kept trying to make everything on my phone more like my iPhone. I will say that quite a few of the things you mentioned were false. I do not know what hype you got, but if you come at something from a different perspective than what that thing is trying to be, then you are going to be disappointed. That seems to be your down fall. you thought the way android worked and so you were disappointed when it did not work that way. I honestly could not see me using an actual file system on my phone. I think you failed if you need one on your phone. I also think a menu and back button are waste and proof of poor application design.

I suppose being in the tech world professionally for the past 14 years has my expectations a little higher than most. I find that the file system is very useful in that I can quickly find files, move them to where I need them to be, and create/delete additional folders to add/remove files that I need to. It is similar to how I use unix/linux and windows. With the iPhone, I have to figure out what app I need to use to find the file I am looking for. There is no file manager that I can go into to locate my downloads folder, for instance. I also cannot connect it to my computer to drag a file/folder from my computer to put into any specific place on my storage and vice versa. This is something that I do almost daily with my Android. Having to sync the iPhone with iTunes is pretty annoying, as well as limited. I could just be spoiled in the sense that my Android phone operates an awful lot like my pc.

Edit: I forgot to respond to the nav bar statement. Having used both devices, I would have to say that the nav bar is very convenient. I wouldn't say that it is poor app design at all having them. If nothing else, I would say that not having those functions built into an app would be poor app design. I can't tell you how many times on the iPhone I have had to completely close and app and start over to simply get to go back to a previous location in the app. With my Android phone, I would have simply pressed the back button and gotten back to where I needed to be.

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I suppose being in the tech world professionally for the past 14 years has my expectations a little higher than most. I find that the file system is very useful in that I can quickly find files, move them to where I need them to be, and create/delete additional folders to add/remove files that I need to. It is similar to how I use unix/linux and windows. With the iPhone, I have to figure out what app I need to use to find the file I am looking for. There is no file manager that I can go into to locate my downloads folder, for instance. I also cannot connect it to my computer to drag a file/folder from my computer to put into any specific place on my storage and vice versa. This is something that I do almost daily with my Android. Having to sync the iPhone with iTunes is pretty annoying, as well as limited. I could just be spoiled in the sense that my Android phone operates an awful lot like my pc.

Edit: I forgot to respond to the nav bar statement. Having used both devices, I would have to say that the nav bar is very convenient. I wouldn't say that it is poor app design at all having them. If nothing else, I would say that not having those functions built into an app would be poor app design. I can't tell you how many times on the iPhone I have had to completely close and app and start over to simply get to go back to a previous location in the app. With my Android phone, I would have simply pressed the back button and gotten back to where I needed to be.

it sounds like you don't know the shortcuts in iOS. Double tapping the home button can take you right back to your previous app without all the hassle.

Apple devises aren't for everyone.

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I use a iPhone and android device daily as well. iPhone for personal use and android for work. The things you like about the android phone are the things that get on my nerves about them. To me, they're over complicated in use. iPhones are much simpler to use which may cause some "features" to be excluded but I like it better that way. Personal preference I suppose.

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it sounds like you don't know the shortcuts in iOS. Double tapping the home button can take you right back to your previous app without all the hassle.

Apple devises aren't for everyone.

I was referring to being inside of an app and navigating to a previous place inside of the app. Most apps have a button appear if you tap the screen that will allow you to go back to the previous part of the app you were in. Some do not have this ability, and the only way to go back is to close the app by bringing up the app switcher by double tapping the home button, swiping it closed, and then reopening the app. I'm very familiar with the shortcuts, though there are many things that I still have to learn to be comfortable with this device like I am with Android. It seems as though I'm expecting too much out of it based on my experience with other systems.

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I use a iPhone and android device daily as well. iPhone for personal use and android for work. The things you like about the android phone are the things that get on my nerves about them. To me, they're over complicated in use. iPhones are much simpler to use which may cause some "features" to be excluded but I like it better that way. Personal preference I suppose.

I think that you nailed it on the head. If you start on one, then go to the other, then there is a huge learning curve. I'm a huge techie, and like to tinker with my devices. Android fits that need perfectly. Apple has made a system that is simple that works well with all of their products, and can be used by anyone. I don't see Android as difficult to use, though. Especially as each new version comes out. Lollipop looks like it will be a big winner. Even pro Apple sites like BGR seem to like it a lot.

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I think that you nailed it on the head. If you start on one, then go to the other, then there is a huge learning curve. I'm a huge techie, and like to tinker with my devices. Android fits that need perfectly. Apple has made a system that is simple that works well with all of their products, and can be used by anyone. I don't see Android as difficult to use, though. Especially as each new version comes out. Lollipop looks like it will be a big winner. Even pro Apple sites like BGR seem to like it a lot.

Lollipop is definitely android going in the right direction, but I would not call BGR a pro apple site. You can tell that Android and Apple are merging, but Android is still not there yet with the polish and apple is coming up with the popular features from android to implement in their system. Now we got widgets in our notification center and extensions look like it could mimic intents and actions in android, so that someone could make Chrome the default Browser or Google maps the default map application, but like with most things apple, it is going to take time to get to that point. Look at apple pay vs google wallet. I look at the merger of the two like presidential elections. Both sides have been catering to their original audience and are now running towards the middle to get the larger sales.

I still think having a back button in the app is better than wasting space for a nav bar or having the settings all in one spot instead of having to run around the app to get them.

I will say that I love my OS X experience and so I do like iTunes and how apple does things with the file system in iOS. I would be much happier if most things I download got put into the correct folder automatically. I have all my music in iTunes. Documents in Documents, Movies in Movies, Development stuff in a development folder.

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Lollipop is definitely android going in the right direction, but I would not call BGR a pro apple site. You can tell that Android and Apple are merging, but Android is still not there yet with the polish and apple is coming up with the popular features from android to implement in their system. Now we got widgets in our notification center and extensions look like it could mimic intents and actions in android, so that someone could make Chrome the default Browser or Google maps the default map application, but like with most things apple, it is going to take time to get to that point. Look at apple pay vs google wallet. I look at the merger of the two like presidential elections. Both sides have been catering to their original audience and are now running towards the middle to get the larger sales.

I still think having a back button in the app is better than wasting space for a nav bar or having the settings all in one spot instead of having to run around the app to get them.

I will say that I love my OS X experience and so I do like iTunes and how apple does things with the file system in iOS. I would be much happier if most things I download got put into the correct folder automatically. I have all my music in iTunes. Documents in Documents, Movies in Movies, Development stuff in a development folder.

I would be happy if iOS had OSX file management. I like OSX. iOS is a poor man's OSX. As far as chrome, I prefer dolphin browser to it. Chrome's mobile browser is lacking in features. I like the dials on the dolphin browser start page, and having a home button. Also, starting with kitkat, app developers have been able to code immersion mode that shrinks the nav bar to three small dots at the bottom of the screen that you can call up when you need them. As far as BGR, they are definitely pro apple, at least they have been traditionally when Geller was the main contributer. I will note that the last few hires Geller made have started to level the playing field a bit. There have been many more objective articles rather than the many subjective articles that I used to see.

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Seeing as how I am in an almost identical situation as you OP, Ill throw in my 2 cents: True tech people tend to be bigger fans of Android than iOS.

Before I am crucified, let me explain what I mean by "True tech people". People that work in IT, that have experience and an understanding in the deeper aspects of "Computer Science" (ie. Software Developers and Computer Technicians) typically gravitate toward Android, as it has many more power user functions. Other people in IT (Project Managers, Business Analyst, Consultants) gravitate toward iOS. I'm not saying this is always the case, but it is the usual. I work in a team of 15 developers and everyone of us have an iPhone for our work phone and an Android for our personal device (except me, see below).

I have had a company issued iPhone 5s for almost a year now, and I and still not fond it. A few months ago my Galaxy S3 decided to kill itself, so I just ported my number to google voice and have it linked to my work phone. I really want another Android phone, but I can live with the iPhone for now.

As a developer, I will also say this: Android devices are much easier to develop for than iOS devices. The Android platform is Java based, and iOS uses Apple's proprietary Objective-C. You can only do development work for iOS on a Mac, but you can do Android on all three major platforms. Apple's app approval process is a nightmare. Google's is much more developer friendly.

I am not saying one is better than other, I'm just pointing out what I, personally, like and dislike.

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Guest facelessman07

Your point would be better made if you put Goldeneye in there instead of Donkey Kong and Mario...

While Goldeneye was good it's no match to the two I put IMO

Also Turok 2

Man, nostalgia. Grew up on this lol

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Seeing as how I am in an almost identical situation as you OP, Ill throw in my 2 cents: True tech people tend to be bigger fans of Android than iOS.

Before I am crucified, let me explain what I mean by "True tech people". People that work in IT, that have experience and an understanding in the deeper aspects of "Computer Science" (ie. Software Developers and Computer Technicians) typically gravitate toward Android, as it has many more power user functions. Other people in IT (Project Managers, Business Analyst, Consultants) gravitate toward iOS. I'm not saying this is always the case, but it is the usual. I work in a team of 15 developers and everyone of us have an iPhone for our work phone and an Android for our personal device (except me, see below).

I have had a company issued iPhone 5s for almost a year now, and I and still not fond it. A few months ago my Galaxy S3 decided to kill itself, so I just ported my number to google voice and have it linked to my work phone. I really want another Android phone, but I can live with the iPhone for now.

As a developer, I will also say this: Android devices are much easier to develop for than iOS devices. The Android platform is Java based, and iOS uses Apple's proprietary Objective-C. You can only do development work for iOS on a Mac, but you can do Android on all three major platforms. Apple's app approval process is a nightmare. Google's is much more developer friendly.

I am not saying one is better than other, I'm just pointing out what I, personally, like and dislike.

A few things, why was computer science put in quotes and I do not believe I would put computer technicians into computer science. Also how is Objective-c proprietary? Anyone can download the Clang compiler from the llvm project and run objective-c code on their computer( windows and Linux included). The real difference is why would you want to. objective-c's object oriented aspect was influence by smalltalk, which has a completely different syntax than Java or C++ which took influence from simula 1. The reason I believe we do not see more objective-c development outside of iOS is because learning that C++ based syntax will help you learn Java as well as Csharp or even PHP and they have always been the more popular languages to develop using.

Also I think we should start seeing IT and CS as two separate things, but that is another conversation completely.

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A few things, why was computer science put in quotes and I do not believe I would put computer technicians into computer science. Also how is Objective-c proprietary? Anyone can download the Clang compiler from the llvm project and run objective-c code on their computer( windows and Linux included). The real difference is why would you want to. objective-c's object oriented aspect was influence by smalltalk, which has a completely different syntax than Java or C++ which took influence from simula 1. The reason I believe we do not see more objective-c development outside of iOS is because learning that C++ based syntax will help you learn Java as well as Csharp or even PHP and they have always been the more popular languages to develop using.

Also I think we should start seeing IT and CS as two separate things, but that is another conversation completely.

It was bad wording on my part. What I meant was, iOS is really the only modern OS that uses Objective C. In iOS, you are allowed to use more or less any language that will compile with the same object format as Xcode functions. As far as I know, you still can not use a Just-In-Time compiled language unless you pre-compile all binaries before submitting the code for review. This may have changed, as I have not done any iOS development in a few months. Either way, it discourages use of most other languages by developers.

I classified computer technicians in the same category because most (good) computer technicians have a more thorough understanding of hardware than any PM, BA, or Web designer in an IT org. Do they have the understanding to explain to me the difference between inheritance and polymorphism? Probably not. I am also speaking about a professional computer tech, not Billy Bob's computer repair shop. My company is actually one of the few that I have seen that requires a Bachelors degree for a technician. Perhaps a new trend?

Not really sure what you mean by "Also I think we should start seeing IT and CS as two separate things". Most any job family that could be classified as a computer science (ie. software/hardware development) is a only but a part of what makes up a proper IT organization for any major corporation. It doesn't make sense to separate them, as it is only one part of a total sum.

Edited by DirtyBirdKert
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