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Perception Is Reality - Agree Or Disagree?


Falcon Man™
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http://www.mscareergirl.com/2010/08/10/perception-is-reality/

“Perception is reality.” What does this mean to you professionally?

Let’s be clear, the way people view you and the work that you do is the legacy you will leave behind. Every day as we interact with others both personally and professionally, we leave an impression. As you go about the business of conducting your life people make judgments about your character, your appearance and your abilities. Even your paper trail (i.e. resumes, credit reports and yes people…websites and web profiles) can lead someone to draw conclusions about who you are.

I like to remind myself of this phrase from time to time, as a reality check of sorts. This phrase became painstakingly evident to me in my own job search. I went through a long interview process which went well at each phase. The company all but made an offer at the final interview and began to check my references shortly after. I tried to subdue my excitement (and ignore my doubt) until I had an offer in hand, and low and behold there was a reason, I did not receive an offer. What I did receive was a letter from the company explaining that they wouldn’t be making an offer based on information in my credit report. Needless to say, I was disappointed, mostly in myself for being in the position to be viewed in such a negative light.

There was a major lesson learned here! No matter how many pep talks I received from dear friends telling me I was perfect for the job and it was their loss, at the end of the day, my character and integrity were called into question. This company decided against me based on judgments they made as a result of the paper trail I left behind in my personal (financial) life. The poor decisions I’ve made previously have had far reaching implications that I had to contend with. I share this experience to educate about the importance of perception.

Remember that perception is indeed reality. While you may think one way about yourself, others might perceive you to be quite different. Most (if not all) of us deem ourselves good at what we do and highly capable. I caution you, not only as a career development professional, but as a person who has learned the hard way. These days companies are using a variety of tools to determine your merit and if you would be an asset or a liability. Be aware of how others perceive you. I challenge each of you to conduct a perception is reality check.

I have to say I agree. Thoughts?

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Pretty sure it had to do with obtaining a mortgage. And I'm not sure how context would be relevant.

Actually, I said don't live by a credit score and in regards to a mortgage was discussing manual underwriting which covers loans for those without a credit score. So again, it's not even relevant to this topic...

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Actually, I said don't live by a credit score and in regards to a mortgage was discussing manual underwriting which covers loans for those without a credit score. So again, it's not even relevant to this topic...

But this topic is about the importance of a good credit score for getting a job?

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http://www.mscareerg...ion-is-reality/

“Perception is reality.” What does this mean to you professionally?

Let’s be clear, the way people view you and the work that you do is the legacy you will leave behind. Every day as we interact with others both personally and professionally, we leave an impression. As you go about the business of conducting your life people make judgments about your character, your appearance and your abilities. Even your paper trail (i.e. resumes, credit reports and yes people…websites and web profiles) can lead someone to draw conclusions about who you are.

I like to remind myself of this phrase from time to time, as a reality check of sorts. This phrase became painstakingly evident to me in my own job search. I went through a long interview process which went well at each phase. The company all but made an offer at the final interview and began to check my references shortly after. I tried to subdue my excitement (and ignore my doubt) until I had an offer in hand, and low and behold there was a reason, I did not receive an offer. What I did receive was a letter from the company explaining that they wouldn’t be making an offer based on information in my credit report. Needless to say, I was disappointed, mostly in myself for being in the position to be viewed in such a negative light.

There was a major lesson learned here! No matter how many pep talks I received from dear friends telling me I was perfect for the job and it was their loss, at the end of the day, my character and integrity were called into question. This company decided against me based on judgments they made as a result of the paper trail I left behind in my personal (financial) life. The poor decisions I’ve made previously have had far reaching implications that I had to contend with. I share this experience to educate about the importance of perception.

Remember that perception is indeed reality. While you may think one way about yourself, others might perceive you to be quite different. Most (if not all) of us deem ourselves good at what we do and highly capable. I caution you, not only as a career development professional, but as a person who has learned the hard way. These days companies are using a variety of tools to determine your merit and if you would be an asset or a liability. Be aware of how others perceive you. I challenge each of you to conduct a perception is reality check.

I have to say I agree. Thoughts?

My Dad warned me early in life to always protect my credit and always pay my bills in a timely manner.

I had one slip up...I didn't pay for some mechanical work on a matter of principle. The mechanic did some horrible work and used some used parts and the truck went back to functioning poorly less than a week later....So I did not pay and it cost me much more in the long run.

The moral of the story is protect your credit even if you have to pay something that you don't feel you owe. It will only hurt you otherwise.

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This is the part that stuck out to me the most:

"Remember that perception is indeed reality. While you may think one way about yourself, others might perceive you to be quite different. Most (if not all) of us deem ourselves good at what we do and highly capable. I caution you, not only as a career development professional, but as a person who has learned the hard way. These days companies are using a variety of tools to determine your merit and if you would be an asset or a liability. Be aware of how others perceive you. I challenge each of you to conduct a perception is reality check."

I think the point about her credit was a good example, but not the main topic in the article.

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http://www.mscareerg...ion-is-reality/

“Perception is reality.” What does this mean to you professionally?

Let’s be clear, the way people view you and the work that you do is the legacy you will leave behind. Every day as we interact with others both personally and professionally, we leave an impression. As you go about the business of conducting your life people make judgments about your character, your appearance and your abilities. Even your paper trail (i.e. resumes, credit reports and yes people…websites and web profiles) can lead someone to draw conclusions about who you are.

I like to remind myself of this phrase from time to time, as a reality check of sorts. This phrase became painstakingly evident to me in my own job search. I went through a long interview process which went well at each phase. The company all but made an offer at the final interview and began to check my references shortly after. I tried to subdue my excitement (and ignore my doubt) until I had an offer in hand, and low and behold there was a reason, I did not receive an offer. What I did receive was a letter from the company explaining that they wouldn’t be making an offer based on information in my credit report. Needless to say, I was disappointed, mostly in myself for being in the position to be viewed in such a negative light.

There was a major lesson learned here! No matter how many pep talks I received from dear friends telling me I was perfect for the job and it was their loss, at the end of the day, my character and integrity were called into question. This company decided against me based on judgments they made as a result of the paper trail I left behind in my personal (financial) life. The poor decisions I’ve made previously have had far reaching implications that I had to contend with. I share this experience to educate about the importance of perception.

Remember that perception is indeed reality. While you may think one way about yourself, others might perceive you to be quite different. Most (if not all) of us deem ourselves good at what we do and highly capable. I caution you, not only as a career development professional, but as a person who has learned the hard way. These days companies are using a variety of tools to determine your merit and if you would be an asset or a liability. Be aware of how others perceive you. I challenge each of you to conduct a perception is reality check.

I have to say I agree. Thoughts?

Yeah I completely disagree with this article. This is real discrimination at its worst. Many good people have made many different kinds of mistakes. Why is it that discriminating against certain wrong doing is acceptable while celebrating others is the norm? No one deserves to have everything they have ever done follow them for all their lives. This helps to create a criminal class and generational cycles of poverty. This article while sounding reasonable on the surface is utter bunk when more closely evaluated. Why dont you turn that cannon at yourself. What if you were were the one being discriminated against because you were divorced, or had a kid without being married, or said something questionable on the internet.

Reality is reality perception certainly is not that is post modernism and is complete junk. If you want to talk about individual responsibility and honoring your obligations that is another discussion but perception is not reality.

Edited by Sobeit
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Yeah I completely disagree with this article. This is real discrimination at its worst. Many good people have made many different kinds of mistakes. Why is it that discriminating against certain wrong doing is acceptable while celebrating others is the norm? No one deserves to have everything they have ever done follow them for all their lives. This helps to create a criminal class and generational cycles of poverty. This article while sounding reasonable on the surface is utter bunk when more closely evaluated. Why dont you turn that cannon at yourself. What if you were were the one being discriminated against because you were divorced, or had a kid without being married, or said something questionable on the internet.

Reality is reality perception certainly is not that is post modernism and is complete junk.

To each his own - you are entitled to your opinion, but not everyone judges people the same way. For some it is unfortunate, but it is what it is, hence Perception Is Reality.

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To each his own - you are entitled to your opinion, but not everyone judges people the same way. For some it is unfortunate, but it is what it is, hence Perception Is Reality.

No you are wrong just because you perceive something a certain way does not make it reality. It may in fact create a false reality that turns logic common sense and truth upside down. Truth remains when all else comes crashing down. So no perception is not reality.

Edited by Sobeit
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No you are wrong just because you perceive something a certain way does not make it reality. It may in fact create a false reality that turns logic common sense and truth upside down. Truth remains when all else comes crashing down. So no perception is not reality.

That is not the point. The reason for the Perception is Reality argument is that the perceptions are reality to the perceiver. Yes, stereotypes, discrimination, etc can easily be a part of it, but again - it is what it is.

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