Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
AREA 51

The Dark Side Of Climbing Mount Everest

Recommended Posts

<p> Remember how cold that beer was the second time at the summit? Whoo!

it soundz like u have a drinking prollem, bruh, i think u could use sum councilling

#GarrowKarez2014

Edited by Garrow69

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Area51, I've climbed a number of mnts and have been in Very rare air. It seems that with each climb, no matter the mnt, there are rescues and even deaths on each.

I would imagine at your height, Kennesaw Mountain would seem like Everest.

Eye am just kidding of course.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was rather randomly directed to this forum post. Its interesting to see non-climbers perspectives on these things. And from a non-climbing perspective its does at least appear to be a rather suicidal undertaking to attempt Everest or K2, but really it is not. Cave diving is probably more dangerous, as are some other leisure/hobby activities.

Is it safe as golf, or bass fishing? No its definitely not. But there are people who have safely and comfortably summited Everest a dozen times and more.

The general public tends to focus on the accidents and death because its makes for much better adventure reading than the story of a guy who cruised up, took a few pictures, and cruised back down. The people that get in trouble are the guys who want to climb something so they can brag about it in the bar and impress people at social gatherings. Those types typically want the notoriety of "climber" without putting in the work to gain the mental and physical conditioning necessary to climb safely and in control.

Everest just takes the bragging rights to a very high level. That goes for K2 as well, which is also being commercially guided and has been for almost 10 years. Humans will always push their limits. For me as a climber I think its crazy (and pointless) to run a 100mile ultra, some people enjoy it. Some guys like jumping out of planes or off buildings or surfing 70ft waves, again, not for me, but certainly appeals to many adventurous people.

Anyways, interesting perspectives being thrown around.

Edited by AlpGuide

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest fibonacci

good read. thanks. never thought about it before.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dragging a parachute and pressure suit up that mountain only makes it tougher and the winds make descent uncontrollable

FYI- Men have paraglided from the summit of Everest. The rig is not very heavy at all, way lighter than an Imax camera. Not sure what a pressure suit is, but they didn't use one, wore the standard goosedown suits. Also, a Sherpa soloed to the summit, pitched a tent and camped on the summit, then came down the next day. Its also been skied from the summit a few times.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Area 51. Don't forget to post a pic of this guy's corpse on top of a mountain when the time comes.

2390790-9351094816-i-kid.jpg

Well THAT was a completely unnecessarily offensive post.

edit: . . . Obviously you are kidding, kidding . . . still not funny . . . or welcoming to the new guy who actually has substantively contributed to this pretty compelling thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Deisel

Pico De Orizaba between 17,000 and 18,000 ft in this shot. Rarified air in many ways. This is a mountain that can be climbed by novice climbers, as it was my real 1st climb, and can offer all the experiences someone wanting a go at it, could want. This mountain is a 7 day trip. orizabassummit.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was rather randomly directed to this forum post. Its interesting to see non-climbers perspectives on these things. And from a non-climbing perspective its does at least appear to be a rather suicidal undertaking to attempt Everest or K2, but really it is not. Cave diving is probably more dangerous, as are some other leisure/hobby activities.

Is it safe as golf, or bass fishing? No its definitely not. But there are people who have safely and comfortably summited Everest a dozen times and more.

The general public tends to focus on the accidents and death because its makes for much better adventure reading than the story of a guy who cruised up, took a few pictures, and cruised back down. The people that get in trouble are the guys who want to climb something so they can brag about it in the bar and impress people at social gatherings. Those types typically want the notoriety of "climber" without putting in the work to gain the mental and physical conditioning necessary to climb safely and in control.

Everest just takes the bragging rights to a very high level. That goes for K2 as well, which is also being commercially guided and has been for almost 10 years. Humans will always push their limits. For me as a climber I think its crazy (and pointless) to run a 100mile ultra, some people enjoy it. Some guys like jumping out of planes or off buildings or surfing 70ft waves, again, not for me, but certainly appeals to many adventurous people.

Anyways, interesting perspectives being thrown around.

I appreciate your input, and I agree. I made sure to mention in my original post that I have never climbed, so with that in mind, I try not to criticize too much of what I do not know about. My real point here was not to knock mountain climbing. It was to tell the unique story of Mount Everest. The fact that many have and do attempt its summit even though they must track over and around the bodies of those who have tried before, and that excluding war, there is no other activity where people must ignore such constant reminders of the danger they are in.

I tried, more or less, to explain climbing, the changes in mountain climbing and climbers, why helping other climbers is dangerous, how climbers die, and then why most of the dead are left on the mountain. From a laymen's point, many may think climbers to be uncaring or callous, but after reading up on climbing, I understand exactly why David Sharp died and why Everest and K2 are frozen graveyards.

Edited by AREA 51

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Deisel

I'm on the bottom of this pic, nearing 16,000 feet on Orizaba. 1396025_10202786918221445_468344188_n.jpg

This is approaching High camp on the way up Rainer(I know how to spell it but I love the spelling police's comments) 10152667_10202787018663956_310697584_n.jpg This was in the day when it was still cool to wear US Postal Service hats...I still like the hat, but not the foam mattress that I slept on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Area 51. Don't forget to post a pic of this guy's corpse on top of a mountain when the time comes.

2390790-9351094816-i-kid.jpg

Not to belabor the issue here, but I think AlpGuide's point is that, while there is certainly risk in mountaineering, the public has a slanted perspective of the extent of that risk because of the wannabe posers who make attempts without the necessary respect and preparation, and the commercial guides who profit from them. It sounds like AlpGuide does it out of a passion for the adventure rather than the bragging.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If we breakdown certain aspects they are easier to handle. On the subject of climbers seemingly ignoring distressed climbers, this is not entirely true, and there are a few human dynamics at work here. Why David Sharp, and many others like him, are left to die is not a simple explanation, but comes in many parts.

First, any distressed climber that is conscious and mobile, will be helped by other climbers. Just a week after David Sharp died another climber, Lincoln Hall, was also left for dead, but the next day he woke up. He was lucid and could walk, and several climbers stopped their summit attempt and helped him down.

Climbers can and will offer aid and help a person descend to a safer altitude, but that person must be able to move. This is important, because any climber up near the summit is under alot of physical stress themselves, so there are limits on what they can do. The fact is, it is impossible to carry a person down the mountain, and simply staying so high for long periods is dangerous for anyone. This part needs to be emphasised more to amatuer climbers. Help is not as simple as dialing 911, and did forget to mention that helicopters height limit, on average, of about 14000 feet, so any climber in distress must get to the lower altitude.

Second, in studying such behavior, as leaving people to die, a simple theory explains that if we feel closer to those we climb with, such as was the case with the old climbing expeditions with friends or colleagues, the farther one will go to help. Commercial expeditions put many strangers together climbing without any close associates, thus no one is ready to risk their lives to save them. David Sharp was climbing completely alone. This is not cold or uncaring, just basic human psychology.

This psychology may explain why Rob Hall felt compelled to stay with Doug Hansen despite Hansen being passed the realistic point of help. Hansen had climbed with Hall the year before and was turned back short of the summit. There was a relationship there, and I am not sure Hall would have gone the extra for anyone else. It was a bad, may even unreasonable decision, no doubt. He left a family behind, and Hansen was stubborn and illogical in continuing his climb, but nevertheless, Hall's actions are honorable and explainable in many respects.

Third, as callous as it may appear, the true climber understands the limitations there are on getting help if they get in trouble. There is no calling 911. Helicopters have a ceiling of about 14000 feet. I think many amatuer climbers are either not fully told or do not really grasp this, The same goes for outsiders who criticize what appears to them as selfish actions. Rob Hall, after Hansen had died, knew very well that he was in a fatal situation. He had been up there too long and his legs were frozen. so on his last radio call, he asked not for help, but to speak to his wife. He knew helping him now was just not possible.

Edited by AREA 51

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm on the bottom of this pic, nearing 16,000 feet on Orizaba. 1396025_10202786918221445_468344188_n.jpg

Is that a glacier? I know those are dangerous. One miss step and one slides right off the mountain. Two stories I read.

One, a Taiwanese climber got out of his tent on Everest without his climbing boots and slid off.

Second one, was at Mt. Rainer you speak of, when two young, inexperienced Rangers apparently slid on a glacier and fell 1200 feet off the mountain while attempting a rescue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I pretty much agree with everything area51 just posted (you sure you're not a climber? J/k)

One thing though would be rescue- as rescue capabilities have increased many climbers, typically

novices, develop a false sense of security in falsely assuming that rescue IS just a cell phone call

or Spot Beacon signal away. Sometimes it is, sometimes it's not, personally I wouldn't bet my life

on it and go into any climb as prepared and self-reliant as possible.

To everyone posting- people climb for different reasons, just like any difficult endeavor. Some for

glory, some for self-discovery, some for the physical challenge. As a guide I actually have clients

that go climb something so they can feel empowered by facing their fear of heights.

It's not my place to judge why somebody does something but from my and many others perspective if you are one of the people attracted to climb Everest or any mountain for that matter simply because you want to brag about how you climbed something others have died on. I think at the very least your motives are in poor taste and more than likely you're motives may get you in trouble as is witnessed every year on mountains all over the world when people spend $ to go there (guided or not)and don't want to return "empty handed" without their trophy summit picture. IMHO those type of people tend to make up a large portion of the rescues and deaths that occur.

Take care all!

Edited by AlpGuide

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
  • Create New...