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this **** has been all over my instagram. I've seen better than this when I played in the streets. Alot of people probably don't even realize how easy it is for a defender to fall in a situation like that.

He didn't just fall he went flying

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Monday, February 16, 2015
Knicks waive Amar'e Stoudemire

By Ian Begley
ESPN.com

NEW YORK -- Amar'e Stoudemire says he's leaving the New York Knicks with a "heavy heart." Now he's looking for an opportunity to join a contender.

The Knicks announced on Monday afternoon that they have waived Stoudemire, who signed a five-year, $99.7 million contract with New York in July 2010.

Stoudemire, making $23.4 million this season, is expected to clear waivers on Wednesday at 5 p.m. ET and become a free agent.

"I feel truly blessed to have been able to play for the incredible New York fans, Mr. Dolan, my coaches, teammates and the entire Knicks organization for the past five years," Stoudemire said in a statement released by the team. "I will be forever grateful for the opportunity to contribute positively on the court and in the community.

"Although I leave the Knicks with a heavy heart, I wish the organization the best of luck. Once a Knick always a Knick."

Sources with knowledge of his thinking told ESPN on Monday that Stoudemire is leaning toward signing with the Dallas Mavericks. Another source told ESPNDallas.com that the Los Angeles Clippers and Phoenix Suns also have expressed interest.

Sources also say the Golden State Warriors, Memphis Grizzlies, Portland Trail Blazers and Cleveland Cavaliers -- all playoff contenders in the market for extra size -- ‎are not actively pursuing Stoudemire. The 6-foot-10 center is in his 13th NBA season and has averaged 12.0 points and 6.8 rebounds in 36 games for New York this season..

Stoudemire, 32, has stated a desire to compete for a championship. He posted a farewell message, written in the form of a poem on his Instagram account Monday.

Knicks president Phil Jackson said Stoudemire initiated the idea of leaving the team. He also praised Stoudemire for his effort over the past five seasons in New York.

"His time here should be marked by recognizing his effort -- it was 100 percent," Jackson said in a statement. "As we move forward in structuring this team, we will look for players that exhibit his desire to win."

Knicks general manager Steve Mills added that he appreciates Stoudemire's contributions.

"Everyone here at the Knicks organization appreciates the contribution Amar'e has made to the team and the entire City of New York over the past five seasons," Mills said. "We have developed a relationship that has translated into a long-term friendship, and it will continue through the remainder of his NBA career, and beyond."

Stoudemire leaves a mixed legacy in New York. The Knicks made the playoffs in Stoudemire's first three seasons but have regressed since.

Stoudemire, a six-time All-Star, has also been hampered by injuries throughout his Knicks tenure.

He missed 70 of the Knicks' 164 regular-season games from 2012-13 and 2013-14, sitting out mostly because of recurring knee issues. He had missed 14 of the previous 18 games this season -- because of ankle, wrist and knee injuries -- before returning in a Feb. 6 loss to the Brooklyn Nets.

The Mavs can offer Stoudemire only the veteran's minimum, but he likely would have a significant role off the bench as a candidate for minutes at power forward and center behind Dirk Nowitzki and Tyson Chandler.

"He would fit in great because we play a lot of pick-and-roll," Chandler, who played with Stoudemire in New York the past three seasons, said recently. "Coach [Rick Carlisle] does an excellent job understanding scorers and how to get them the ball and putting them in a position to succeed. Not only that, we've got the best training staff in the league. That also helps."

By parting ways with Stoudemire, the Knicks open up a roster spot. It is unclear whom they will sign, but some in the organization view Thanasis Antetokounmpo, the younger brother of Giannis Antetokounmpo, as the most NBA-ready prospect on its D-League team.

New York (10-43) may not be finished reshaping its roster this season.

According to sources, the Knicks have discussed moving point guards Pablo Prigioni and Jose Calderon. Veteran forward Andrea Bargnani, according to sources, is a candidate to be waived after Thursday's trade deadline, assuming the Knicks can't move him before that.

ESPN.com's Marc Stein and Tim MacMahon contributed to this report.

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Monday, February 16, 2015
Amar'e Stoudemire will join Mavs

By Tim MacMahon and Marc Stein
ESPN.com

DALLAS -- Amar'e Stoudemire has committed to joining the Dallas Mavericks, according to league sources, giving him a chance to compete for a championship and adding much-needed frontcourt depth to a Western Conference contender's bench.

Stoudemire, who negotiated a buyout with the New York Knicks over the weekend and was officially waived Monday, committed to the Mavs for the remainder of the season on Monday.

The contract will not become official until Stoudemire clears waivers on Wednesday at 5 p.m. ET, making him a free agent. His $23.4 million salary essentially makes the waivers process a mere formality.

RealGM.com earlier reported Stoudemire's commitment to the Mavs.

The Los Angeles Clippers and the Phoenix Suns were among the playoff contenders who expressed interest in Stoudemire, a six-time All-Star who averaged 12 points and 6.8 rebounds in 36 games with the Knicks this season.

However, as ESPN.com reported earlier this month, the Mavs were the front-runners for Stoudemire's services all along.

Stoudemire, 32, has stated a desire to compete for a championship and will get that opportunity with the Mavs, who are fifth in the West with a 36-19 record. That was his reason for requesting a buyout from the Knicks, who have the NBA's worst record at 10-43.

Counting on Amar'e to Fix 'Big' Problem

Amar'e Stoudemire could provide low-post presence off the bench for a Mavericks frontline that's gotten little to no help from its paper-thin reserves. Dallas' back-up bigs vs. Amar'e this season:

Mavs Stoudemire Points per 36 mins 13.6 18.8 Rebs per 36 mins 7.2 10.2 Blocks per 36 mins 1.4 1.4 --ESPN Stats & Information

"I feel truly blessed to have been able to play for the incredible New York fans, Mr. Dolan, my coaches, teammates and the entire Knicks organization for the past five years," Stoudemire said in a statement released by the team. "I will be forever grateful for the opportunity to contribute positively on the court and in the community.

"Although I leave the Knicks with a heavy heart, I wish the organization the best of luck. Once a Knick always a Knick."

The Mavs could only offer the prorated veteran's minimum to Stoudemire, who was in the final season of a five-year, $99.7 million deal with the Knicks.

Dallas was attractive to Stoudmire in part because of a pick-and-roll-intensive offense that plays to his strengths. The Mavs also have a highly respected medical staff, led by Team USA athletic trainer Casey Smith, that will maximize Stoudemire's chances of staying healthy for the stretch run and playoffs while dealing with chronic knee problems.

The Mavs envision Stoudemire as a key bench player who will back up center Tyson Chandler and also see spot duty at power forward behind Dirk Nowitzki. He will provide the Mavs with a quality replacement for Brandan Wright, the high-efficiency reserve big man the Mavs gave up in the December deal to acquire Rajon Rondo.

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Wednesday, February 18, 2015
Updated: February 19, 8:10 AM ET

Jerome Kersey dies at 52

ESPN.com news services

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Jerome Kersey, a fan favorite during his decade-plus career with the Portland Trail Blazers and a veteran of 17 NBA seasons, died Wednesday. He was 52.

nba_g_kersey_300x300.jpgJerome Kersey, pictured during a 1986 game, was a popular Blazers forward. His NBA career spanned 1984-2001.

The Trail Blazers confirmed that Kersey had died, but didn't provide details. A team ambassador, Kersey appeared Tuesday with fellow former Blazers Terry Porter and Brian Grant at Madison High School in Portland in celebration of African American History Month.

"Today we lost an incredible person and one of the most beloved players to ever wear a Trail Blazers uniform," Blazers owner Paul Allen said in a statement. "My thoughts and condolences are with the Kersey family. He will be missed by all of us. It's a terrible loss."

Kersey, a 6-foot-7 small forward, was a starter on Portland's 1990 and 1992 NBA Finals teams. He was a second-round draft pick in 1984 and spent his first 11 seasons in Portland, playing alongside the likes of Hall of Famer Clyde Drexler, Kiki Vandeweghe and Porter. Kersey played for five other NBA teams, winning a championship with San Antonio in 1999. He retired from the NBA in 2001.

"It is so sad," Drexler told Comcast Sports Northwest upon hearing the news. "It is a huge loss for the Portland community. He was the greatest guy, the nicest friend, teammate and brother. He was loved by everyone. We will all miss him. He just cared so much. This is unbelievable."

At the time of his retirement, Kersey ranked second on the Blazers' all-time list in games played (831) and rebounds (5,078), and third in blocked shots (621) and steals (1,059). All told, he played in 1,153 NBA games for Portland, Golden State, the Lakers, Seattle, San Antonio and Milwaukee, averaging 10.3 points and 5.5 rebounds.

Trail Blazers guard Damian Lillard took to Twitter to express his sadness at Kersey's death:

Others who posted their condolences included Kobe Bryant and Vince Carter.

Prior to his NBA career, Kersey was a two-time National Association of Basketball Coaches Division II All-American at Longwood College, where he was a four-year starter.

He was the greatest guy, the nicest friend, teammate and brother. He was loved by everyone. We will all miss him. He just cared so much.

- Clyde Drexler, on Trail Blazers teammate Jerome Kersey

Kersey also coached in the NBA as an assistant with the Bucks under Porter in 2004-05. Early in his retirement he served as an assistant with the Blazers' summer league team. In addition to serving as a team ambassador, he also appeared on Blazers broadcasts for Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

Bill Schonely, who was the Blazers' play-by-play radio announcer for 28 seasons, told The Oregonian that he had run into Kersey earlier Wednesday morning at the team's offices.

"He just had a knee operation on Monday,'' Schonely told the paper. "He had told me he was going to have to be on crutches, so I gave him a hard time today and asked him, 'Where are the crutches?' He said his knee was a little sore, but he said he didn't need them.''

Kersey lived with his wife, Teri, in Lake Oswego, Oregon. He had four daughters.

"The news is so sudden, and we're sure more details will be forthcoming,'' Blazers president Chris McGowan said. "But it is indeed a sad day for our organization, the city of Portland and the NBA. Jerome will be remembered not only for his incredible contributions on the court, but his tremendous impact in our community.''

The Blazers franchise lost beloved Hall of Fame coach Dr. Jack Ramsay in 2014 and popular center Kevin Duckworth in 2008. Duckworth was 44 at the time of his death.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Wednesday, February 18, 2015
Nuggets put Ty Lawson up for trade

By Chris Broussard
ESPN The Magazine

The Denver Nuggets are looking to move point guard Ty Lawson, and coach Brian Shaw would like to have Indiana point guard George Hill as his replacement, according to league sources.

With a 20-33 record and on the verge of missing the playoffs for the second straight season, the Nuggets are one of the league's most active teams heading into Thursday's trade deadline.

Sources say the club's desperation is illustrated by its willingness to move Lawson, its leader in scoring (16.9 points per game), assists (10.1) and steals (1.3).

Despite Lawson's production, he and Shaw have had trouble getting on the same page, and sources say Shaw would prefer to trade him for Hill because Hill can play at both a fast and slow tempo and is a strong defender. While an assistant coach in Indiana from 2011 to '13, Shaw mentored Hill and grew close to him.

"Brian loves George," said a league executive who is close to Shaw.

It is not clear whether Indiana is willing to part with Hill in a trade that would feature Lawson, but the Pacers' front office, led by Larry Bird, was high on Lawson when he entered the 2009 draft out of North Carolina. The Pacers considered taking Lawson with the 13th pick but instead chose his college teammate Tyler Hansbrough.

The Boston Celtics also are interested in Lawson, according to sources.

Lawson missed Wednesday's Nuggets practice in Denver, the team's first since the All-Star break, because of what he called "derailed" travel plans. Shaw said he will look into Lawson's reason before deciding whether discipline is warranted, and added that holding Lawson out of the starting lineup Friday against Milwaukee is a possibility.

Lawson took to Instagram to address his absence, posting a photo and this explanation: "Travel plans got derailed ....but I'm always ready to go war with my bros... I know the season hasn't gone the we all wanted to but I'm a nugget until the day I die."

In addition to Lawson, the Nuggets are looking to move several other players. They've had extensive talks with clubs about Arron Afflalo, who many league executives believe will be dealt to Portland, Wilson Chandler and Jameer Nelson. They also have tried to move J.J. Hickson and JaVale McGee but have found no takers thus far.

Shaw, in his second season in Denver, is already rumored to be on the hot seat. He admittedly has had trouble getting through to the players on this year's roster, and some league executives believe that is a major reason the Nuggets are trying to move so many of their players.

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Id be more than fine with Crawford for cheap.

Contrary to popular belief we need another bench shooter.

Playoffs come around and our bench is Dennis, baze, Thabo, Scott, and antic.

Only 2 of those guys can be counted to hit a 3, and Scott is sporadic with it.

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Marc Stein @ESPNSteinLine 2m2 minutes ago

Hearing Denver has been seeking a future first-rounder AND second-rounder for Arron Afflalo. And two first-rounders for Wilson Chandler ..

Marc Stein @ESPNSteinLine 2m2 minutes ago

But now that trade deadline less than six hours away, let's see if Denver prices go down. As it stands: Afflalo still more likely to move

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I agree WOR a shooter off the bench is definitely necessary if we are going to stay the course and not go after a rebounder because they are going to need to keep making shots so rebounding is a non-factor.

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I have no idea what they might want for Craw but for discussions sake....

Ray Allen for free (no guarantee he picks us but lets say hypothetically) vs J. Crawford for a 2nd and Jenkins? I'm honestly torn. Add to the fact that Ray may very well go Cleveland and I say if the Hawks get a deal they like they should pull the trigger.

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Ten players who might entice last-minute trades

Only players in certain situations are likely deadline bait


POSTED: Feb 18, 2015 8:22 PM ET

ShaunPowell.png BY SHAUN POWELL

Deadline Day. Who's staying? Who's going? Who knows?

It's always a strange, tangled and complicated time when the NBA is suddenly on the shot-clock with regard to trades. This day is really about last-minute buyers and sellers; the real reconstruction, or construction, of teams happens in the summer when the draft and free agency is thrown into the mix.

The only players moved on trade day are those who (a) are salary dumps, (cool.png are "final pieces" for title contenders, © are expiring contracts or (d) are threatening to walk as free agents in the summer and therefore their current teams are panicking and trying to get something, anything, while they can.

And on that last note: Goran Dragic, anyone?

There is another component: The buyout. Certain teams who are handcuffed by the salary-cap can only add players on the cheap and must sit tight, like vultures, waiting for teams to cut loose players who are unwanted. The Knicks started early with Amar'e Stoudemire, now with the Mavericks, and others will most certainly follow. The one intriguing name in this regard is soon-to-be-ex-Bucks center Larry Sanders, accused pot smoker whose immediate future is, ahem, hazy.

That said, here are 10 of the most-discussed players leading up to the deadline and why they might be a good value:

Arron Afflalo. Two years ago there was some debate about him making the All-Star Game. At that time, Afflalo was averaging roughly 21 a game in Orlando in what became the best season of his career. Since then? Well, here in his second stint with the Nuggets, his shooting, scoring, rebounds and assists are all down, which suggests he could've been putting up nice numbers on lousy Magic teams. Still, he's young (29) and signed through next season at a reasonable $7.5 million. Anyone in the market for a big guard coming off the bench should and will be interested in what the Nuggets are asking.

Ty Lawson. You know things are crummy in Denver when the Nuggets have their finger on the red button and are willing to listen to offers for their best player, by far. If Lawson stays in Denver beyond the deadline it's because the price was too steep. The Nuggets are looking for a package of players and picks for Lawson and ordinarily he might be worth it. Problem is, point guard is a position of strength right now. Few teams are desperate for one, even one as good as Lawson, who can score despite his size (5-11) and also dish with the best. The Pelicans, Kings, Pacers and Lakers could be destinations.

Reggie Jackson. He's a hyper player who can score and an ideal backup toRussell Westbrook, but will be a restricted free agent this summer. If OKC is confident it can retain Jackson then it's very likely he'll stay. But if the Thunder feel he'll push them over the luxury tax, they might try to swap him for cheaper options. Remember, they'll need to pay Kevin Durant in two summers.

GameTime: Latest on Dragic

Stu and David discuss the latest on Goran Dragic's desire to be traded before the end of the season.

Goran Dragic. Easily, he's the biggest talent on the block, a point guard who, in the right situation, could significantly bolster a contender or quicken the progress of a rebuilding team. The fine print says Dragic will command a pretty penny as a free agent this summer, perhaps in the $15 million range. And a half-dozen potential suitors would be OK with that. He's 28 and still in his prime, can get to the rim and is almost impossible to stop when he's going to his left. Plenty of coaches would be comfortable with Dragic running the offense. But Dragic would need to give a verbal commitment to sign with any team interested in him, because nobody will surrender valuable assets for a two-month rental. Free agency has given him leverage in this trade, and Dragic can almost dictate where he'll go. He'd be a good compliment to Carmelo Anthony in New York and Kobe Bryant in LA if only because those players respect his game and realize they might not get a better teammate this quickly. The Celtics would love him, too.

Isaiah Thomas. Look, if you're the Suns, wouldn't it make sense to do whatever possible to keep Dragic and trade the guy who's making him unhappy instead? If they can patch things up with Dragic, who said yesterday that he doesn't trust the Suns' front office anymore, then they'll go this route. Thomas was signed last summer only as insurance against Eric Bledsoe, who held out for months before finally agreeing to a deal and suddenly the Suns had too much wealth at point guard. Seriously: Dragic, Bledsoe, Thomas, Archie Goodwin and rookie Tyler Ennis, who Suns insiders say is turning out better than expected but can't get on the floor? Yeah, a bit much. Thomas would be a nice change-of-pace point guard for a number of teams. Of course, there's a matter of compensation. The Suns would be thrilled to get a conditional first-rounder, but most likely, a backup-plus-second rounder seems more reasonable. Finally, Thomas isn't going anywhere if Dragic insists on leaving Phoenix. He's a strong contender for best sixth man.

Brandon Bass. There are a handful of players whose true value lie in their expiring contracts and it seems they all play for the Celtics. Besides Bass there'sTayshaun Prince; in addition to their short contracts they might still have enough juice left to contribute to a team for the rest of the season. Celtics GM Danny Ainge, loaded with extra draft picks and bolstered by cap space, could package Bass or Prince with a pick (or two) to help push along the rebuilding pace in Boston.

Kevin Garnett. At this stage in his career, his snarl is a lot more dangerous than his bite. But he's on an expiring deal and a few contending teams, perhaps led by the Clippers and old friend Doc Rivers, could use his experience down the stretch. The problem for Brooklyn: KG has a no-trade clause. Also: Nobody will give anything more than a second-rounder, if that, because teams are waiting for the Nets to simply buy out KG and get him for nothing.

Enes Kanter. His playing time cut by Rudy Gobert, as well as his ego, Kanter wants out of Utah. He'll be a restricted free agent this summer and the Jazz might decide to move him now if they can get a decent price. Kanter has always been somewhat of an enigma, a player with good size (6-11, 245) and youth (22) and decent skills but hasn't been able to string together a consistent stretch of games or even a month. Or maybe the Jazz are just too enamored at this point with Gobert, who's three inches taller and a far better defender at the rim. Seeing how functional big men are in demand, and given his age, Kanter should attract some activity.

Gary Neal. Wasn't it like, yesterday, when Neal was a valuable sub off the bench who dropped some big shots from deep against LeBron and the Heat in the Finals? Well, the Spurs let him walk out of San Antonio as a free agent two summers ago, gave his spot to Patty Mills and never missed a beat. Meanwhile, Neal struggled in Milwaukee, then in Charlotte and a few weeks ago landed in Minnesota with an uncertain role. The logical place for Neal could be in Atlanta where the Hawks could use depth at guard and are coached by Mike Budenholzer, who was an assistant in San Antonio.

Channing Frye. Can someone explain why the Magic gave Frye a contract (4 years, $32 million) last summer that surprised people, only to decrease his minutes every month this season? Maybe this was the undoing of Jacque Vaughn, now the ex-Magic coach. If Frye is no longer the right fit in Orlando, the Magic should cut him loose now, before he ages. He could have value to a few other teams as a stretch-forward, the role he did very well in Phoenix.

Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him onTwitter.

Don't know how I would feel about Neal!!

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Ten players who might entice last-minute trades

Only players in certain situations are likely deadline bait

POSTED: Feb 18, 2015 8:22 PM ET

ShaunPowell.png BY SHAUN POWELL

Deadline Day. Who's staying? Who's going? Who knows?

It's always a strange, tangled and complicated time when the NBA is suddenly on the shot-clock with regard to trades. This day is really about last-minute buyers and sellers; the real reconstruction, or construction, of teams happens in the summer when the draft and free agency is thrown into the mix.

The only players moved on trade day are those who (a) are salary dumps, (cool.png are "final pieces" for title contenders, © are expiring contracts or (d) are threatening to walk as free agents in the summer and therefore their current teams are panicking and trying to get something, anything, while they can.

And on that last note: Goran Dragic, anyone?

There is another component: The buyout. Certain teams who are handcuffed by the salary-cap can only add players on the cheap and must sit tight, like vultures, waiting for teams to cut loose players who are unwanted. The Knicks started early with Amar'e Stoudemire, now with the Mavericks, and others will most certainly follow. The one intriguing name in this regard is soon-to-be-ex-Bucks center Larry Sanders, accused pot smoker whose immediate future is, ahem, hazy.

That said, here are 10 of the most-discussed players leading up to the deadline and why they might be a good value:

Arron Afflalo. Two years ago there was some debate about him making the All-Star Game. At that time, Afflalo was averaging roughly 21 a game in Orlando in what became the best season of his career. Since then? Well, here in his second stint with the Nuggets, his shooting, scoring, rebounds and assists are all down, which suggests he could've been putting up nice numbers on lousy Magic teams. Still, he's young (29) and signed through next season at a reasonable $7.5 million. Anyone in the market for a big guard coming off the bench should and will be interested in what the Nuggets are asking.

Ty Lawson. You know things are crummy in Denver when the Nuggets have their finger on the red button and are willing to listen to offers for their best player, by far. If Lawson stays in Denver beyond the deadline it's because the price was too steep. The Nuggets are looking for a package of players and picks for Lawson and ordinarily he might be worth it. Problem is, point guard is a position of strength right now. Few teams are desperate for one, even one as good as Lawson, who can score despite his size (5-11) and also dish with the best. The Pelicans, Kings, Pacers and Lakers could be destinations.

Reggie Jackson. He's a hyper player who can score and an ideal backup toRussell Westbrook, but will be a restricted free agent this summer. If OKC is confident it can retain Jackson then it's very likely he'll stay. But if the Thunder feel he'll push them over the luxury tax, they might try to swap him for cheaper options. Remember, they'll need to pay Kevin Durant in two summers.

GameTime: Latest on Dragic

Stu and David discuss the latest on Goran Dragic's desire to be traded before the end of the season.

Goran Dragic. Easily, he's the biggest talent on the block, a point guard who, in the right situation, could significantly bolster a contender or quicken the progress of a rebuilding team. The fine print says Dragic will command a pretty penny as a free agent this summer, perhaps in the $15 million range. And a half-dozen potential suitors would be OK with that. He's 28 and still in his prime, can get to the rim and is almost impossible to stop when he's going to his left. Plenty of coaches would be comfortable with Dragic running the offense. But Dragic would need to give a verbal commitment to sign with any team interested in him, because nobody will surrender valuable assets for a two-month rental. Free agency has given him leverage in this trade, and Dragic can almost dictate where he'll go. He'd be a good compliment to Carmelo Anthony in New York and Kobe Bryant in LA if only because those players respect his game and realize they might not get a better teammate this quickly. The Celtics would love him, too.

Isaiah Thomas. Look, if you're the Suns, wouldn't it make sense to do whatever possible to keep Dragic and trade the guy who's making him unhappy instead? If they can patch things up with Dragic, who said yesterday that he doesn't trust the Suns' front office anymore, then they'll go this route. Thomas was signed last summer only as insurance against Eric Bledsoe, who held out for months before finally agreeing to a deal and suddenly the Suns had too much wealth at point guard. Seriously: Dragic, Bledsoe, Thomas, Archie Goodwin and rookie Tyler Ennis, who Suns insiders say is turning out better than expected but can't get on the floor? Yeah, a bit much. Thomas would be a nice change-of-pace point guard for a number of teams. Of course, there's a matter of compensation. The Suns would be thrilled to get a conditional first-rounder, but most likely, a backup-plus-second rounder seems more reasonable. Finally, Thomas isn't going anywhere if Dragic insists on leaving Phoenix. He's a strong contender for best sixth man.

Brandon Bass. There are a handful of players whose true value lie in their expiring contracts and it seems they all play for the Celtics. Besides Bass there'sTayshaun Prince; in addition to their short contracts they might still have enough juice left to contribute to a team for the rest of the season. Celtics GM Danny Ainge, loaded with extra draft picks and bolstered by cap space, could package Bass or Prince with a pick (or two) to help push along the rebuilding pace in Boston.

Kevin Garnett. At this stage in his career, his snarl is a lot more dangerous than his bite. But he's on an expiring deal and a few contending teams, perhaps led by the Clippers and old friend Doc Rivers, could use his experience down the stretch. The problem for Brooklyn: KG has a no-trade clause. Also: Nobody will give anything more than a second-rounder, if that, because teams are waiting for the Nets to simply buy out KG and get him for nothing.

Enes Kanter. His playing time cut by Rudy Gobert, as well as his ego, Kanter wants out of Utah. He'll be a restricted free agent this summer and the Jazz might decide to move him now if they can get a decent price. Kanter has always been somewhat of an enigma, a player with good size (6-11, 245) and youth (22) and decent skills but hasn't been able to string together a consistent stretch of games or even a month. Or maybe the Jazz are just too enamored at this point with Gobert, who's three inches taller and a far better defender at the rim. Seeing how functional big men are in demand, and given his age, Kanter should attract some activity.

Gary Neal. Wasn't it like, yesterday, when Neal was a valuable sub off the bench who dropped some big shots from deep against LeBron and the Heat in the Finals? Well, the Spurs let him walk out of San Antonio as a free agent two summers ago, gave his spot to Patty Mills and never missed a beat. Meanwhile, Neal struggled in Milwaukee, then in Charlotte and a few weeks ago landed in Minnesota with an uncertain role. The logical place for Neal could be in Atlanta where the Hawks could use depth at guard and are coached by Mike Budenholzer, who was an assistant in San Antonio.

Channing Frye. Can someone explain why the Magic gave Frye a contract (4 years, $32 million) last summer that surprised people, only to decrease his minutes every month this season? Maybe this was the undoing of Jacque Vaughn, now the ex-Magic coach. If Frye is no longer the right fit in Orlando, the Magic should cut him loose now, before he ages. He could have value to a few other teams as a stretch-forward, the role he did very well in Phoenix.

Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him onTwitter.

Don't know how I would feel about Neal!!

That had been the consensus mostly like addition if we made a move for a while now. Fits our system perfectly but his stroke is cold right now. Still coming to new team and city and actually contending for something may get him back to his San Antonio self

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We should have never let crawdog walk.

At the time I think we were still laboring under the delusion that we were anticipating having to pay Smoove dry.png while still having some pretty terrible contracts on the books

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