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Injuries............wall To Wall In The N F L


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For the past 6-7 years INJURIES have increased like wildfire in the NFL.

I remember, going waaaay back to the 1960's or 70's where you almost never heard of injuries taking players out of multiple games.

Today.............it's almost expected, every week more and more. They are everywhere and it will get 10 times worse when the real bullets start flying............again.

I pity the teams' management. Seriously.

They have no idea today who will be left standing from week to week. Rosters are turning into "Musical Chairs".

The game has changed...........and NOT for the better.

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When you do whatever you can to prevent injury, and tell players to play more cautious to watch out for injuries, your bound to get someone injured, look at the knee injuries that have occured, they asked players to stop aiming high so now they aim low, and Players knee get blown out like Ovie,Cushing,Gronk.

When you change up so much of where you can hit someone while telling the defender to take a player down any way necessary,injuries will occur more often.

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Players have so much muscle these days it's hard for their bodies to handle it. Steven Jackson is a prime example.

not necessarily,turner was built, mainly his legs and he rarely got injured. Jackson body has a lot of wear and tear on it, after all these years muscle or not, I would be shocked if his body wasn't breaking down, the fact that he is built so well, and has all that muscle is prob why he hasn't suffered anything so serious in his career.
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People are bigger, faster, stronger, but knees are not. They fly at each other like human missiles and contact is explosive and more violent than ever before. Add to that more awareness of injury impact and coaches and GMs are choosing to protect their investments and players are being held out in the hope that they can return at 100% later.

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I'm pretty sure that the injury rate has stayed relatively similar today.

The difference is how we perceive these injuries. 30 years ago, few football fans were aware of the 4th WR on every team in the league. Every single player on a given 53 wasn't given their own page on Rotoworld.

Football wasnt followed as closely. Injuries were experienced by you favorite team, your local team (if they werent your favorite) and super stars. Now? Everybody is relevant.

"Oh man, the Jets lost Jermaine Cunningham....he was going to be their 3rd or 4th pass rusher...thats a big loss!"

Thats the difference.

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I love football but even with the softening of the league their is just to much injury issues, to many games hinge on injuries.

I'm not sure what if anything can be done but in the long term I'm starting to wonder about the long term standing for the league.

As a dad I don't want my son playing football, as a fan I don't want a powder puff league.

And it seems every year teams go up and down based on injuries. It is frustrating as a fan to have to deal with years like last year where our teams suffered so many important injuries.

Like I said I don't know the answers but it is really frustrating all around how vulernable the league is to injuries that dramatically effect how a team does and also how these injuries effect the lifespan of it's players.

Edited by MAD597
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I'm pretty sure that the injury rate has stayed relatively similar today.

The difference is how we perceive these injuries. 30 years ago, few football fans were aware of the 4th WR on every team in the league. Every single player on a given 53 wasn't given their own page on Rotoworld.

Football wasnt followed as closely. Injuries were experienced by you favorite team, your local team (if they werent your favorite) and super stars. Now? Everybody is relevant.

"Oh man, the Jets lost Jermaine Cunningham....he was going to be their 3rd or 4th pass rusher...thats a big loss!"

Thats the difference.

You hit the nail on the head. More media coverage and interest has resulted in every little detail about a team being reported and shared through social media.

Back in the day a concussion was called "having your bell rung" and the prescription was smelling salt and a dose of man up.

Before MRI machines could detect ligament tears accurately if you could walk and run you could play.

Everything is reported and hyped up nowadays. It's not a bad thing just how things have changed.

Edited by insight
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I love football but even with the softening of the league their is just to much injury issues, to many games hinge on injuries.

I'm not sure what if anything can be done but in the long term I'm starting to wonder about the long term standing for the league.

As a dad I don't want my son playing football, as a fan I don't want a powder puff league.

And it seems every year teams go up and down based on injuries. It is frustrating as a fan to have to deal with years like last year where our teams suffered so many important injuries.

Like I said I don't know the answers but it is really frustrating all around how vulernable the league is to injuries that dramatically effect how a team does and also how these injuries effect the lifespan of it's players.

Ditto this ^^^^^ !!!

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You hit the nail on the head. More media coverage and interest has resulted in every little detail about a team being reported and shared through social media.

Back in the day a concussion was called "having your bell rung" and the prescription was smelling salt and a dose of man up.

Before MRI machines could detect ligament tears accurately if you could walk and run you could play.

Everything is reported and hyped up nowadays. It's not a bad thing just how things have changed.

This............so true !!

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I'm pretty sure that the injury rate has stayed relatively similar today.

The difference is how we perceive these injuries. 30 years ago, few football fans were aware of the 4th WR on every team in the league. Every single player on a given 53 wasn't given their own page on Rotoworld.

Football wasnt followed as closely. Injuries were experienced by you favorite team, your local team (if they werent your favorite) and super stars. Now? Everybody is relevant.

"Oh man, the Jets lost Jermaine Cunningham....he was going to be their 3rd or 4th pass rusher...thats a big loss!"

Thats the difference.

This and the fact that fans are more emotionally invested through fantasy sports, social media is on the clock 24/7, the players are larger investments for teams and cities and we know more now about sports related injuries than we did even 10-15 years ago. (IE concussions) I know personally I've probably had 3-4 more mild concussions that went misdiagnosed because I felt like I just "got my bell rung" in college, the one I KNOW I had didn't even hurt and that was from a massive car accident. (I was rear ended while I was stopped the guy was doing 60 that hit me) We didn't know what concussions felt like or even looked like 10 years ago, now we do and it's a good thing. This has nothing to do with players getting soft or the game getting soft. Anyone that has that mindset likely wouldn't last a down of NFL or college football.

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So many wish to blame the NFL officials for things like this, but, in reality, it's the players, or the NFLPA to be more specific. One of the changes agreed upon in the new CBA, was that practices would be extremely limited. So basically, coaches don't have as much time, trying to get these guys conditioned, as they did before. The result is more injuries.

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So many wish to blame the NFL officials for things like this, but, in reality, it's the players, or the NFLPA to be more specific. One of the changes agreed upon in the new CBA, was that practices would be extremely limited. So basically, coaches don't have as much time, trying to get these guys conditioned, as they did before. The result is more injuries.

Beat me to it by a few seconds. Exactly the problem and nothing more or less...

Want less injuries, require more conditioning again.

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So many wish to blame the NFL officials for things like this, but, in reality, it's the players, or the NFLPA to be more specific. One of the changes agreed upon in the new CBA, was that practices would be extremely limited. So basically, coaches don't have as much time, trying to get these guys conditioned, as they did before. The result is more injuries.

If they're professionals they'll work out on their own. That was the idea behind the agreement. Guys like Roddy, Fitzgerald, Julio, etc. know how to work the program the right way. Injuries are going to happen it's a violent game, I think the lack of conditioning is an excuse players can make but it's not a fair one.

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If they're professionals they'll work out on their own. That was the idea behind the agreement. Guys like Roddy, Fitzgerald, Julio, etc. know how to work the program the right way. Injuries are going to happen it's a violent game, I think the lack of conditioning is an excuse players can make but it's not a fair one.

Except 2/3 of those guys were injured last year. It might be that they weren't conditioned correctly. Cardio work on machines is still nothing like practicing with contact. Can the contact in practice lead to injuries? Sure. But guys on the same team are rarely looking to hit as hard as they would someone on another team, but the contact they do get at least conditions their bodies for full speed contact from the opposing team.

Edited by Power I
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If they're professionals they'll work out on their own. That was the idea behind the agreement. Guys like Roddy, Fitzgerald, Julio, etc. know how to work the program the right way. Injuries are going to happen it's a violent game, I think the lack of conditioning is an excuse players can make but it's not a fair one.

You can call them not "professionals" if you want, but the reality is, they're not trainers, they're players. There's a reason why the teams employ coaches and trainers to get this done. Oh, and with a few exceptions, the type of guys that you are referring to are season veterans. Most rookies don't just come into the league, ready to complete an NFL training regimen.

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You can call them not "professionals" if you want, but the reality is, they're not trainers, they're players. There's a reason why the teams employ coaches and trainers to get this done. Oh, and with a few exceptions, the type of guys that you are referring to are season veterans. Most rookies don't just come into the league, ready to complete an NFL training regimen.

Not just that, but whether we want to believe it or not, the NFL is more of a job than it is a passion for a lot of these guys. I don't do a lot on my free time to stay sharp for work; as soon as I leave the place, I think about anything but coming back for more. As easy as it is to think that you'll work out on your own, you probably will run more stairs and work harder with a second party there to push you. Some vets bust their ***** to stay in shape because they want to blow up the next year, others work as hard as they think they need to in order to make the roster.
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