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My Choices For Hc


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Because Rex Ryan has taken the Jets to AFCCG twice with Mark Sanchez but apparently that's all this board needs to know.

nobody questions rex ryan's ability to coach (or at least they shouldnt)...but rex certainly looks for trouble and like to have the camera on him at all times

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There is one other type I do not like as a choice for head coach and that is former players with notable careers in the NFL. It is has been my observation that for whatever reasons, players that had moderate to great NFL careers just do not do well as head coaches. In fact, their failure rate may be up there with college coaches that jump straight to head coaching in the NFL. Mike Ditka is probably the most successful one, but the list of failures is long.

So, like I mentioned in earlier posts, there is a history of coaching hires that gives one the best candidates based on success and failure rates of the particular route that lead them to head coach in the NFL.

The best options:

· A coordinator from a team with a consistent, competitive history, with a at least one Super Bowl championship. This person will have started his coaching career in the NFL as an assistant. He may or may not have NFL playing experience, but his career in the NFL would not be considered notable. He must be an assistant coach in the NFL first. This means he may have started his coaching career as an NFL assistant or moved from the college ranks to an assistant in the NFL first. This list would be the longest, but among the coaches found this way include Vince Lombardi, Don Shula, Sean Payton, Chuck Knoll, Bill Belichick, Joe Gibbs, Tom Landry, Mike Tomlin, Mike Holmgren, Marv Levy, Bill Cowher, Mike Holmgren, John Harbaugh, Dan Reeves, and Bill Parcells. I would be remiss if I did not mention our favorite former Falcons coach, Leeman Bennett, was picked from the staff of our successful nemesis the Los Angeles Rams.

· A successful college head coach that has experience in the NFL. This means that before they had their success at the college level, they were a coach in the NFL as either head coach, coordinator or top assistant. I would not approve of even the most successful college coach being directly hired as an NFL head coach, however, there is some history of coaches coming from college with previous NFL experience being successful. These include Bill Walsh and Pete Carroll. David Shaw or Nick Saban would fall in this category as potential candidates. The exceptions to this rule, of course, are Jimmy Johnson, and to a lesser extent **** Vermeil, and Vermeil only won his Super Bowl after returning to the NFL for a second stint. Barry Switzer does not count at all. He coached a team so talented it would have been hard not to win the Super Bowl.

The worst options.

· Former or current head coaches with a losing record. The record should speak for itself, because I cannot find any history of a coach with a losing record going on to be successful. This also includes promoting assistants that are under that coach.

Former or current head coaches who have won Super Bowls. They rarely, if ever, duplicate that success. Their career has climaxed, so to speak, and probably just lack the hunger they had earlier.

· Any college coach being hired directly as head coach in the NFL without any previous NFL experience. This category has a high failure rate and includes Steve Spurrier, Nick Saban, Lou Holtz, Lane Kiffin, Rich Brooks, John Mckay, Dennis Erikson, Butch Davis, and our own Bobby Petrino.

· Any former star NFL players. As I mentioned, for whatever reason, history shows former players, with notable careers, make bad head coaches. This list includes Bart Starr, Norm Van Brocklin, Mike Singletary, Jim Zorn, and Romeo Crennel.

Now, nothing is absolute, and this is all just my opinion born of watching years of NFL football. As one can see, there have been successful head coaches pulled from many places. Yet, there are routes that have a higher success rate than others.

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I see his name thrown around a lot here...... but I have to ask...WHY?

Yeah the Seahawks win the super bowl in 2012 and had a great defense but they have declined considerably this year despite losing no one in the front 7

I think everyone here would say the Hawks defense is more talented overall on defense but why are they actually worse than us in several areas?

For example as bad as we look on third down........ they are worse ( opponents convert 46% vs us and 47% v them

Their much much more vaunted secondary has given up 4 more tds than ours has in 1 fewer game

They are allowing a qb rating of basically 104 vs us allowing a qb rating of 97

They are allowing a 68% completion % vs a 65% for us

We have 4 ints and they have 2....and for all the bluster about us not getting sacks the falcons and the hawks have the EXACT same sack total. ( in more pass attempts

Now granted their run D has been pretty much leaps as bounds better but...... Do you really want a guy who has taken one of the supposed most talent secondaries in the history of the league and pulled them down to all in all being a worse pass defense then the falcons have now????

I'm using the same argument that those of you who seem to want to retain Smith/Dimitroff use...

Look at Quinn's entire body of work.

You can't use that line of logic for who you want to retain and then abandon it for someone else others want to attain.

And the Seahawks won the 2014 Superbowl following the 2013 season so you're off by a year.

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And no on Sean Payton. Not because he is a Saint, because he has already won a Super Bowl. Again, it is just not a successful route to take. Just like players, so many things go into a coach succeeding with a particular team, to expect them to duplicate that with a different team is more wishful thinking then something that can be realistically expected.

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Here's more on Dan Quinn:

“He just took it to another level,” said Seahawks offensive line coach Tom Cable, the former Raiders head coach. “That speaks volumes about Dan and what he’s doing. I think when you come in with some freshness and a fresher voice, sometimes it’s a boost and I think that’s exactly what’s happened. Just kind of a new thought, new brain, new voice and here we go. A bunch of good players, too.”

This isn’t Quinn’s first go-round in the NFL, or even in Seattle for that matter. He was the defensive line coach there from ’09-10 before joining Will Muschamp at Florida to get the coordinator experience he was lacking; he had previously worked with Muschamp on Saban’s Dolphins staff from ’05-06. Quinn also had stints with the 49ers (Mariucci) and Jets (Eric Mangini) before landing with Pete Carroll. That’s when Quinn’s enthusiastic coaching style found its soul mate in Carroll’s jacked and pumped persona.

“He’s always enthused and always pumped for the pass rushers, because obviously he’s an ex-defensive line coach,” end Cliff Avril said of Quinn. “He’s real active and he’s not your typical coach when he’s out there. He’s active doing all kinds of hand drills [with oversized mitts] and all these different things. I think that’s pretty cool.”

Schematically, Quinn has made the Seahawks more aggressive by becoming even more of a man-to-man defense on the outside; Seattle usually zones the middle of the field. Though he said that was a staff-wide decision in the offseason, he’s still the one calling the plays.

“We wanted to play as aggressively as we could because of the style of players that we had,” Quinn said. “It was more just a function of adding that to what we do. And then the numbers were looking good as far as playing man to man, so we wanted to stick with that.”

Quinn also drew high marks from all of his players for his desire to listen and his willingness to implement their ideas.

“The best part is the freewill that we have to make adjustments that we see, and Dan does a great job of listening to what the players say,” said end Michael Bennett. “A lot of coaches don’t like what the players say, but the player is in the game, so the player knows exactly what is going on.”

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Here's more on Dan Quinn:

“He just took it to another level,” said Seahawks offensive line coach Tom Cable, the former Raiders head coach. “That speaks volumes about Dan and what he’s doing. I think when you come in with some freshness and a fresher voice, sometimes it’s a boost and I think that’s exactly what’s happened. Just kind of a new thought, new brain, new voice and here we go. A bunch of good players, too.”

This isn’t Quinn’s first go-round in the NFL, or even in Seattle for that matter. He was the defensive line coach there from ’09-10 before joining Will Muschamp at Florida to get the coordinator experience he was lacking; he had previously worked with Muschamp on Saban’s Dolphins staff from ’05-06. Quinn also had stints with the 49ers (Mariucci) and Jets (Eric Mangini) before landing with Pete Carroll. That’s when Quinn’s enthusiastic coaching style found its soul mate in Carroll’s jacked and pumped persona.

“He’s always enthused and always pumped for the pass rushers, because obviously he’s an ex-defensive line coach,” end Cliff Avril said of Quinn. “He’s real active and he’s not your typical coach when he’s out there. He’s active doing all kinds of hand drills [with oversized mitts] and all these different things. I think that’s pretty cool.”

Schematically, Quinn has made the Seahawks more aggressive by becoming even more of a man-to-man defense on the outside; Seattle usually zones the middle of the field. Though he said that was a staff-wide decision in the offseason, he’s still the one calling the plays.

“We wanted to play as aggressively as we could because of the style of players that we had,” Quinn said. “It was more just a function of adding that to what we do. And then the numbers were looking good as far as playing man to man, so we wanted to stick with that.”

Quinn also drew high marks from all of his players for his desire to listen and his willingness to implement their ideas.

“The best part is the freewill that we have to make adjustments that we see, and Dan does a great job of listening to what the players say,” said end Michael Bennett. “A lot of coaches don’t like what the players say, but the player is in the game, so the player knows exactly what is going on.”

I believe you may be onto something here. He definitely meets most of the criteria I like in a potential candidate. He is the coordinator of a stifling defense for a Super Bowl champion team. He has worked quite a years in the NFL. My only reservation is I would like a little longer track record. Meaning, I would like him to have been coordinator a little longer to see if Seattle is consistent in winning and if his defense stays so dominant.

Do not misunderstand me though. That defense was a big reason Seattle won it all, and I would love to see that here. Dimitroff would have to be gone, however, because he does not seem inclined to build such a dominant defense, seeing how we have a former defensive coordinator as coach and yet have no defense.biggrin.png

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I dont want a college HC, all the ones who can be NFL HC are coaching in the NFL right now. I dont want a OC/DC thats in the NFL right now- we just came from that. I want a proven NFL coach that know how to evaluate talent. Give me REX and second choice Harbaugh

People would be wanting Ryan out of here in 2 years max and Harbaugh is a mental case.

No thanks to both.

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I believe you may be onto something here. He definitely meets most of the criteria I like in a potential candidate. He is the coordinator of a stifling defense for a Super Bowl champion team. He has worked quite a years in the NFL. My only reservation is I would like a little longer track record. Meaning, I would like him to have been coordinator a little longer to see if Seattle is consistent in winning and if his defense stays so dominant.

Do not misunderstand me though. That defense was a big reason Seattle won it all, and I would love to see that here. Dimitroff would have to be gone, however, because he does not seem inclined to build such a dominant defense, seeing how we have a former defensive coordinator as coach and yet have no defense.biggrin.png

Good points.

Obviously anybody the Falcons get is going to be a crapshoot to a certain degree...I also like John Pagano, DC for the Chargers and Todd Bowles, DC for the Cardinals.

I'm just tired of seeing the Falcons throw weak defenses out there year after year after year. For whatever reason Smith, a former defensive coordinator himself, hasn't been able to put a good defense out on the field.

I don't think the experience with Smith should make Blank shy away from another DC who more than likely will insist upon having a strong defense for the team he is the head coach for.

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I say John Fox.

No John Fox makes Mike Smith look like a reckless radical guru.

Th Broncos are great despite John Fox, he's probably the most conservative coach in the game. If Elway and Manning wasn't pulling his strings, the Broncos wouldn't be prolific. He's way too cautious

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You guys honestly believe that Sean Payton would consider coming here after all he's done for NO? That would be like Drew Brees signing with the Falcons, or Joe Montana signing with the Cowboys, Jordan signing with the Pistons, Jimmy Johnson coaching the 9ers or Bill Cowher wanting to coach the Ravens. Sean Payton will go down as the greatest coach in Saints history, and you guys want to bring him to the organization he has given **** to the last decade?

Neither Blank nor the majority of the fan base is that desperate.

Yeah it would be like Brett Favre becoming a Viking!

This is a business, 95% of people in the NFL don't hold grudges like that. If we gave him the best offer he'd come here.

Still don't want him in any way, but i don't think he'd have a problem with coming over here if it meant the biggest $$$. He'd probably want to spite the Ain'ts if they fire him too.

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Yeah it would be like Brett Favre becoming a Viking!

This is a business, 95% of people in the NFL don't hold grudges like that. If we gave him the best offer he'd come here.

Still don't want him in any way, but i don't think he'd have a problem with coming over here if it meant the biggest $$$. He'd probably want to spite the Ain'ts if they fire him too.

Brett was simply desperate for another championship, he had no honor ESPECIALLY with how the organization treated him his last season there. NO took care of Payton and the respect will always be neutral.

Sean Payton will not come here... Unless they offer him a stupid amount of money and Blank isn't about to do that for Payton.

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Brett was simply desperate for another championship, he had no honor ESPECIALLY with how the organization treated him his last season there. NO took care of Payton and the respect will always be neutral.

Sean Payton will not come here... Unless they offer him a stupid amount of money and Blank isn't about to do that for Payton.

Lol and you think Payton has 'Honour'? Where have you been the past forever? And the fact NO would have to Fire Payton for this to even be possible in the first place should tell you things will end on a sour note for him too, just like Favre.
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Here's more on Dan Quinn:

“He just took it to another level,” said Seahawks offensive line coach Tom Cable, the former Raiders head coach. “That speaks volumes about Dan and what he’s doing. I think when you come in with some freshness and a fresher voice, sometimes it’s a boost and I think that’s exactly what’s happened. Just kind of a new thought, new brain, new voice and here we go. A bunch of good players, too.”

This isn’t Quinn’s first go-round in the NFL, or even in Seattle for that matter. He was the defensive line coach there from ’09-10 before joining Will Muschamp at Florida to get the coordinator experience he was lacking; he had previously worked with Muschamp on Saban’s Dolphins staff from ’05-06. Quinn also had stints with the 49ers (Mariucci) and Jets (Eric Mangini) before landing with Pete Carroll. That’s when Quinn’s enthusiastic coaching style found its soul mate in Carroll’s jacked and pumped persona.

“He’s always enthused and always pumped for the pass rushers, because obviously he’s an ex-defensive line coach,” end Cliff Avril said of Quinn. “He’s real active and he’s not your typical coach when he’s out there. He’s active doing all kinds of hand drills [with oversized mitts] and all these different things. I think that’s pretty cool.”

Schematically, Quinn has made the Seahawks more aggressive by becoming even more of a man-to-man defense on the outside; Seattle usually zones the middle of the field. Though he said that was a staff-wide decision in the offseason, he’s still the one calling the plays.

“We wanted to play as aggressively as we could because of the style of players that we had,” Quinn said. “It was more just a function of adding that to what we do. And then the numbers were looking good as far as playing man to man, so we wanted to stick with that.”

Quinn also drew high marks from all of his players for his desire to listen and his willingness to implement their ideas.

“The best part is the freewill that we have to make adjustments that we see, and Dan does a great job of listening to what the players say,” said end Michael Bennett. “A lot of coaches don’t like what the players say, but the player is in the game, so the player knows exactly what is going on.”

That's the type of stuff that I love to hear.

I'm a strong believer in tailoring a defensive scheme to the players', and not forcing players to fit the defensive scheme.

Sadly, Smith and Nolan are currently forcing players to play out of position and out of their comfort zones just to honor the scheme. I hate that so much.

Dan Quinn is definitely at the top of my list.

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Guest facelessman07

No to Quinn, I don't like his aggressive philosophy or enthusiastic coaching style. I also don't like how they're running man to man with the corners. And never mind the horrible fact that he actually listens to his players and uses some of their ideas

NO NO NO!!

Lol

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Guest facelessman07

I think this team would benefit more from an offensive head coach. Fire koetter and smith. Let Nolan have one more year under a different hc

Won't be popular but unless we could get Rex as DC, which prolly wouldn't happen, I'd love to keep Nolan around.

People lay most of the defensive blame on him when this is pretty much the same scheme we've been running since Smith got here. This is not a Nolan D at all

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I dont want a college HC, all the ones who can be NFL HC are coaching in the NFL right now. I dont want a OC/DC thats in the NFL right now- we just came from that. I want a proven NFL coach that know how to evaluate talent. Give me REX and second choice Harbaugh

When's the last time a retread worked?
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