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Good Read In The Ajc About Offensive Line


FRALIC
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wouldn't it make more sense to flip him & Mike Johnson and put them back in their natural positions? Johnson was an ALL-American OG after all, and was a road grater for arguably one of the best running teams in a division full of dominant DTs. sometimes we shoot ourselves in the foot

Mike Johnson goes on IR every time night falls on him. He can't play anywhere, because he can never stay healthy.

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I looked at 4 olines that are perceived to be really good:NE, DEN, CIN, SF. The one thing that stood out to me and was constant across all 4 lines was the lowest draft pick used, was always on the center position. None were higher than a 5th round pick and some were udfas.

Just thought that was interesting.

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And that would be me.

Just to be clear, "butt-muncher" was a joke in response to you saying to resume the name-calling.

Show me a blocking stance that would utilize the motions of the bench press. The bench press isolates upper body muscles. Lower body strength is vastly more important than arm/chest strength in offensive line play.

Like I said, I never benched at all. Not at all. I deadlifted and did the clean & jerk. Lifts that required total body strength. I grew up idolizing Vasily Alekseyev

imago01583463m.jpg

(my dad HATED my rooting for a godless commie over Americans), and got a weight bench for my 11th birthday so I could be just like him.

I already linked you an article about Wisconsin linemen typically performing poorly at the bench press, because they do not emphasize it. They do not stress training just to look good at the combine: they train to build real functional strength.

Back to Alekseyev, look at this examination of his training regimen.

What lift do you not see listed in the repertoire of the strongest man in the world? A 2-time gold-medalist? The first man to clean & jerk 500 pounds? No bench press.

So no: the bench press is not a useful metric for measuring strength.

Unanswered is my observation that Konz was strong enough last year to avoid getting thrown to one side after being stood up. He got pushed backward, but most often kept himself between Ryan and the defender. That requires tremendous balance and lower body strength.

Come on man sure I agree that leg strength is vital for a lineman but upper body strength in the arms and hands to sustain blocks is key Konz . Heres

a quote from Howie Long describing Bill Fralic during his rookie year a guy who could press 400 even in his later years with bad tendinites in his elbow.

"He's a tremendous run-blocker, maybe the best I've played against," Long told the Atlanta Constitution. "I never thought I'd see a guy who was as strong as I was. He's got great legs, and I think that's the key to being a great offensive lineman. And does he have great hands! If he gets them on you, it's all over."

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Come on man sure I agree that leg strength is vital for a lineman but upper body strength in the arms and hands to sustain blocks is key Konz . Heres

a quote from Howie Long describing Bill Fralic during his rookie year a guy who could press 400 even in his later years with bad tendinites in his elbow.

"He's a tremendous run-blocker, maybe the best I've played against," Long told the Atlanta Constitution. "I never thought I'd see a guy who was as strong as I was. He's got great legs, and I think that's the key to being a great offensive lineman. And does he have great hands! If he gets them on you, it's all over."

He talks about leg strength and hand strength. The bench does nothing for either.

Just like the 40 does not truly measure "football speed", the bench does not measure "football strength".

Fralic had something even more important than that: flawless technique. That is what Konz needs.

My defending Konz' strength does not mean I think he's good to go. But you need to focus on the the real problem is: his tendency to inexplicably abandon good technique and a proper stance.

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I think that Konz is going to be fine. For those of us old enough, try to remember how bad Todd McClure was. It took the Mud Duck a few seasons to develop into a good blocker. I think that Konz is already ahead of McClure's schedule.

Konz's problem is strictly an inconsistency with technique. He played well as a RG because he did not have to worry about the line calls and he started from a three-point stance. Now, Konz has to make the line calls, concentrate on not tipping the D with changing grips on the ball and finally, he has to learn to position himself after safely snapping the ball. All those things are taking him time.

Konz will be a solid, if not very good center. Give him time.

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And that would be me.

Just to be clear, "butt-muncher" was a joke in response to you saying to resume the name-calling.

Show me a blocking stance that would utilize the motions of the bench press. The bench press isolates upper body muscles. Lower body strength is vastly more important than arm/chest strength in offensive line play.

Like I said, I never benched at all. Not at all. I deadlifted and did the clean & jerk. Lifts that required total body strength. I grew up idolizing Vasily Alekseyev

imago01583463m.jpg

(my dad HATED my rooting for a godless commie over Americans), and got a weight bench for my 11th birthday so I could be just like him.

I already linked you an article about Wisconsin linemen typically performing poorly at the bench press, because they do not emphasize it. They do not stress training just to look good at the combine: they train to build real functional strength.

Back to Alekseyev, look at this examination of his training regimen.

What lift do you not see listed in the repertoire of the strongest man in the world? A 2-time gold-medalist? The first man to clean & jerk 500 pounds? No bench press.

So no: the bench press is not a useful metric for measuring strength.

Unanswered is my observation that Konz was strong enough last year to avoid getting thrown to one side after being stood up. He got pushed backward, but most often kept himself between Ryan and the defender. That requires tremendous balance and lower body strength.

Hehe OK partner I concede your points here, and I really was just trying to have some fun with ya after our heated exchange the other night, I applaud you for responding to my bait in good faith as well. I also knew the butt muncher comment was in fun, and I actually got a laugh outta that one, and am still chuckling at it. I gave Konz way more crap than he deserved in my original post mostly out of my own pure frustration with our entire situation, so I deserved some heat for that.

Finally, I just wanna say I appreciated the thought, and supporting evidence you put into your counter debate. I really do come on here for football knowledge, and you were good enough to lend yours: thank you for that.

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To be fair, our defensive system isn't really an "inside out" type of scheme.

We really should have transitioned to a 3-4-heavy set two years ago. We'd need a fat guy anchor but we would have been able to replicate our "success" while making the transition, IMO.

since when has drafting positions that would make us successful part of our strategy? Have a crap OL and no pass rush? Well son, the obvious answer is to sell the farm for CB.

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He talks about leg strength and hand strength. The bench does nothing for either.

Just like the 40 does not truly measure "football speed", the bench does not measure "football strength".

Fralic had something even more important than that: flawless technique. That is what Konz needs.

My defending Konz' strength does not mean I think he's good to go. But you need to focus on the the real problem is: his tendency to inexplicably abandon good technique and a proper stance.

Not being sarcastic here at all, but I always thought hand punch and holding up against swim moves etc was an important part of OL play, it's hard for me to imagine that bench has nothing to do with that. moreover, again you will probably rebuke me, but OL when they get tired seem to start relying on their arms more...I dont disagree leg strength and endurance isnt more important but with all the hand fighting and with some of the techniques DE's in particular use, seems to me chest and shoulder strength would be pretty important.

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