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AREA 51

The Dark Side Of Climbing Mount Everest

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Guest Deisel

Area, those are all true points and to add, Scott and Rob were both caught out, to high, ignoring the reality's of their situations because of Guide/Client relationships and committments. Rob stayed because this was his OLD friend, whom he'd guided and become close to. I believe Rob thought they could Bivy and get down the next morning. Its been done before on numerous mnts, even as high as they were. Stephen Venebles was a notorious case. On Scott's decision, he actually was suffering from AMS or high altitude mnt sickness. He had a cold and was suffering the day before. Also, not to be overlooked, Guides are putting in ropes, cooking, doing alot more work, longer and exposed more often then the clients, so they weaken as anyone would.

The client guide relationship has changed the game forever. In the old days, it was like minded, competent climbers doing what they loved and each player knew their limits, the terrain as well as they could, and knew how to survive. Now, its a few pro's followed by 3 clients, supported by 5 sherpa's. The clients sign waivers but everyone knows if a guide loses a client, they will most likely be sued and there guiding business will suffer from bad press. It makes the guides go out on limbs, but thats not to mean, the guides don't screw up as well. Both Rob and Scott were driven PAST their own intuition to get the paying customers to the top. Some guides with softer personalities are unable to turn around hard headed clients or someone who is close whom failed a year or so ago.

The walking over the bodies is a big debate as well. How can able bodied people ignore a stricken climber and go to the top? Whats the Top worth, more then saving, or at least trying to save a life? Ego and pride fall into that. Selfishness falls into that, and then the time and money you spend trying to get to this goal. Its complicated for many and with the mental confusion up high, that too adds to the drama....

Like seamen, mountaineers have the same like code. You help a stricken climber. But at 28000 feet, helping can end Your life very easily, so many put their heads down and climb on by.

Here's a fact that I've read abt many times. Survivors guilt is apparent with many of those who walk by and don't help. Its apparent with those that Do help. But, many who did nothing have very big misgivings when they get down. If they were climbing to brag abt the achievement, the families of those who perished and the press can and do remidy that.

Who the heck wants to gloat abt reaching the top of a stationary rock, that isn't going anywhere, when you failed to aid another human being whom MAYBE with alittle help, turning around yourself and assisting, could have come down alive? There are numerous examples of summiters being assaulted upon making it back alive when others didn't.

The most prominent example was Reinhold Messner, the greatest climber of all time, imo, whose brother died on Annapurna I believe. Messner lost many partners including the famous Peter Habler and he is demonized by many for making down, alive....

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Guest Deisel

Is that a glacier? I know those are dangerous. One miss step and one slides right off the mountain. Two stories I read.

One, a Taiwanese climber got out of his tent on Everest without his climbing boots and slid off.

Second one, was at Mt. Rainer you speak of, when two young, inexperienced Rangers apparently slid on a glacier and fell 1200 feet off the mountain while attempting a rescue.

That is a very steep glacier on Orizaba. Ropes, crampons and ice gear are your only thing stoping you from making a hasty decent. On this trip, we woke up, at high camp I believe, maybe lower, to the sounds of a helicopter dangling something below it. It was the body of a climber who fell, roughly where our picture was takin, here, just a few days before. There were 2 of them and 1 pulled the other off and they both died....

People slip and fall frequently on mnts...A famous female guide(Marty Hoey) who was assisting Frank Wells and **** Bass on their 1st ever SEVEN SUMMITs bid, slipped out of her harness on Everest, to her Death. She was a very experienced climber.

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I can get obsessed about learning all I can on nearly anything, so despite not ever climbing anything higher than Stone Mountain, I have managed to learn a bit about mountian climbing. On paper anyways, so I know that K2, though lower than Everest, is actually harder to climb and one needs actual technical climbing skill to reach the peak.

Being more difficult to climb, K2 keeps things real, so only 302 have reached the summit with 80 deaths. That comes out to one death for ever four who summit. Everest, I believe, has improved to one death for every ten who summit.

Annapurna in Central Nepal is the most dangerous. 41% death rate.

If you try and climb that mountain, you are basically flipping a coin with your life.

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Guest Deisel

Annapurna in Central Nepal is the most dangerous. 41% death rate.

If you try and climb that mountain, you are basically flipping a coin with your life.

Peyton, the big problems with Annapurna is its Way out of the way and remote. Its the wilderness of Mnts. It also is irregularly shapped and gets alot of high cornices that we all know are fragile. Most climbers dont go there because its just too hard to get too. It has a high mortality rate as many of the little known peaks do....You get in trouble on Annapurna, noone will hear from you again.

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I pretty much agree with everything area51 just posted (you sure you're not a climber? J/k)

One thing though would be rescue- as rescue capabilities have increased many climbers, typically

Novices, develop a false sense if security in falsely assuming that rescue IS just a cell phone call

or Spot Beacon signal away. Sometimes it is, sometimes it's not, personally I wouldn't bet my life

on it and go into any climb as prepared and self-reliant as possible.

To everyone posting- people climb for different reasons, just like any difficult endeavor. Some for

Glory, some for self-discovery, some for the physical challenge. As a guide I actually have clients

that go climb something so they can feel empowered by facing their feat of heights.

It's nobodies place to judge why somebody does something but from my and many others perspective if you are one of the people attracted to climb Everest or any mountain for that matter

simply because you want to brag about how you climbed something others have died on, at the very

least your motives are in poor taste, and more than likely you're motives may get you in trouble as is witnessed every year on mountains all over the world when people spend $ and don't want to return "empty handed" without their trophy summit picture.

IMHO those type of people tend to make up a large portion of the rescues and deaths that occur.

Anyways, subjects matter of this post not exactly conducive to drumming up new clientel, hahaha,

but on the off chance area51 or anybody else wants to climb something just shoot me a p.m. and can provide info, resume and references.

Take care all!

I understand your point, I think I mentioned early on that for a true moutain climber, Everest would naturally be something to shoot for, but for those who do it just to say they did it, I think is naive and dangerous.

On the other, no mountain climber, just one who does not like learning only part way. Once a curiosity gets stirred, I get obsessed about the subject and read nearly all I can. Regardless of what some might say here, I do not like discuss things beyond my limitations, so I emphasis my actual experience, but I like to discuss what I have learned with others, especially those who do have actual experience. Such discussions can verify if I am correct in my thinking or if I am completely off track.

Now, why would I care to learn so much about mountain climbing despite not having done any climbing nor have plans to do any climbing? I guess that answer is because I can, and it is interesting. I like learning, and when the next story comes out about disaster on Mount Everest or K2 or where ever, and my kids or wife or friends ask questions or make judgements, I will have the ability to answer.

I have always found knowledge, even about things we seemingly have no interest, have useful lessons and teachings. In mountain climbing, one can learn about psychology, sociology, and physiology. They are actually using high altitude climbers to learn more about heart problems in the elderly. The reason is, heart function and oxygen saturation aspects are similar for many elderly people as those who are at high altitude.

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Guest Deisel

I understand your point, I think I mentioned early on that for a true moutain climber, Everest would naturally be something to shoot for, but for those who do it just to say they did it, I think is naive and dangerous.

On the other, no mountain climber, just one who does not like learning only part way. Once a curiosity gets stirred, I get obsessed about the subject and read nearly all I can. Regardless of what some might say here, I do not like discuss things beyond my limitations, so I emphasis my actual experience, but I like to discuss what I have learned with others, especially those who do have actual experience. Such discussions can verify if I am correct in my thinking or if I am completely off track.

Now, why would I care to learn so much about mountain climbing despite not having done any climbing nor have plans to do any climbing? I guess that answer is because I can, and it is interesting. I like learning, and when the next story comes out about disaster on Mount Everest or K2 or where ever, and my kids or wife or friends ask questions or make judgements, I will have the ability to answer.

I have always found knowledge, even about things we seemingly have no interest, have useful lessons and teachings. In mountain climbing, one can learn about psychology, sociology, and physiology. They are actually using high altitude climbers to learn more about heart problems in the elderly. The reason is, heart function and oxygen saturation aspects are similar for many elderly people as those who are at high altitude.

Dyamox is an important tool for climbers Aid kits. I have had a close encounter with Dyamox and its no picnic. And that was at sea level. Hi altitude mountain sickness can effect the brain as well as the lungs. Each are different...

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AMS stands for Acute Mountain Sickness and is typically experienced as flu like symptoms. It's not fatal and will subside fairly quickly with a rapid descent of 4000ft or more. AMS left untreated and staying up high (bad) or ascending higher (really bad) can set you up for pulmonary edema or cerebral edema, both potentially fatal if untreated. AMS is actually a climbers friend, a warning system if you will- Your body saying "stop" go back down. Diamox can elevate symptoms of AMS but then you are basically removing the warning system so climbers taking Diamox tend to "crash" harder than those that do not.

Same with supplemental oxygen. Using O2 on a mountain effectively lowers the elevation by around 3500ft. So if you are on a high mountain and run out of 02 it's as though you were just dumped 3500ft higher than you were a few moments ago. That's a real danger and why good planning is needed and turn back times need to be adhered to. Or, just climb mountains you are capable of without supplemental oxygen, in then end climbing a 25,500ft mountain "clean" versus Everest using 02 is a similar physical challenge (assuming similar terrain features and is probably safer and better for the mountain since it won't be littered with spent 02 bottles.

Area51- I totally understand and appreciate your interest and desire to learn about climbing. I just read a cool book about a seemingly insane sailing race called the Whitbread, and I've never even been on a sail boat but was compelling reading about the adventure.

edited to add- you CAN get HAPE or HACE without ever experiencing signs or symptoms of AMS, but typically its AMS ignored and then the more serious complications of altitude illness hit. Check out the high altitude research done my Dr harles Houston, very interesting stuff. altituderesearch.org

Edited by AlpGuide

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That is a very steep glacier on Orizaba. Ropes, crampons and ice gear are your only thing stoping you from making a hasty decent. On this trip, we woke up, at high camp I believe, maybe lower, to the sounds of a helicopter dangling something below it. It was the body of a climber who fell, roughly where our picture was takin, here, just a few days before. There were 2 of them and 1 pulled the other off and they both died....

People slip and fall frequently on mnts...A famous female guide(Marty Hoey) who was assisting Frank Wells and **** Bass on their 1st ever SEVEN SUMMITs bid, slipped out of her harness on Everest, to her Death. She was a very experienced climber.

Here is a question I have. I understand the theory behind tying climbers together, and it seems good logic. Without a fixed guide rope, if one falls, the other catches, but the few stories I have read give me the impression that tying climbers together actually causes two fatalities instead of one. On this, I am sure I am ignorant, but it is hard to ignore stories like this.

The two Rangers at Ranier I mentioned were tied together. Though no one witnessed the accident, it is a good bet both did not fall at the same time, so it is likely one fell and took the other with him.

Also at Rainer, a man fell into a 80m deep crevasse. His climbing partner, who he was tied to, was fifty yards back, but got dragged in. The first climber, who fell, lived, and the second one died. It seems that as the first climber was falling, the second climber trying to arrest the fall, slowed the first climbers fall down the 80 meter crevasse. The problem was when the second climber fell in, he had no such protection and was killed.

These are only two stories, and surely lives have been saved this way that I have not read about, but I was wondering if this protocol has ever been reconsidered.

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Guest Deisel

Here is a question I have. I understand the theory behind tying climbers together, and it seems good logic. Without a fixed guide rope, if one falls, the other catches, but the few stories I have read give me the impression that tying climbers together actually causes two fatalities instead of one. On this, I am sure I am ignorant, but it is hard to ignore stories like this.

The two Rangers at Ranier I mentioned were tied together. Though no one witnessed the accident, it is a good bet both did not fall at the same time, so it is likely one fell and took the other with him.

Also at Rainer, a man fell into a 80m deep crevasse. His climbing partner, who he was tied to, was fifty yards back, but got dragged in. The first climber, who fell, lived, and the second one died. It seems that as the first climber was falling, the second climber trying to arrest the fall, slowed the first climbers fall down the 80 meter crevasse. The problem was when the second climber fell in, he had no such protection and was killed.

These are only two stories, and surely lives have been saved this way that I have not read about, but I was wondering if this protocol has ever been reconsidered.

You have good points and there are good points to be made on both accounts. #1. Having rope mates, spread out, can and has many times arrested a fallin climber. It also has, far fewer times swept all of them off the mnt. In general, without fixing Protection in the ice, the steeper the grade, the hesitant climbers are to rope in. Also of importance. A seasoned, better climber will ascend a spot while other climber, climbers, set up an anchor in case the lead climber falls. When the lead climber gets to a spot, he anchors in with Pro and belays the next climber up. Walking on glaciers is risky business and being in a rope team ads confidence. It also is responsible on less steeper inclines. Many scenario's involve solo climbing at a point, but that is advanced beyond the ordinary.

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Guest Deisel

Deisel,

Would you mind posting pictures of yourself on the tops of Rainier and Orizaba?

Kicker, this is my summit shot of Rainier. Beautiful day with 22 degree's and alittle wind at 7am.225978_1050033498485_2349_n.jpg

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Here is a question I have. I understand the theory behind tying climbers together, and it seems good logic. Without a fixed guide rope, if one falls, the other catches, but the few stories I have read give me the impression that tying climbers together actually causes two fatalities instead of one. On this, I am sure I am ignorant, but it is hard to ignore stories like this.

The two Rangers at Ranier I mentioned were tied together. Though no one witnessed the accident, it is a good bet both did not fall at the same time, so it is likely one fell and took the other with him.

Also at Rainer, a man fell into a 80m deep crevasse. His climbing partner, who he was tied to, was fifty yards back, but got dragged in. The first climber, who fell, lived, and the second one died. It seems that as the first climber was falling, the second climber trying to arrest the fall, slowed the first climbers fall down the 80 meter crevasse. The problem was when the second climber fell in, he had no such protection and was killed.

These are only two stories, and surely lives have been saved this way that I have not read about, but I was wondering if this protocol has ever been reconsidered.

Two on one rope on heavily glaciated is not ideal at all, but better than the alternative of no rope.

It's a complicated decision process to determine rope team #s and every scenario

is different, that said, two guys roped together on a big glacier should both be experienced

climbers and BOTH capable of self arrest and crevasse rescue.

The rangers on Rainier you refer to sound like two years ago, they responded to a rescue

and were on very familiar terrain and were unroped once on scene. One ranger slipped and because he was dealing with rescue issues (helping the victims) had no axe in his hand and fell to his death. He was a very experienced climber and ranger who had assisted on many rescues. It was a momentary lapse that cost him his life.

Steep is relative. Steep glacier for some is skiable and mellow for others. Orizaba's glacier

is low angle (30 to 35 degrees) or about a blue square intermediate ski run at Vail or Aspen.

Orizaba fatalities tend to be attributed to complacency because it's a beginner level mountain and

not very steep, people disregard the potential danger and often descend with poles instead of an axe, go too quickly or just f""& around. Two recent fatalities occurred when two guys had a foot race around the crater rim and slipped pulling each other off. Reckless and totally preventable. Doesn't mean the mountain can't be climbed easily and safely. That's climbing in a nutshell- respect the danger and NEVER get complacent. Hope that offered the insight you were looking for.

Edited by AlpGuide

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Guest Deisel

When the mnts are calm, you get scenes like this. You dig your tents in, anchor them strong, cause storms will rip them off easily. After I secured my tent on Rainier my 1st trip up, I hastily anchored my tent with hiking polls and 1 ice axe. As I was shifting around not thinking, my tent was yanked from the glacier, and into a crevass, with my pols and ice axe. Our lead guide repelled into the crevasse and retrieved my stuff. Thankfully......225012_1059237608582_551_n.jpg Another trick is to dig out your spot for your stuff and to make a little kitchen and seating area...

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On the subject, this was an interesting watch on Netflix about a disaster on K2:

IFCENT_SF70060.jpg

But it just kind of re-affirmed my desire to not be a frozen corpse on top of a mountain.

I watched that. If I remember, this event took some good climbers out. One climber they at first questioned his actions because he appeared to just go off to nowhere, but then it is believed he actually went back up to cut down some tangled up Koreans. There were lines at the bottleneck. I think there was an avalanche. A guy fell off a ledge after he had just told another guy to go around him. Several climbers saw objects, probably humans, falling in the dark. Screams were heard. Bodies were found, but who fell from where could never be figured out. It was just chaos all around. Again, it shows how things can quickly escalate out of control.

Edited by AREA 51

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Guest Deisel

I watched that. If I remember, this event took some good climbers out. One climber they at first questioned his actions because he appeared to just go off to nowhere, but then it is believed he actually went back up to cut down some tangled up Koreans. There were lines at the bottleneck. I think there was an avalanche. A guy fell off a ledge after he had just told another guy to go around him. Several climbers saw objects, probably humans, falling in the dark. Bodies were found, but who fell from where could never be figured out. It was just chaos all around. Again, it shows how things can quickly escalate out of control.

The guy that got swept by the avalanche had his wife next to him. Alot of good climbers died on this trip.

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Guest Deisel

Anyone want to guess what the biggest lie in the thread has been . . . . so far?

Please tell us Moses. Whats the biggest lie? We are all sitting on the edge of our Tents waiting for this pronouncement from high above.

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I appreciate the input, especially from those with climbing experience, Deisel and Alp. You both gave me a satisfactory answer to my rope question, but that tale about the two guys goofing around on the mountain is just unbelievable. Talk about a death wish.

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Guest Deisel

I appreciate the input, especially from those with climbing experience, Deisel and Alp. You both gave me a satisfactory answer to my rope question, but that tale about the two guys goofing around on the mountain is just unbelievable. Talk about a death wish.

Area51. Let me make a clearer point that seems to be bandying abt behind the scenes here. I have said many time before regarding the subject of climbing that I am Not a climbing guide. I've PM'd people to that regard as well. When I mentioned guiding I mean a Rope, independant from another, particularly on my summit of rainier. I do not mean to imply I am a guide of any sort. When I took my brother( who was not blood related but takin into my family later in his life) we climbed with him realizing my experiences in the related 5 or 6 years of climbing...There are professional guides who get paid, who have ton's of experience and are licensed guides. That is not me nor my qualifications.

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As I mentioned, all human events, good and bad, hold interest and teachings. The '96 Everest Disaster, which would take a whole thread to discuss, has been used to teach manangement, leadership, organization, psychology, and sociology. Acknowledging we all make mistakes, and no one mistake caused the disaster, I think analyzing what went wrong there is far from speaking ill of the dead. When death is involved, culpability is always discussed publicly, and learning from mistakes is the core of human knowledge. Hall and Fischer made mistakes, but so did nearly everyone on the mountain that day. The fact is, no one mistake was more costly than the other on its own. It was the accumalitive effect that was disasterous. However, Hall and Fischer were ultimately responsible for what transpired by the very nature of their position as the expedition leaders.

What is unfair to Hall and Fischer, is they are not around to write a book describing their experience. I have not read any of them, but many participants wrote books. I do understand these contained attaching blame, accusations, rebuttals, and counter accusations, with smaller admissions that they shared some culpability in their own circumstances.

Even though it has been anaylzed to death, I like discussing such things, because it makes clear a truth that no tragedy, disaster, or event is ever the sole blame of one person. Usually, multiple errors, by multiple people, add up to the eventual end catastrophe. That is where the lessons those who died are teaching us.

The only death in vain, is a death not learned from.

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On the subject, this was an interesting watch on Netflix about a disaster on K2:

IFCENT_SF70060.jpg

But it just kind of re-affirmed my desire to not be a frozen corpse on top of a mountain.

I watched that last night, thanks for posting it.

It occurs to me: I've been to "Atlanta Rocks" for some kid parties and it's fun to harness up and do the climbs. Of course, I suck. I get fatigued. I'm fat and have no upper body strength. And I fall sometimes.

So next time I have a REALLY bad case of the flue, I'm going to stay up for a few days straight, then put on all the cold weather gear I own and head over to Atlanta Rocks. I will put on some crampons, some HUGE gloves, and put crushed ice against my skin inside of the clothing. Before I start climbing, I'll get a drink so I can use the straw as the only way to breathe. If I fall, I will have to pretend that I'm going off into space for 3000 and if anyone tries to help me they will die.

I think that would about capture the Ultra Mountaineering experience.

Which is not to say that I don't see the attraction of it. Because I do. It would be incredible. And I understand that those who truly "Respect the Mountain" are perfectly capable of handling all of the challenges I just described. The elite climbers are some of the best athletes on the planet, no doubt.

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My real name is Chuck Crawford.

"Diesel" real first name is Robert (Ed) and I have read enough!

Alright...this is gonna be long but THE TRUTH!!!

First of all Robert is lying through is teeth about everything

But mostly about Rainier!!!!!

Day 1 Approach trail-----

Me: Come on Robert "slow mofo"

Robert: Need to rest.

Me: Come on Robert "slower mofo"

Robert: Need to rest

Inner Glacier-----

Me: Come on Robert

Robert: Rest step...pause

Rest step pause

Me: Hey the 50 something year old skiers are blowing us out of the water.

Going up hill

Robert: Lets rope up

Me: Sh@t...guess I'm going to short rope him.

Day 2 Summit-----

I was in back because I weighed the most.

Me: Hey Scott!!! Robert looks messed up!!! That MF is so jacked up he is cross step and losing his balance!!!

We were on the rime ice and I took the lead in case he fell I could arrest his fall!!!

On the summit Robert TOTALLY collapsed!!!

Descent-----

Robert: Hey Chuck you see Scott (pro guide and super bad ***)

Me: Nope but let's find him now!

Robert: I can get us down.

Me: **** NO...I would rather untie then to let you lead me!!!

We found Scott and his group was crossing over a crevasse and Robert dropped is camera it slid into space...

Me: To the other guy with us...."Hey you take lead and I'll take anchor and if that MF falls one of can arrest the fall and hopefully he will not kill us both"

After we descended another 1500 feet or so we amazingly found his camera on a F'ed up snow bridge!!!

Robert: Hey can you belay me down to get my camera so I have proof I finally submitted Rainier?

Me: That thing looks weak as ****...are you serious?!?.

Robert: duh ya

Me: Praying

We traveled on for a bit and got to The Corridor and I untied and hauled arss to high camp.

We roped up again to get to the Inner Glacier and once there I untied and glacaded the enter Inner Glacier. Robert followed.

At bottom of the Inner

Me: You Good???

Robert: Yes

Me: See ya...wouldn't wanna be ya. McDonalds here I come...need salt!!!

A month later I saw Robert at a climbing event.

Robert: Hey man...you know when you took off down the trial??? I forgot my shoes where in your car...I had to go into town in my socks to buy a new pair!!!

Me:LOL...really???

Robert: You still got them?

Me: Nope...didn't see them

TRUTH---> I trashed his shoes!!!!!

I am pissing myself right now think back about that trip and how Robert "guided"

Robert is a nice enough guy but the stories on this thread are NOT TRUE!!!!

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My real name is Chuck Crawford.

"Diesel" real first name is Robert (Ed) and I have read enough!

Alright...this is gonna be long but THE TRUTH!!!

First of all Robert is lying through is teeth about everything

But mostly about Rainier!!!!!

Day 1 Approach trail-----

Me: Come on Robert "slow mofo"

Robert: Need to rest.

Me: Come on Robert "slower mofo"

Robert: Need to rest

Inner Glacier-----

Me: Come on Robert

Robert: Rest step...pause

Rest step pause

Me: Hey the 50 something year old skiers are blowing us out of the water.

Going up hill

Robert: Lets rope up

Me: Sh@t...guess I'm going to short rope him.

Day 2 Summit-----

I was in back because I weighed the most.

Me: Hey Scott!!! Robert looks messed up!!! That MF is so jacked up he is cross step and losing his balance!!!

We were on the rime ice and I took the lead in case he fell I could arrest his fall!!!

On the summit Robert TOTALLY collapsed!!!

Descent-----

Robert: Hey Chuck you see Scott (pro guide and super bad ***)

Me: Nope but let's find him now!

Robert: I can get us down.

Me: **** NO...I would rather untie then to let you lead me!!!

We found Scott and his group was crossing over a crevasse and Robert dropped is camera it slid into space...

Me: To the other guy with us...."Hey you take lead and I'll take anchor and if that MF falls one of can arrest the fall and hopefully he will not kill us both"

After we descended another 1500 feet or so we amazingly found his camera on a F'ed up snow bridge!!!

Robert: Hey can you belay me down to get my camera so I have proof I finally submitted Rainier?

Me: That thing looks weak as ****...are you serious?!?.

Robert: duh ya

Me: Praying

We traveled on for a bit and got to The Corridor and I untied and hauled arss to high camp.

We roped up again to get to the Inner Glacier and once there I untied and glacaded the enter Inner Glacier. Robert followed.

At bottom of the Inner

Me: You Good???

Robert: Yes

Me: See ya...wouldn't wanna be ya. McDonalds here I come...need salt!!!

A month later I saw Robert at a climbing event.

Robert: Hey man...you know when you took off down the trial??? I forgot my shoes where in your car...I had to go into town in my socks to buy a new pair!!!

Me:LOL...really???

Robert: You still got them?

Me: Nope...didn't see them

TRUTH---> I trashed his shoes!!!!!

I am pissing myself right now think back about that trip and how Robert "guided"

Robert is a nice enough guy but the stories on this thread are NOT TRUE!!!!

For posterity.

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My real name is Chuck Crawford.

"Diesel" real first name is Robert (Ed) and I have read enough!

Alright...this is gonna be long but THE TRUTH!!!

First of all Robert is lying through is teeth about everything

But mostly about Rainier!!!!!

Day 1 Approach trail-----

Me: Come on Robert "slow mofo"

Robert: Need to rest.

Me: Come on Robert "slower mofo"

Robert: Need to rest

Inner Glacier-----

Me: Come on Robert

Robert: Rest step...pause

Rest step pause

Me: Hey the 50 something year old skiers are blowing us out of the water.

Going up hill

Robert: Lets rope up

Me: Sh@t...guess I'm going to short rope him.

Day 2 Summit-----

I was in back because I weighed the most.

Me: Hey Scott!!! Robert looks messed up!!! That MF is so jacked up he is cross step and losing his balance!!!

We were on the rime ice and I took the lead in case he fell I could arrest his fall!!!

On the summit Robert TOTALLY collapsed!!!

Descent-----

Robert: Hey Chuck you see Scott (pro guide and super bad ***)

Me: Nope but let's find him now!

Robert: I can get us down.

Me: **** NO...I would rather untie then to let you lead me!!!

We found Scott and his group was crossing over a crevasse and Robert dropped is camera it slid into space...

Me: To the other guy with us...."Hey you take lead and I'll take anchor and if that MF falls one of can arrest the fall and hopefully he will not kill us both"

After we descended another 1500 feet or so we amazingly found his camera on a F'ed up snow bridge!!!

Robert: Hey can you belay me down to get my camera so I have proof I finally submitted Rainier?

Me: That thing looks weak as ****...are you serious?!?.

Robert: duh ya

Me: Praying

We traveled on for a bit and got to The Corridor and I untied and hauled arss to high camp.

We roped up again to get to the Inner Glacier and once there I untied and glacaded the enter Inner Glacier. Robert followed.

At bottom of the Inner

Me: You Good???

Robert: Yes

Me: See ya...wouldn't wanna be ya. McDonalds here I come...need salt!!!

A month later I saw Robert at a climbing event.

Robert: Hey man...you know when you took off down the trial??? I forgot my shoes where in your car...I had to go into town in my socks to buy a new pair!!!

Me:LOL...really???

Robert: You still got them?

Me: Nope...didn't see them

TRUTH---> I trashed his shoes!!!!!

I am pissing myself right now think back about that trip and how Robert "guided"

Robert is a nice enough guy but the stories on this thread are NOT TRUE!!!!

is this a joke or a true story? If its a true story, coming online to call out one of your friends is a ***** move

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