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Rip Maya Angelou


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"The first time someone shows you who they are, believe them."

“I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

I live by the 1st quote and I find the 2nd to be incredibly accurate.

RIP.

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I was fortunate to meet Maya Angelou many years ago when I was on the BOD of a non-profit agency, and we had engaged Maya to come to Louisville to speak (it was a fundraiser for the agency, and we sold tickets for her speech, which took place at the KY Center for the Arts.) After her speech there was a small private reception, and as it wound down Maya and I were among the last people left and we started to chat. I remember her asking lots of questions about my background, my family and the work being done by the non-profit agency. We spoke for awhile and I'll always remember her smile, her laughter and how genuinely interested she seemed to be in our conversation.

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Poems are supposed to rhyme, everything else is just words strewn together. Not that they can't be meaningful or insightful and it doesn't mean the author isn't talented. It just means they've chosen not to do the hardest thing a writer can do....make a statement with rhyming words and not come off as Dr Suessish

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Poems are supposed to rhyme, everything else is just words strewn together. Not that they can't be meaningful or insightful and it doesn't mean the author isn't talented. It just means they've chosen not to do the hardest thing a writer can do....make a statement with rhyming words and not come off as Dr Suessish

Non-rhyming poetry is just a paragraph with line breaks and commas in weird places.

Also, you can rhyme and still sound like a complete idiot: rap.

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Non-rhyming poetry is just a paragraph with line breaks and commas in weird places.

Also, you can rhyme and still sound like a complete idiot: rap.

Thanks, was worried we might get through an entire thread on poetry without somebody bitching about rap music.

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Poems are supposed to rhyme, everything else is just words strewn together. Not that they can't be meaningful or insightful and it doesn't mean the author isn't talented. It just means they've chosen not to do the hardest thing a writer can do....make a statement with rhyming words and not come off as Dr Suessish

Poems don't have to rhyme. That's your opinion.

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Still I Rise

You may write me down in history

With your bitter, twisted lies,

You may trod me in the very dirt

But still, like dust, I’ll rise.

Does my sassiness upset you?

Why are you beset with gloom?

‘Cause I walk like I’ve got oil wells

Pumping in my living room.

Just like moons and like suns,

With the certainty of tides,

Just like hopes springing high,

Still I’ll rise.

Did you want to see me broken?

Bowed head and lowered eyes?

Shoulders falling down like teardrops,

Weakened by my soulful cries?

Does my haughtiness offend you?

Don’t you take it awful hard

‘Cause I laugh like I’ve got gold mines

Diggin’ in my own backyard.

You may shoot me with your words,

You may cut me with your eyes,

You may kill me with your hatefulness,

But still, like air, I’ll rise.

Does my sexiness upset you?

Does it come as a surprise

That I dance like I’ve got diamonds

At the meeting of my thighs?

Out of the huts of history’s shame

I rise

Up from a past that’s rooted in pain

I rise

I’m a black ocean, leaping and wide,

Welling and swelling I bear in the tide.

Leaving behind nights of terror and fear

I rise

Into a daybreak that’s wondrously clear

I rise

Bringing the gifts that my ancestors gave,

I am the dream and the hope of the slave.

I rise

I rise

I rise.

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Poems don't have to rhyme. That's your opinion.

I could answer; may be or not so much...either way, I'm satisfied with the company I keep ;)

Why Don't Poems Rhyme Anymore?

The Queen's English Society may sound like the name of a Monty Python sketch, but I assure you it's very real. The group aims to protect "the beauty and precision of the English Language," and it's currently up in arms about supposed poems that--egad!--have no rhyme or meter.

The President of the QES, a man named Michael George Gibson (it may be a QES requirement to use three names), recently told the British newspaper The Guardian, "For centuries word-things, called poems, have been made according to primary and defining craft principles of, first, measure, and second, alliteration and rhyme. Word-things not made according to those principles are not poems."

I'm sorry...word-things?

Anyway, the QES isn't alone. Here in America, a movement called New Formalism has been pushing for a return to formal verse for decades. The poet and critic Dana Gioia in his "Notes on New Formalism" ticked off what he perceived to be the problems with contemporary free verse poetry:

The debasement of poetic language; the prolixity of the lyric; the bankruptcy of the confessional mode; the inability to establish a meaningful aesthetic for new poetic narrative and the denial of a musical texture in the contemporary poem. The revival of traditional forms will be seen then as only one response to this troubling situation.

I can hear the QES members tapping their canes in agreement.

Formalists have been tapping their canes for about a century now. Literary history records a sprinkling of early free verse poets like Walt Whitman and Christoper Smart, but the movement began in earnest in the early 1900s. Ezra Pound, who many consider to be the movement's figurehead, was a devoted student of poetry's traditions and a strong believer in the power of form, but he found the strict adherence to rhyme and meter limiting and artificial. He wrote many formal poems himself and thought poets should study the art's traditions before moving beyond them. He also felt they shouldn't move too far, writing "poetry begins to atrophy when it gets too far from the music."

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