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Bush Now More Popular Than Obama


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I dont think the average American even remembers Bush.

ADD/ADHD culture in full effect. Where is my Iphone?

I really don't think you're far off the reality here. Anyway, from a fiscally responsible perspective, they both are\were horrible. I've grown to agree with those who say there's not much difference in the parties. One claims to be Conservative, the other claims to care about the less fortunate. The reality (imo) is they are all addicted to their perception of power and only care about maintaining their own positions in their ivory towers and will whore themselves to whomever or whatever policy position makes that most likely for them.

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In U.S., Bill Clinton at His Most Popular

LOL, nothing sticks to that dude

Solid majorities of whites, independents, and all age groups view him favorably

by Lydia Saad

PRINCETON, NJ -- Two-thirds of Americans -- 66% -- have a favorable opinion of former U.S. President Bill Clinton, tying his record-high favorability rating recorded at the time of his inauguration in January 1993. Clinton nearly returned to this level of popularity at two points in his second term, but has generally seen lower ratings, averaging 56% since 1993.

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Past Presidents always get more and more favorable the longer they're out of office. The article even states that.

Jimmy Carter even has a favorable polling above 60%, if that means anything.

That is EXACTLY what I was getting ready to post . . . except I was going to use the phrase "numb nuts" somewhere in my reply.

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Past Presidents always get more and more favorable the longer they're out of office. The article even states that.

Jimmy Carter even has a favorable polling above 60%, if that means anything.

Is that because he has been out of office long, or history is realizing he wasn't a bad president vs a victim of circumstance?

Edited by shc
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Is that because he has been out of office long, or history is realizing he wasn't a bad president vs a victim of circumstance?

It is just a natural human condition when you look into your past it is always seems better than how it actually was.

"Laurie, I'm 65. Every day the future looks a little bit darker. But the past, ever the grimy parts of it... well, it just keeps on getting brighter all the time."

-Sally Jupiter, Watchmen Chapter II

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My vote goes to Warren G. Harding though.

Warren G. Harding's claim to infamy rests on spectacular ineptitude captured in his own pathetic words: "I am not fit for this office and should never have been here."

A former newspaperman and publisher who won a string of offices in his native Ohio, he was an unrestrained womanizer noted for his affability, good looks, and implacable desire to please. It was good, his father once told him, that he hadn't been born a girl, "because you'd be in the family way all the time. You can't say no."

Harding should have said no when Republican Party bosses in the proverbial smoke-filled room (a phrase that originated with this instance) made him their 11th-hour pick for the highest office. He was so reassuringly vague in his campaign declarations that he was understood to support both the foes and the backers of U.S. entry into the League of Nations, the hottest issue of the day.

Once in the White House, the 29th president busied himself with golf, poker, and his mistress, while appointees and cronies plundered the U.S. government in a variety of creative ways. (His secretary of the interior allowed oilmen, for a modest under-the-table sum, to tap into government oil reserves, including one in Teapot Dome, Wyo.)

"I have no trouble with my enemies," Harding once said, adding that it was his friends who "keep me walking the floor nights." Stress no doubt contributed to his death in office, probably from a stroke.

Almost a decade later, his former attorney general called Harding "a modern Abraham Lincoln whose name and fame will grow with time." That time is still a long way off.

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