Jump to content

Zero Tea Party Candidates Are Ahead In Next Tuesday’S Big Primaries. Zero.


cnasty
 Share

Recommended Posts

http://www.washingto...ro/?tid=rssfeed

Despite the handful of "Great Job!" stickers delivered via tea party-mentioning headlines, Sasse's victory, when paired with the previous "establishment" victories, functions far better as a trend than an outlier. As Molly Ball points out, "tea party-endorsed" Sasse won because he carefully balanced the establishment and the crowd further to the right. As did "establishment-endorsed" -- but still pretty darn conservative -- Thom Tillis, who will face off against Democratic Sen. Kay Hagan in North Carolina this November.

DAILY DIGIT

0

tea party candidates are ahead in next Tuesday's big primaries

Read related article. updated 1 day ago

Election Lab: 2014 elections forecast


The way to win in the Republican Party these days, the primary trend seems to imply, is to have everyone utterly confused about where your allegiance lies -- but to also keep the establishment happy, even if invisibly.

The Republican candidates leading the polls in the biggest primaries next Tuesday follow the same script. Zero of them are challengers from the right, although plenty are conservative enough to keep you wondering.

In Georgia, there are multiple tea party candidates to choose from in the Republican Senate primary. A millionaire businessman and 22-year veteran of Congressare in the lead, and will likely shut the tea party out of the presumed runoff. In the Republican primary for Idaho's 2nd District seat, incumbent Rep. Mike Simpson seems safe from tea party challenger Bryan Smith, although polling is scarce. Club for Growth, a conservative group known for spending big on tea party challengers, has been silentin the race the past few weeks.

Matt Bevin tried to wrest away the Kentucky senate nomination from Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, which didn't end well. The last NBC News/Marist poll has McConnell up by 32 percentage points. In the Oregon Senate primary, physician Monica Wehby has established herself as the centrist in the race, and is ahead of her opponent, state Rep. Jason Conger, by 21 percentage points in the last poll. Oregon Right to Life and American Principles Fund have spent money against Wehby.

In Arkansas, Rep. Tom Cotton is the lone Republican running, and he's in the mold of Tillis and Sasse. He has the support of the Republican National Senatorial Committee and Club for Growth. One Republican strategist told Business Insider, "He balances both wings of the party by not insulting either and by embodying both." Steven Law, president of American Crossroads, told The Washington Post in 2013, "Representative Cotton is a conservative leader and rock star candidate."

All that gushing -- and the money that comes with it -- shows why Republican candidates have been loathe to wed themselves to either branch of the GOP. Their track record in 2014 primaries show that it's a smart strategy too, at least for now. Whether staying comfortable with the tea party while networking with the establishment on the side is as successful a strategy for winning general elections remains to be seen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dems will have a National disaster in every way this year and in 16. Repubs will retake the Senate and stop this idiot President and his insane policies in his tracks. When we get a Republican President in 2016, we will get this country back on it's feet again.

Awww that's cute. You actually believe things won't be exactly the same regardless of what party is in office.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How many Occupy Wallstreet Candidates?

They didn't latch themselves to an established political party like a parasite like the Tea Party did. It was a poor move on their part but a good thing for the political health of the country. The last thing we need is both parties getting pulled as far left or far right as possible as candidates try to gain appeal to the lowest common denominators of both sides of the political spectrum.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They didn't latch themselves to an established political party like a parasite like the Tea Party did. It was a poor move on their part but a good thing for the political health of the country. The last thing we need is both parties getting pulled as far left or far right as possible as candidates try to gain appeal to the lowest common denominators of both sides of the political spectrum.

as if that isn't already happening. class warfare, racism, and fear are already used by both sides because people, in general, are too stupid to think for themselves

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...