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Question For The Golfers On This Forum


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So I've decided to try to learn to play golf. I've never been on a golf course before, but I've watched a few tournaments on TV and I think I understand a lot of the terminology and rules. So do you think it would be good idea for me to take a few lessons from a golf pro or should I just schedule a tee time and just work on my technique myself. I'm not trying to play in competitive tournaments or anything, I just want to learn a new hobby that gives me something to do.

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I would get a few lessons in to learn thecswing technique and then once you feel comfortable move to the drive range and work on it yourself, after a few rounds of doing that id say youd be prepared to play 9 or 18 without looking like a complete novice. You dont wanna go out there and have a hack fest diwn the course

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I would get a few lessons in to learn thecswing technique and then once you feel comfortable move to the drive range and work on it yourself, after a few rounds of doing that id say youd be prepared to play 9 or 18 without looking like a complete novice. You dont wanna go out there and have a hack fest diwn the course

I would recommend this. Golf looks easy on TV, but it's not intuitive. The slightest incorrect movement in your swing will send the ball flying in the wrong direction. Lessons are important to get your swing mechanics down, learn the proper stance and way to address the ball for different shots. After that it's just practice. And don't skimp on practicing putting and chipping. It's fun to just go to the driving range and blast your driver, but the medium to short game is the tough part.

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People who don't take lessons tend to get frustrated and give up. The golf swing only comes natural to 1 out of 1,000,000 people, it needs to be learned.

So, yes. Take a few lessons so you have some sort of idea of how to grip, set up, and aim. The hit at the range 1/2 dozen times before going out on the course.

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Like the others have said. Lessons and range....range and more range before you waste your coin on a course. Also getting professional advice before hand is crucial so you don't develop bad swing habits that are hard to break. Like Mdrake said you must not forget the short game practice. This is where the scoring happens. Only way to get your first birdie is to perfect your putting technique. Nothing worse than hitting a nice approach shot then three putting.

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I haven't played a single round since before law school. I need to pick it back up before I lost it forever. ****'s expensive though.

18542_240551170361_4000564_a.jpg

Sh!t man I thought that was what being a lawyer was all about. Smoking stogies, crackin a few brews and playing golf 2 to 3 times a week! tongue.png

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So I've decided to try to learn to play golf. I've never been on a golf course before, but I've watched a few tournaments on TV and I think I understand a lot of the terminology and rules. So do you think it would be good idea for me to take a few lessons from a golf pro or should I just schedule a tee time and just work on my technique myself. I'm not trying to play in competitive tournaments or anything, I just want to learn a new hobby that gives me something to do.

Take lessons from a golf pro, then go to the range and practice, practice, practice! Will be hard to "unlearn" bad technique and habits once developed if you never knew better! My $.02

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Golf can be one of the most frustrating, yet rewarding experiences. I've been playing casually since middle school(5-10 times a year). Since about high school I've developed a nasty slice that no matter what, I just couldn't fix. The last few times I've been golfing, through trial and error, I'm now drawing my shots. Took about 10 years(granted if I played consistently I probably could have fixed this in a couple of months).

As to your question, like muskokas said, I would at least spend a few afternoons at the driving range to give the instructor something to work with.

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People who don't take lessons tend to get frustrated and give up. The golf swing only comes natural to 1 out of 1,000,000 people, it needs to be learned.

So, yes. Take a few lessons so you have some sort of idea of how to grip, set up, and aim. The hit at the range 1/2 dozen times before going out on the course.

I think the 1:1,000,000 ratio may be a bit of a stretch :lol:

Or maybe I was lucky enough to be in a rare class...and my son too. But it isn't a natural thing for sure.

But to the OP, I think basic lessons would be a good idea. Find a teaching pro that teaches from the hole first...and then back to the full swing tee shot. At the end of the day, golf is about scoring as low as you can...and the more you develop around the green, the lower your scores will be

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I also agree with FFS1970...lots of good golf books out there...

Harvey Penick's Little Red Book is an easy read with a ton of golf knowledge that still holds true today

One of the best books I've read is Bob Rotella's 'Golf Is Not A Game Of Perfect'. Rotella is a sports psychologist...and puts the game in a proper perspective. You will never play a more humbling game than golf. It's best to be prepared...

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You don't need lessons, but at least hit a bunch of bucket of balls on the range before hitting the course. You need to at least make sure you can make contact before you get out there. That's not the place to be finding out that you have a problem with that lol.

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I disagree with everyone telling you to go to the range first.

The full swing should be the last thing you practice.

As far as getting used to making contact consistently...start with chip shots around the green. Then move to pitch shots...then to half and 3 quarter swings...then full. Don't move on to the next until you are consistent with the last stage...

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I disagree with everyone telling you to go to the range first.

The full swing should be the last thing you practice.

As far as getting used to making contact consistently...start with chip shots around the green. Then move to pitch shots...then to half and 3 quarter swings...then full. Don't move on to the next until you are consistent with the last stage...

What you are describing is a range session for an experienced player. As a raw beginner, you need to learn how to get the ball in the air and advance it forward.

This is a new hobby for the OP. Nothing would scare him away faster than forking out for lessons before ever trying the game.

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What you are describing is a range session for an experienced player. As a raw beginner, you need to learn how to get the ball in the air and advance it forward.

This is a new hobby for the OP. Nothing would scare him away faster than forking out for lessons before ever trying the game.

We'll have to agree to disagree...Harvey Penick believed in learning from the hole backwards too...

But sure...nothing wrong wih wacking a few on the range before hand. At the end of the day, it depends on how serious the OP plans to be about golf. If he is serious...then go with the lessons and stay committed.

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We'll have to agree to disagree...Harvey Penick believed in learning from the hole backwards too...

But sure...nothing wrong wih wacking a few on the range before hand. At the end of the day, it depends on how serious the OP plans to be about golf. If he is serious...then go with the lessons and stay committed.

Harvey was a golf instructor his whole life. One of his main thoughts was to focus on nothing but the strike of the ball. That's why it makes sense to let beginners whack away a little before introducing swing techniques or custom fit equipment. In terms of generating interest in the game, nothing does it more than belting the ball. Appreciation for a good chip or putt is something you grow into.

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