Jump to content

Tips For A New College Student?


Recommended Posts

college is definitely a social experience. They don't have dorm rooms and force freshmen to live on campus for nothing. Have to be a balance

They force freshmen to live on campus in order to make money off of them. It's the same reason they force freshmen to have meal plans. It's profit for the university.

The purpose of college is not to get a social experience. It is to gain academic achievement and become educated. That there is a social experience is fine, but it is not the ultimate purpose.

I agree with your other post, btw, that there is balance that is needed. Time management is a good skill to learn and college can give experience with that. But all things are secondary to the classroom. That's why athletics and clubs and so forth are called "extra-curricular" activities...they are extra or in addition to, not part of, the academics.

The key is priorities. We're not telling this guy to live like a monk. We're simply making the point that academics come first and everything else second. Too many students prioritize the extra curricular and "fun" stuff above their classes. Unfortunately, a lot of them are able to do that and still graduate, but they're not learning the skills necessary for a job.

Also, the old "it's not what you know but who you know" isn't very applicable these days. Employers are looking for people with skills and experience, not golfing buddies. Networking can open some doors for interviews, but if you can't do the job then friendships aren't going to keep you employed.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 72
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

They force freshmen to live on campus in order to make money off of them. It's the same reason they force freshmen to have meal plans. It's profit for the university.

The purpose of college is not to get a social experience. It is to gain academic achievement and become educated. That there is a social experience is fine, but it is not the ultimate purpose.

I agree with your other post, btw, that there is balance that is needed. Time management is a good skill to learn and college can give experience with that. But all things are secondary to the classroom. That's why athletics and clubs and so forth are called "extra-curricular" activities...they are extra or in addition to, not part of, the academics.

The key is priorities. We're not telling this guy to live like a monk. We're simply making the point that academics come first and everything else second. Too many students prioritize the extra curricular and "fun" stuff above their classes. Unfortunately, a lot of them are able to do that and still graduate, but they're not learning the skills necessary for a job.

Also, the old "it's not what you know but who you know" isn't very applicable these days. Employers are looking for people with skills and experience, not golfing buddies. Networking can open some doors for interviews, but if you can't do the job then friendships aren't going to keep you employed.

academics does come first. Have to understand the concepts of what your major is to do the job. Everything else is second. But college is a social experience. You really can't even argue that. You go to college to learn. And you don't just learn in the classroom. You learn things about yourself by interacting with others. That's why a lot of professors factor in class participation in your final grade. That's why they make you pair up for projects with people. Learning goes beyond the classroom.
Link to post
Share on other sites

They force freshmen to live on campus in order to make money off of them. It's the same reason they force freshmen to have meal plans. It's profit for the university.

The purpose of college is not to get a social experience. It is to gain academic achievement and become educated. That there is a social experience is fine, but it is not the ultimate purpose.

I agree with your other post, btw, that there is balance that is needed. Time management is a good skill to learn and college can give experience with that. But all things are secondary to the classroom. That's why athletics and clubs and so forth are called "extra-curricular" activities...they are extra or in addition to, not part of, the academics.

The key is priorities. We're not telling this guy to live like a monk. We're simply making the point that academics come first and everything else second. Too many students prioritize the extra curricular and "fun" stuff above their classes. Unfortunately, a lot of them are able to do that and still graduate, but they're not learning the skills necessary for a job.

Also, the old "it's not what you know but who you know" isn't very applicable these days. Employers are looking for people with skills and experience, not golfing buddies. Networking can open some doors for interviews, but if you can't do the job then friendships aren't going to keep you employed.

I never lived on campus, even as a freshman. In retrospect I wish that I would have for the first year, but I had no problem making friends. Living on campus was expensive. It wasn't as much as an apartment, but it wasn't too far off.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Greek life is full of douchebags and all the other parties are in small as dorm rooms that suck.

The parties suck, the hangovers suck, just go to class do you work, get a job if needed, make some friends and enjoy your downtime.

The college experience is vastly overrated at smaller colleges.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Greek life is full of douchebags and all the other parties are in small as dorm rooms that suck.

The parties suck, the hangovers suck, just go to class do you work, get a job if needed, make some friends and enjoy your downtime.

The college experience is vastly overrated at smaller colleges.

I had a large time at Auburn.

IF you can make it happen, buy your text books online and not from the college book store. At the end of the semester, sell them online, not to the college book store. Save yourself THOUSANDS over 4 years.

I didn't start doing this until law school unfortunately. I made enough from selling my books from the previous semester to cover the books for the next semester once or twice.

Link to post
Share on other sites

academics does come first. Have to understand the concepts of what your major is to do the job. Everything else is second. But college is a social experience. You really can't even argue that. You go to college to learn. And you don't just learn in the classroom. You learn things about yourself by interacting with others. That's why a lot of professors factor in class participation in your final grade. That's why they make you pair up for projects with people. Learning goes beyond the classroom.

You really have no idea what I do for a living, do you?

Link to post
Share on other sites

no but if you are a professor than no wonder you feel the way you do. My girlfriend mom is a professor and I get lectured all the time cause her youngest son started college last year and I told him the samething.

I wasn't disagreeing with you so much as pointing out that you're lecturing me about what college professors do in the classroom. The purpose of college is not a social experience. That might be a nice side benefit, but it's not the core purpose. We seem to agree that academics comes first. I recognize the value of extra-curricular activities. The problem is that I see way too many students across the country putting the extra stuff first and the academics second. Unfortunately, the administration at large universities encourage this by emphasizing the "amenities arms race" - climbing walls, campus beautification, etc. - and creating incentives for students to de-prioritize their studies.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Treat school like its your job. Spend a solid eight hours a day focused on school work. This means go to class and study. When you study, find a good rhythm. I do a 15 min start up then a 15 minute break. After that, its 45 minutes of study and 5-15 minutes breaks. When you have put in you eight hours, clock out. Do something fun. Get up the next day and do it again. Take the weekends off if you are on schedule. The trick is to be productive while you are studying. I dont study in groups because I like to socialize too much. Im better on my own usually. A study group is good if it is short and organized. If you are like me, just study on your own and socialize when you are 'off the clock.'

Do all of you reading and any work that you can early in the semester. Get plenty of rest and exercise. A tired mind with an out of shape body = an inefficient mind.

When you are 'off the clock', remember this: This is the most easy access you will ever have to hot young college girls. Dont waste it.

Edited by Flip Flop
Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are lucky enough to have all expenses paid via scholarship, parents, money already saved, etc try to remember:

This is the only time in your life that you will have the privileges of an adult, but the responsibilities of a child. You should savor every moment because 25 years from now you'll be saying "I can't believe its been 25 years", and "man those college years were the best."

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wasn't disagreeing with you so much as pointing out that you're lecturing me about what college professors do in the classroom. The purpose of college is not a social experience. That might be a nice side benefit, but it's not the core purpose. We seem to agree that academics comes first. I recognize the value of extra-curricular activities. The problem is that I see way too many students across the country putting the extra stuff first and the academics second. Unfortunately, the administration at large universities encourage this by emphasizing the "amenities arms race" - climbing walls, campus beautification, etc. - and creating incentives for students to de-prioritize their studies.

I wasn't trying to lecture you. I was just disagreeing with the social experience that's all
Link to post
Share on other sites

Load up on condoms

This.

You gonna meet young females of every nationality (Latino, Asian, Middle Eastern, etc.). Don't turn down booty from any of them. But beware cuz there are still many young females who go to college for the sole purpose of findin' a husband. You don't want to graduate with a diploma in one hand and a wedding ring on the other.

LOL! Those guys obviously do not know about SPSU, it's an engineering college. They probably share the same saying as UGA on their athletics and Ga Tech on their coeds, "How bout them dogs." SPSU is not a party school, their applicants have some of the highest SAT/ACT scores in GA. Ratio of M to F students is very lopsided. Great school though.

IF you can make it happen, buy your text books online and not from the college book store. At the end of the semester, sell them online, not to the college book store. Save yourself THOUSANDS over 4 years.

This is right as far as avoiding the campus book store, but rent your texts online its even cheaper.

Link to post
Share on other sites

LOL! Those guys obviously do not know about SPSU, it's an engineering college. They probably share the same saying as UGA on their athletics and Ga Tech on their coeds, "How bout them dogs." SPSU is not a party school, their applicants have some of the highest SAT/ACT scores in GA. Ratio of M to F students is very lopsided. Great school though.

This is right as far as avoiding the campus book store, but rent your texts online its even cheaper.

Don't rent, it's a scam, they'll look for anything wrong with the book and then charge you full price for it. Buy used texts and then resale them

Link to post
Share on other sites

Attend class, that's over half the battle. Make sure your professors know who you are as well that way they'll be more inclined to give you the benefit if there is ever a problem. Plan out study time during the weeks you don't have exams, it's pretty easy to go a week here or there without having to do anything other than attend class so studying will keep the material fresh.

Don't listen to these people telling you to avoid greek life, there are plenty of great people in fraternities/sororities that balance out some of the douchier people. There are douches that aren't greek as well. At least attending some of the rush week events will give you a chance to meet people even if you don't join. There are also service based organizations you can join that will help you to meet new people.

Take advantage of your schools libraries and computer labs to get work done, it can be easier to stay focused when you're out of your dorm room or apartment away from distractions.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a very useful website to help you decide which professors to take:

http://www.ratemyprofessors.com/

I wish they had a website like that years ago when I was at Georgia State. My experience was that most freshamn classes were taught by part-time graduate assistants. Some of them were good but most of them were beyond terrible.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a very useful website to help you decide which professors to take:

http://www.ratemyprofessors.com/

I wish they had a website like that years ago when I was at Georgia State. My experience was that most freshamn classes were taught by part-time graduate assistants. Some of them were good but most of them were beyond terrible.

Terrible website. Very outdated for most universities/colleges. "Hotness" of the professor is not a quality you should consider when looking at classes to take.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...