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Over 6 Million Now Enrolled In Private Insurance Through Obamacare.


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Just asking for a credible source for the claim that the administration has, "already been caught multiple times doctoring numbers (fake districts, counting shopping carts)". You are never able to substantiate your false claims, but I'm hoping Doozer comes through with a credible source this time.

quick google search:

Stimulus money spent in fake districts.

http://www.texastrib...fake-districts/

Obama administration expands definition of enrollment to include shoppers to increase numbers.

http://www.wnd.com/2...t-bought-plans/

edit: After all this time, and multiple requests, I have yet to see where the enrollment numbers are coming from, you've just extrapolated them from random bits and pieces. Link the breakdown of how many medicare/medicaid, subsidy enrollees are included in the 6 million. The standard answer from the White House is "we don't know"

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quick google search:

Stimulus money spent in fake districts.

http://www.texastrib...fake-districts/

Obama administration expands definition of enrollment to include shoppers to increase numbers.

http://www.wnd.com/2...t-bought-plans/

edit: After all this time, and multiple requests, I have yet to see where the enrollment numbers are coming from, you've just extrapolated them from random bits and pieces. Link the breakdown of how many medicare/medicaid, subsidy enrollees are included in the 6 million. The standard answer from the White House is "we don't know"

From the first article:

Recovery Board Communications Director Joe Pound chalks it up to human error. “We report what the recipients submit to us," told ABC News. “Some recipients clearly don't know what congressional district they live in, so they appear to be just throwing in any number. We expected all along that recipients would make mistakes on their congressional districts, on jobs numbers, on award amounts, and so on. Human beings make mistakes."

From the second, that's actually the first credible evidence that I've seen supporting that claim about counting "shopping carts" as enrollees. I'm not dismissing it - it's from an anonymous yet credible source - but I searched around a little for recent information that was literally the only thing that I found. All of the other sources linked back to that one. Again, it's not something to dismiss but neither is it something that we can declare as absolute fact given that we only have a single newspaper citing a single anonymous source.

Of course, if it were false I would think that administration officials would have knocked it down long ago. I haven't seen any denial from the administration during my limited search.

So that's where we stand - we have some reason to suspect that the numbers are not actual people who signed up for an insurance policy and we don't know (if true) what percent of the total "enrollees" they comprise. This is why the administration needs to hurry up and release a full breakdown of the data after tomorrow's deadline. Thanks for the info, btw!

As to your question about breakdown of Medicaid, private insurance, and so forth, the administration hasn't released that information either. Or rather, there are serious problems with the Medicaid numbers because we don't know how many people used the website to renew their Medicaid (which means they're not new enrollees). The only hard numbers we have are from the administration. However, there is a very good website with a great track record of forecasting these things:

http://acasignups.net/

They correctly predicted the date on which the number of enrollees hit six million, for example. They estimate that 6.75 million people will have "enrolled" in private insurance (quotations to indicate uncertainty with the data), another 4.7-7.5 million enrolled in Medicaid/CHIP, and another several million are under 26 who remained on their parents' policies.

I'm not sure if the Medicaid estimate accounts for the uncertainty about new enrollments versus renewals.

It looks like this is something that we'll have to wait a few weeks when the final numbers are released by the administration to see a full breakdown. But at least we're dealing with facts and credible sources (however uncertain the info is) instead of blind speculation and partisan rhetoric.

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Real numbers! At this rate it would take almost another 3 years get the privately insured and medicaid recipients insured assuming things as they are hold up at it's current rate. This is also considering the affordability and quality of care proves to be sufficient enough for enrollment to continue on this pace. One thing is for sure, in that much time we will know if this thing can really be sustainable to our economy.

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Take into account the 3 and 1/2 since the ACA was signed into law, then the projected time it will take at this pace to get everyone insured, we are talking nearly 7 years trying to get people healthcare. Now factor in what went on with a lot of people's health in a 7 year period, what if anything, has really been accomplished? What will be the consequences of trying to get people something they may not want, may not need? Jobs, cut hours, paycuts, lose your doctor, worse healthcare? We just do not know at this point!

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Take into account the 3 and 1/2 since the ACA was signed into law, then the projected time it will take at this pace to get everyone insured, we are talking nearly 7 years trying to get people healthcare. Now factor in what went on with a lot of people's health in a 7 year period, what if anything, has really been accomplished? What will be the consequences of trying to get people something they may not want, may not need? Jobs, cut hours, paycuts, lose your doctor, worse healthcare? We just do not know at this point!

It doesn't really matter how long it takes for this law to take effect, it's whether or not the end result will be better or worse. At this point, all we've seen is a constant spin about how it's not as bad as before. When is this supposed to improve affordability?

edit: We've spent 1.5 billion dollars so far and the best they can muster is "I don't know, give it time."

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This may be one of the best summaries of the health care numbers that I've seen. There's still the question about how many of the 6 million who received insurance through the exchange are "shopping carts" versus enrollments, but he points out other areas where people are covered beyond the exchanges. He also links to several surveys and data sources beyond the administration numbers. Check out the bold text, which is going to be pretty big news when Gallup releases the numbers.

http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-obamacare-uninsured-national-20140331,0,5472960.story#ixzz2xXknAT5X

WASHINGTON — President Obama's healthcare law, despite a rocky rollout and determined opposition from critics, already has spurred the largest expansion in health coverage in America in half a century, national surveys and enrollment data show.

As the law's initial enrollment period closes, at least 9.5 million previously uninsured people have gained coverage. Some have done so through marketplaces created by the law, some through other private insurance and others through Medicaid, which has expanded under the law in about half the states.

The tally draws from a review of state and federal enrollment reports, surveys and interviews with insurance executives and government officials nationwide.

The Affordable Care Act still faces major challenges, particularly the risk of premium hikes next year that could drive away newly insured customers. But the increased coverage so far amounts to substantial progress toward one of the law's principal goals and is the most significant expansion since the creation of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965.

The millions of newly insured also create a politically important constituency that may complicate any future Republican repeal efforts.

Precise figures on national health coverage will not be available for months. But available data indicate:

• At least 6 million people have signed up for health coverage on the new marketplaces, about one-third of whom were previously uninsured.

• A February survey by consulting firm McKinsey & Co. found 27% of new enrollees were previously uninsured, but newer survey data from the nonprofit Rand Corp. and reports from marketplace officials in several states suggest that share increased in March.

• At least 4.5 million previously uninsured adults have signed up for state Medicaid programs, according to Rand's unpublished survey data, which were shared with The Times. That tracks with estimates from Avalere Health, a consulting firm that is closely following the law's implementation.

• An additional 3 million young adults have gained coverage in recent years through a provision of the law that enables dependent children to remain on their parents' health plans until they turn 26, according to national health insurance surveys from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

• About 9 million people have bought health plans directly from insurers, instead of using the marketplaces, Rand found. The vast majority of these people were previously insured.

• Fewer than a million people who had health plans in 2013 are now uninsured because their plans were canceled for not meeting new standards set by the law, the Rand survey indicates.

Republican critics of the law have suggested that the cancellations last fall have led to a net reduction in coverage.

That is not supported by survey data or insurance companies, many of which report they have retained the vast majority of their 2013 customers by renewing old policies, which is permitted in about half the states, or by moving customers to new plans.

"We are talking about a very small fraction of the country" who lost coverage, said Katherine Carman, a Rand economist who is overseeing the survey.

Rand has been polling 3,300 Americans monthly about their insurance choices since last fall. Researchers found that the share of adults ages 18 to 64 without health insurance has declined from 20.9% last fall to 16.6% as of March 22.

The decrease parallels a similar drop recorded by Gallup, which found in its national polling that the uninsured rate among adults had declined from 18% in the final quarter of last year to 15.9% through the first two months of 2014. Gallup's overall uninsured rate is lower than Rand's because it includes seniors on Medicare.

Gallup Editor in Chief Frank Newport said that March polling, which has not been released yet, indicates the uninsured rate has declined further.

"While it is important to be cautious, the logical conclusion is that the law is having an effect," he said.

Although estimates vary, about 45 million to 48 million people are believed to have been uninsured before the marketplaces opened last year.

http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-obamacare-uninsured-national-20140331,0,5472960.story#ixzz2xYO9KLa2

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It doesn't really matter how long it takes for this law to take effect, it's whether or not the end result will be better or worse. At this point, all we've seen is a constant spin about how it's not as bad as before. When is this supposed to improve affordability?

edit: We've spent 1.5 billion dollars so far and the best they can muster is "I don't know, give it time."

The original estimate cost by the CBO was $900 Billion and that was to try and get everyone aboard so they would go for it. Some estimates have said we've triple that figure at $2.7 Trillion dollars. Are you just talking about recent advertisement costs?

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As it turns out, only about a million of these supposed six million actually have insurance coverage.

Of course that means this "open enrollment" period is going to be extended again. And, anyone with any common sense knows that this open enrollment period is going to last through this administration's term. There will be nothing done while there is a mid term election on the horizon and then another Presidential election looming after that.

What a fiasco Obama and the Democrats have created.

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Coincidentally, I was just coming here to post another article from LA Times. The pertinent paragraph is:

"The few states that do break out their own numbers, moreover, contradict McKinsey. Kentucky says that some 75% of its exchange enrollees were previously uninsured. New York says that about 60% of its exchange enrollees were previously uninsured. That number has been rising over time, raising the prospect that the March surge will include an even higher ratio of uninsured customers; Gaba, who has calculated a time series of New York enrollments based on the state's monthly news releases, calculates that of enrollees in mid-February, at least 92% had been uninsured.

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http://www.latimes.c...y#ixzz2xYSEja9A

LAtimes said about only a quarter of these new sign ups were previously uninsured in February but the number will slightly increase in march? Are you fuggin' kidding me?blink.png

I posted that article in its entirety yesterday. You should read before posting.

This may be one of the best summaries of the health care numbers that I've seen. There's still the question about how many of the 6 million who received insurance through the exchange are "shopping carts" versus enrollments, but he points out other areas where people are covered beyond the exchanges. He also links to several surveys and data sources beyond the administration numbers. Check out the bold text, which is going to be pretty big news when Gallup releases the numbers.

http://www.latimes.c...y#ixzz2xXknAT5X

WASHINGTON — President Obama's healthcare law, despite a rocky rollout and determined opposition from critics, already has spurred the largest expansion in health coverage in America in half a century, national surveys and enrollment data show.

As the law's initial enrollment period closes, at least 9.5 million previously uninsured people have gained coverage. Some have done so through marketplaces created by the law, some through other private insurance and others through Medicaid, which has expanded under the law in about half the states.

The tally draws from a review of state and federal enrollment reports, surveys and interviews with insurance executives and government officials nationwide.

The Affordable Care Act still faces major challenges, particularly the risk of premium hikes next year that could drive away newly insured customers. But the increased coverage so far amounts to substantial progress toward one of the law's principal goals and is the most significant expansion since the creation of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965.

The millions of newly insured also create a politically important constituency that may complicate any future Republican repeal efforts.

Precise figures on national health coverage will not be available for months. But available data indicate:

• At least 6 million people have signed up for health coverage on the new marketplaces, about one-third of whom were previously uninsured.

• A February survey by consulting firm McKinsey & Co. found 27% of new enrollees were previously uninsured, but newer survey data from the nonprofit Rand Corp. and reports from marketplace officials in several states suggest that share increased in March.

• At least 4.5 million previously uninsured adults have signed up for state Medicaid programs, according to Rand's unpublished survey data, which were shared with The Times. That tracks with estimates from Avalere Health, a consulting firm that is closely following the law's implementation.

• An additional 3 million young adults have gained coverage in recent years through a provision of the law that enables dependent children to remain on their parents' health plans until they turn 26, according to national health insurance surveys from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

• About 9 million people have bought health plans directly from insurers, instead of using the marketplaces, Rand found. The vast majority of these people were previously insured.

• Fewer than a million people who had health plans in 2013 are now uninsured because their plans were canceled for not meeting new standards set by the law, the Rand survey indicates.

Republican critics of the law have suggested that the cancellations last fall have led to a net reduction in coverage.

That is not supported by survey data or insurance companies, many of which report they have retained the vast majority of their 2013 customers by renewing old policies, which is permitted in about half the states, or by moving customers to new plans.

"We are talking about a very small fraction of the country" who lost coverage, said Katherine Carman, a Rand economist who is overseeing the survey.

Rand has been polling 3,300 Americans monthly about their insurance choices since last fall. Researchers found that the share of adults ages 18 to 64 without health insurance has declined from 20.9% last fall to 16.6% as of March 22.

The decrease parallels a similar drop recorded by Gallup, which found in its national polling that the uninsured rate among adults had declined from 18% in the final quarter of last year to 15.9% through the first two months of 2014. Gallup's overall uninsured rate is lower than Rand's because it includes seniors on Medicare.

Gallup Editor in Chief Frank Newport said that March polling, which has not been released yet, indicates the uninsured rate has declined further.

"While it is important to be cautious, the logical conclusion is that the law is having an effect," he said.

Although estimates vary, about 45 million to 48 million people are believed to have been uninsured before the marketplaces opened last year.

http://www.latimes.c...y#ixzz2xYO9KLa2

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There is a mic drop due in Obama's 4:15 presser.

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Some unconfirmed reports say the final number came in above 7 million. Need to wait for official confirmation, but if that's true then that's pretty unexpected.

It will be fun to watch the right's argument go from "nobody is signing up!" to "oh it's just 7 million and 80% are Medicaid and they're cooking the books and BENGHAZI!!!"

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A start, but I want them to make it better over time! I dont believe people should go bankrupt getting medical care!

Couldn't agree more. What we need are Republicans who can propose specific fixes to the current law that makes it better. Simply screaming "REPEAL!" doesn't do anything for anyone other than the politicians wanting to get reelected in red districts.

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Couldn't agree more. What we need are Republicans who can propose specific fixes to the current law that makes it better. Simply screaming "REPEAL!" doesn't do anything for anyone other than the politicians wanting to get reelected in red districts.

That's a prescription for politics in America these days.
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Really, its all good ? So now supposedly you have 7 mil "signed up" and the party is on a the White House......That is if you can believe a word that this Administration says. There are millions that don't.

What you have is " 7 mil " that have SELECTED a plan , you have an administration that will not tell the public how many have paid, how many are just replacing their old plan that was cancelled, how many are new, or what the age groups that have purchased the so called plans. WHY you ask??? because Sebelius says they don't have those numbers ? What? The insurance companies have it, why wouldn't they have them ? WE ALL KNOW THEY HAVE THOSE NUMBERS. Its OBV they are not good for the Admin.

Are you left wing zombies that dumb and blind that you cant even ask that question ? Doesn't this "lets play hide the no's" even smell a little bit to you whack jobs?

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That's a prescription for politics in America these days.

No doubt. In a weird way, I actually that Republicans do take control of the Senate if for no reason than that they eliminate the filibuster entirely and we can get rid of the crazy incentive for the minority party to block everything that comes through. My hope is that we can get to a point where we can govern more than we do now and posture less.

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