Jump to content

Pros And Cons Of The Hurry-Up/no-Huddle/checkdown Offense


Mr. Right
 Share

Recommended Posts

In the NFL, teams continually try to invent (or reinvent) offensive strategies that may take advantage of inefficieces in current defensive schemes. For example, a few years ago, the Wildcat formation helped an otherwise hapless Dolphins win the AFC East. Last year, the read option helped many teams with mobile QBs reach the playoffs. This year, Chip Kelly's up tempo offense led to the Eagles having the 3rd most yards/game.

In the quest to be avant garde in the NFL, the Falcons have also devised their own signature offensive scheme - the hurry-up/no-huddle/checkdown offense. While this formation has not been fully implemented in the playbook, we did get a glimpse of it during the end of games and especially during garbage time. What's innovative about this offense is that it manages to combine two dichotomous philosphies within one play. On the one hand, there is the the hurry-up/no-huddle offense, which is usually utlized if a team wanted catch the defense off guard or if the offense needed to score points in a hurry. On the other hand, the checkdown is used to chew time off the clock or to lull the defense to sleep. The hurry-up/no-huddle/checkdown offense effectively combines aggression with pacifism, which is just mindboggling marvelous. It's like putting a Ferarri engine into a family station wagon. Are you trying to go fast? Or are you taking your family to church? Because what is the defense to think when you are trying to score, but not really trying to score? Or when you are trying to run down the clock, but not really trying to run down the clock?

The HU/NH/CD offense was very effective in the few times we ran it this year. In fact, I seem to almost recall a 100% success rate in capturing yards. As with any innovative offensive scheme, I like to examine the pros and cons of the offense.

Pros:

-High success rate

-Increases completion %

-Decreases turnovers

-Helps pad stats

-Lulls defense to sleep

-Easily implemented by game managers

-Short/intermediate routes does not tire out offense

-RBs are involved in passing game

-Confuses defense (hard to gameplan for offense that can't make up it's mind - it's like predicting the next steps of a random walk)

-Ball only has to travel 2 yards down the field

-Versatile as both mobile and statue QBs can run the offense (as opposed to read option in which you need a mobile QB)

Cons:

-Tough to think of any

Considerations:

-While the hurry up/no huddle saves time, the checkdown pass uses up time

As the NFL is a copy cat league, any thoughts on the HU/NH/CD offense being more widely used? Any cons you can think of?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't stand it running QB's after watching that bowl game today only reiterates to me why I don't like it.

Both those QB's especially today should have just handed the ball off to there RB's.

When I see guys like Manziel running like there bullet proof outside the pocket only tells me they should upgrade there health insurance before heading to the NFL as they will get killed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't stand it running QB's after watching that bowl game today only reiterates to me why I don't like it.

Both those QB's especially today should have just handed the ball off to there RB's.

When I see guys like Manziel running like there bullet proof outside the pocket only tells me they should upgrade there health insurance before heading to the NFL as they will get killed.

There isn't much QB running involved in the hurry-up/no-huddle/checkdown offense. In fact, it's encouraged to get rid of the ball ASAP to the reciever nearest to the line of scrimage.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't stand it running QB's after watching that bowl game today only reiterates to me why I don't like it.

Both those QB's especially today should have just handed the ball off to there RB's.

When I see guys like Manziel running like there bullet proof outside the pocket only tells me they should upgrade there health insurance before heading to the NFL as they will get killed.

I didn't watch the Bowl game but I agree the running QBs need to hand the ball off to a RB.

How many running QBs won Bowls the last five years? Lemme see here:

2008 - Ben

2009 - Brees

2010 - Rogers

2011 - Eli

2012 - Flacco

None. Russell, Kap or Cam could win one this year but probably not if they don't run their RBs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The HUNCHED offense leaves one breathless. I can't tell you how many times I just said "huh? what was that?" this season. Screaming over and over at the hand-picked O-lines inability to protect one of the games best deep-ball throwers from only one season before. However, I am confident that HUNCHED will be returned to the "Koetter Bomb Power Lob" once again. After all, the #6 pick in the draft will NOT be used on a skill-position player.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It really ticks me off when we throw the ball three yards in front of the first down just to be tackled short.

Checking down the ball is one thing. It's a valid strategy. But when you are down by 2 scores or more and run the hurry up/no huddle checkdown offense, that's just mindboggling.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Eh, KiwiFalcon, nobody gets killed in the pussified NFL anymore, we have QBs running free all over the place and if you even touch them you get called/ fined. Back in the good old days these read option QB's would last about 1 set of downs before ending up a pile of broken bones and shredded tendons and ligaments in the back of a Cushman cart heading for the dressing\ I mean emergency room.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Who said that checking down is part of the hurry-up offense?

Hurry-up/no-huddle is used to speed up the tempo pre-snap and catch defenses off guard in their coverages, it has nothing to do with how fast you get rid of the ball post-snap as far as I know.

What is causing more checkdowns is an O-line that doesn't allow enough time for plays to develop and WRs to get open deep. Please explain to me why this has anything to do with the no-huddle.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Who said that checking down is part of the hurry-up offense?

Hurry-up/no-huddle is used to speed up the tempo pre-snap and catch defenses off guard in their coverages, it has nothing to do with how fast you get rid of the ball post-snap as far as I know.

What is causing more checkdowns is an O-line that doesn't allow enough time for plays to develop and WRs to get open deep. Please explain to me why this has anything to do with the no-huddle.

Truth. I go to the games. They barely run long deep routes because the line doesn't give him the time. Most times nobody is open and that was mainly because one man could handle an injured Roddy for 3/4 of the season and you could bracket Tony. I played football and watched football my whole life. It has nothing to do with Matt Ryan not being able to get the ball deep. It's that bs line and lack of running game. I've seen the few times he had guys open deep down the field but got sacked.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is clear you know nothing about Football. No cons? Really? For starters, it drastically increases your chance of a turnover. For that reason alone the majority of NFL teams don't use it unless absolutely necessary. Which is why it is most prevalent in the last half of the 4th qtr in the NFL

Wait. Did I just read you correctly? Checking down the ball increases the chance of a turnover? How so?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh I get it. Should have known that a seemingly positive post from Mr. Troll was in fact an invitation do do his trolling for him by other people coming up with the cons.

Sorry trolls, Ryan got his money, the O-line proved they're the primary problem, so you're gonna have to wait one more year to cherry pick why it's somehow all Ryan's fault.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Who said that checking down is part of the hurry-up offense?

Hurry-up/no-huddle is used to speed up the tempo pre-snap and catch defenses off guard in their coverages, it has nothing to do with how fast you get rid of the ball post-snap as far as I know.

What is causing more checkdowns is an O-line that doesn't allow enough time for plays to develop and WRs to get open deep. Please explain to me why this has anything to do with the no-huddle.

Traditionally, checking down isn't part of the hurry up/no huddle offense. That's why I said this philosphy was innovative because it combines the two. Yes, hurry up is to catch the defense off guard, but checking it down completely defeats the purpose of the hurry up. Very avant garde. We saw the Falcons experiment with this scheme at the end of games when we needed to score, but we ended up checking the ball down.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Truth. I go to the games. They barely run long deep routes because the line doesn't give him the time. Most times nobody is open and that was mainly because one man could handle an injured Roddy for 3/4 of the season and you could bracket Tony. I played football and watched football my whole life. It has nothing to do with Matt Ryan not being able to get the ball deep. It's that bs line and lack of running game. I've seen the few times he had guys open deep down the field but got sacked.

AT the end of games, defenses generally run the prevent D. We didn't really use this offense during games, but we mainly tested it at the end of games when the game was already lost.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

AT the end of games, defenses generally run the prevent D. We didn't really use this offense during games, but we mainly tested it at the end of games when the game was already lost.

That's not necessarily true. I watched every home game and NY, NE, SL, NO, Car played us tight man to man at the end of the game. We were in every game at home so none of them were already lost. Maybe one game was a blowout at home. Can't remember. I saw nobody playing prevent against us this year at home on the final drives. Mostly everybody took a page out of NE's strategy against us. Tight man to man. Especially when Julio went down. There was no need to play zone because Roddy and Julio were out and nobody was gonna blow the top off the defense. As for check downs he had no choice. Guys were not getting open and when they did he was pressured and or sacked. The check down was necessary not because Matt couldnt make a throw but because that was the only option. If you don't go to the games tv will not show you this. The camera only follows the ball and the wr's run off screen. Unless you get the all 22 then you can see what I see at the games. Not saying Matt hasn't missed some open guys cause he has. They all do but he just didn't have time usually.

Edited by TheFatboi
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wish I could tape parts of the game to show you what I"m talking about.

I know what you're trying to say but I see what's going on in the games myself. A lot of these guys may not know the game from an X's and O's perspective but I do. I know exactly what I'm looking at and understand concepts of plays.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...