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On Julio Jones' Re-Injury...


Jigglypuff
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Folks, the man is a beast. In case you didn't see the recent highlight video posted,

http://boards.atlant...eer-highlights/

[quote

]If a Jones fracture fails to unite (malunion or non union), which is a common problem with these fractures, it can become a chronic condition. If this is the case, podiatrists will likely recommend that the patient spend more time in a cast, up to twenty weeks.

http://en.wikipedia..../Jones_fracture

and we leveraged the future of the franchise on Julio by trading away the farm. According to Wikipedia, Julio Jones' injury could take up to 5 month to heal... THINK WHAT THAT WOULD DO TO HIS CAREER. That could compromise his foot and he might have further injury to his ACL or knee or ankle on that foot. He could have a season ending injury in the future if this injury doesn't heal up and become chronic. I pray he gets better we need to let him rest AS LONG AS IT TAKES to fully heal!!

Further citation:

It's a study from 2002

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11798997

http://www.wheelessonline.com/ortho/jones_fracture

Outcomes:

- in the report by Larson CM, et al (2002), 15 patients (mean age, 21.7 years) underwent cannulated screw fixation of a Jones fracture;

- there were six treatment failures: four refractures and two symptomatic nonunions;

- mean time to full activity was 6.8 weeks for the patients with failure compared with 9 weeks for patients who did not have complications;

- although all patients were asymptomatic and radiographically progressing to union before return to full activity, only one of six patients with failures had complete radiographic union, compared with six of seven patients with no complications;

- there was a higher proportion of elite athletes (division I or professional level) among the failure group (83%) compared with those without complications (11%)

2005: Screw is better treatment than just a cast:

CONCLUSION:

There is a high incidence (44%) of failure after cast treatment of acute Jones fractures. Early screw fixation results in quicker times to union and return to sports compared with cast treatment.

Edited by FALCONSFAN1492
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Whenever I have surgery and seek the correct prognosis, the very first place I go is Wikipedia.

After all, what idiot would listen to the surgeon who performed the surgery when Wikipedia is there to tell you what to expect in the healing process?

you listened to Julio Jones' surgeon say otherwise?

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Whenever I have surgery and seek the correct prognosis, the very first place I go is Wikipedia.

After all, what idiot would listen to the surgeon who performed the surgery when Wikipedia is there to tell you what to expect in the healing process?

LOL.....that's pretty funny....but often true. Referring to the Wikipedia comment.
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and we leveraged the future of the franchise on Julio by trading away the farm.

I agree, the future of the franchise is ruined. Especially during this years draft, when we will have all of our picks. And next years draft as well, when we will have all of our draft picks.

Let's just convince Blank to sell the team to a different business man in a different city already. It's over.

Edited by abstract
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I agree, the future of the franchise is ruined. Especially during this years draft, when we will have all of our picks. And next years draft as well, when we will have all of our draft picks.

Let's just convince Blank to sell the team to a different business man in a different city already. It's over.

yeah, now we're paying in the present rather than the future as people said 2 years ago

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Yeah it didn't sound good when I heard it was a jones fracture.

Actually the most amusing thing was watching swift post different quotes about surgical screws...

The prognosis isn't great but rest assured he's getting the best treatment possible. From what I read one of the main issues these things don't heal properly is lack of blood flow to the area. I know doctors can use certain types of techniques and medications to address this.

If all else fails they can always inject stem cells into his foot.

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Yeah it didn't sound good when I heard it was a jones fracture.

Actually the most amusing thing was watching swift post different quotes about surgical screws...

The prognosis isn't great but rest assured he's getting the best treatment possible. From what I read one of the main issues these things don't heal properly is lack of blood flow to the area. I know doctors can use certain types of techniques and medications to address this.

If all else fails they can always inject stem cells into his foot.

lol stem cells, yeah they would spend that kind of money on it lol. probably the platelet rich/plasma rich blood treatment from that book about the TE/WR writer guy

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15559691

Jones fractures in the elite football player. (study done in 2004)

Low K, Noblin JD, Browne JE, Barnthouse CD, Scott AR.

The Jones fracture, defined as a proximal junctional metaphyseal/diaphyseal fracture of the fifth metatarsal, presents a challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon, especially in the competitive athlete. The purpose of this study is to characterize the Jones fracture in the elite athletic community and review the variety of treatments for these fractures in the National Football League (NFL). Between 1988 and 2002, 4758 elite collegiate football players participated in the NFL Combine. All athletes were evaluated clinically and radiographically. There were 86 Jones fractures identified in 83 athletes (incidence of 1.8%). Fifty-three percent (46 of 86) of the fractures were treated surgically. Eighty-nine percent (41 of 46) healed without complications and 7% (3 of 46) developed a nonunion. Twenty percent (8 of 40) of the fractures treated nonoperatively developed a nonunion while 80% (32 of 40) healed. The NFL injury surveillance system was also studied and revealed 17 Jones fractures occurred during the seasons 1996--2001. All of these fractures were treated with intramedullary screw fixation. The union rate was 94% (16 of 17 fractures). A questionnaire was also sent to all NFL team physicians regarding their experience with these fractures. The concensus was that this is not a common injury, but when it occurs, surgical treatment is recommended (77%) over nonsurgical treatment (23%). After reviewing the data, it was found that intramedullary screw fixation of Jones fractures is the treatment of choice for most physicians who treat elite collegiate and professional football athletes.

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It's weird that its called a Jones Fracture. Made me think. Deeps thoughts. Maybe in the future , the. nickname for a really bad Offensive Line in the NFL can be called a " Dimitroff" Line. like the "Tampa 2" defense or "WestCoast Offense" Like in the movie Kingpin when the guy says he just got "Munsoned". LoL

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15559691

Jones fractures in the elite football player. (study done in 2004)

Low K, Noblin JD, Browne JE, Barnthouse CD, Scott AR.

The Jones fracture, defined as a proximal junctional metaphyseal/diaphyseal fracture of the fifth metatarsal, presents a challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon, especially in the competitive athlete. The purpose of this study is to characterize the Jones fracture in the elite athletic community and review the variety of treatments for these fractures in the National Football League (NFL). Between 1988 and 2002, 4758 elite collegiate football players participated in the NFL Combine. All athletes were evaluated clinically and radiographically. There were 86 Jones fractures identified in 83 athletes (incidence of 1.8%). Fifty-three percent (46 of 86) of the fractures were treated surgically. Eighty-nine percent (41 of 46) healed without complications and 7% (3 of 46) developed a nonunion. Twenty percent (8 of 40) of the fractures treated nonoperatively developed a nonunion while 80% (32 of 40) healed. The NFL injury surveillance system was also studied and revealed 17 Jones fractures occurred during the seasons 1996--2001. All of these fractures were treated with intramedullary screw fixation. The union rate was 94% (16 of 17 fractures). A questionnaire was also sent to all NFL team physicians regarding their experience with these fractures. The concensus was that this is not a common injury, but when it occurs, surgical treatment is recommended (77%) over nonsurgical treatment (23%). After reviewing the data, it was found that intramedullary screw fixation of Jones fractures is the treatment of choice for most physicians who treat elite collegiate and professional football athletes.

I thought you were all about listening to the actual surgeon rather than internet sources?

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I thought you were all about listening to the actual surgeon rather than internet sources?

Naturally, because quoting a study done by Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, University of Missouri, Kansas City, and published on United States Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health that shows NFL players have an excellent chance at recovery from a Jones Fracture is exactly like quoting Wikipedia where the OP concluded Julio's career is most likely over .....same thing
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Naturally, because quoting a study done by Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, University of Missouri, Kansas City, and published on United States Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health is exactly like quoting Wikipedia.....same thing

"Medical Information

It is not the intention of NLM to provide specific medical advice but rather to provide users with information to better understand their health and their diagnosed disorders. Specific medical advice will not be provided, and NLM urges you to consult with a qualified physician for diagnosis and for answers to your personal questions."

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/About/disclaimer.html

funny, they share your original opinion on the matter

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"Medical Information

It is not the intention of NLM to provide specific medical advice but rather to provide users with information to better understand their health and their diagnosed disorders. Specific medical advice will not be provided, and NLM urges you to consult with a qualified physician for diagnosis and for answers to your personal questions."

http://www.ncbi.nlm....disclaimer.html

funny, they share your original opinion on the matter

soooooooo, you think that Empirical data is "medical advice". Ok, I see.
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