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J1772: The Future Of Ev Charging


GEORGIAfan
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The future of automobiles is upon us. Or at least it's getting a lot closer. This week, the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) International announced the first official charging plug standard for North American cars. The brand new plugs may arrive as early as next year, meaning that, someday soon, the new American dream could come with a chicken in every pot and J1772 plug in every garage outlet.

Standardizing the plug itself is a sign of major moves forward for plug-in hybrid and electric automobile technology. And the most appealing part of our new, beloved plug? Charging times could be reduced to a mere 20 minutes, which is incredible compared to today's system, which can easily take up to 8 hours or more. Added bonus: faster charging times mean drivers would be able to travel much farther distances.

But before coming to a decision, the SAE consulted with 190 "global experts" from the automotive, charging equipment, and utilities industries as well as national laboratories. And our champion packs a punch. The relatively sleek frame actually holds both an AC and a DC plug, which is huge because it means that the plug will be compatible with any model of car - however old.

Along with the design, standards for charging levels and safety features were set, so you can even use your new AC/DC charger in the midst of storm without getting... Thunderstruck.

http://gizmodo.com/5953021/this-is-officially-how-youll-be-fueling-your-car-in-the-future?post=53655653

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I believe this is great news. It gives EVs a chance at replacing gas, but the race is not over yet. The biggest problem is still infrastructure( Charge Stations and Grid). I believe charge stations will become more readily available as the cost of EVs decrease, which will move EVs from a niche market to mass market, but I am not sure how we can handle moving all our cars to the grid. Switching from one expensive fuel source to another is not going help, but at least the new source is internal and not from a country filled with people who want to kill us.

If we can create a system build on solar power, wind power, natural gas, hydroelectricity, and nuclear energy, then we have a strong chance of become energy independent. I believe we need to now look at our grid and how we can produce a grid that can handle our driving appetite.

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I can see us getting there eventually. Twenty years on the near side and that seems optimistic. We have significant portions of the country that struggle to keep up with the current demand for electricity. EV's will add to that demand. If this is going to work we will need a strong commitment to growth in electricity production.

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Regarding infrastructure, It's going to take a big investment in the form of tax breaks to big oil in order to make this happen. They're going to have to buy their way into gas stations. Oil companies aren't going to volunteer to put these charging stations in on their own dime so that they can reduce their profit margins.

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They have delivered more cars than Tesla this year.

Tesla is in transition. they stopped selling the Roadster in 2011 and The Model S didnt come out until late in the year.First car was delivered in June. It is not a major feat at this moment.

Fisker also has major problems with their cars. They have already had recalls because of coolant leaking on the batter causing fires. I am surprised they are not bankrupt.

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The problem with that type of system is how many different battery configurations we are going to have. Tesla already has two types( the ones in the Model S/X and the one in the Roadster). How many do you think Toyota or Honda or GM are going to have? Also it seems like a huge hassle to have to switch your battery every time you want to travel long distances, plus is the battery you get new or used?

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You exchange them just like you would a propane cylinder. Not a perfect concept, but a start.

Propane does not really matter since it does not have a life cycle and the tanks do not degrade. Batteries hold less charge basically each time you use them. If we switched to this system, some people would get screwed, because the battery the switched out would be older than the battery they currently had. If I bought a brand new car, I would not want my battery to be switched with someone else's battery which cannot hold 50% charge. I would be pissed, and demand a new battery, plus we would have to have a standardized battery. Do you think Toyota/Honda/Ford/GM are all going to agree on a standard sized battery, and what would that mean for larger cars, which naturally need larger fuel storage, because of their size?

The smart system is finding a way to push faster recharges and pack more juice in each battery. I believe Li-ion might not be the system we use. I still think their is a chance we switch to Zinc-air if we can make them rechargeable.

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