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Nfl Safety: Is American Football Too Violent?


FaIconfansince80
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Some American football fans are worried that the National Football League is too brutal to be enjoyed. Can the sport change course?

Charlie Camosy is a big fan of American football.

"It's a great combination of raw caveman strength and gladiatorial combat and the most complicated chess match you can ever imagine," he says, noting that this time of year - when football returns - is one of his favourites.

But Camosy is also a professor of Christian ethics at Fordham University in New York. And this year, he's feeling more and more conflicted about watching the sport he loves when he knows it can be so dangerous.

"Even though I'm excited for the start of the year, we need to be honest about the fact that football is a violent sport, and many things that people like about it, including me, is the violence. It's not just violence in the abstract, it's people's lives who are tremendously impacted by this." says Camosy.

Football has always been a brutal sport: in the early days of the game, President Theodore Roosevelt threatened to shut the college programme down unless the young men from Harvard, Princeton and Yale stopped dying on the field.

One of the National Football League' s most memorable games was the 1985 match between the Washington Redskins and the New York Giants, when Giants defensive player Lawrence Taylor tackled quarterback Joe Theisman with such force that Theisman's leg snapped in two, bone and blood visible on the field.

"Football and violence is nothing new whatsoever," says Frank Deford, sports commentator for National Public Radio and author of Over Time: My Life As a Sports Writer. In the past, that violence has ebbed and flowed as rule changes sought to limit the damage. "It's gone back to a peak again, and the question is whether you can correct the game," he says.

The current state of professional football means that the violence is more impressive to watch - and has more long-lasting consequences.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-19549703

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lol @ "Most complicated chess match you can ever imagine"

Anyways yes, and it wont go on the way it currently is because the majority of the middle class will not have their kids getting brain damage at the rate nfl players suffer from it. I think the most recent study released showed about a 3x more likely rate of trauma induced dementia(and other damage) in nfl players than a normal person. This makes sense seeing as the brain isnt meant to be shaken and popped in that fashion.

NFL has it pretty easy though since there is already another sport which has laid a blueprint in how to effectively pretty much stop the poor tackling habits which lead to the most significant head injuries. NFL should, like rugby, get rid of these helmets. They dont protect anything, and make the players feel invinceable when they smash their heads into each other. Get rid of the helmets and tackling will improve 100% because guys would know if they tackled with their head, they would lose it much quicker than the 20 years later when their brain damage makes them blow their own brains out.

I suppose one of the most comdeming, in recent times, facts to the NFL was the study of that Bengals wide reciever a few years ago who died after falling off the back of his girls truck. A player who had never in the pro, or collegiate, level experieced a reported concussion of any kind already had significant prolonged brain damage that at his age had to have started at the youth levels. What parent, who isnt in the lower class and completely devoid of any other economic opportunity to raise their economic and social class, would risk that with their kids? What would this guys life been like if he had aged and his brain began its natural progression towards a decline? Barring some medical miracle his quality of life would have been horrible no matter his economic level. Money is no substitute for health! That is why I am so sickened by certain NFL fans who say "So what?! I'd glady take the risk for the money!" without actually knowing the terrible life people with brain damage experience.

This sesquipedelian rant aside I will say that the natural progression, if the nfl is to remain Americas sport, will have to be with the eventual realization that these helmets are the big issue. They will be gone sooner rather than later.

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We had a good thing going until the republicans turned into democrats and the crats turned into communist progressives. I think this is what started rome and greece epic fails. First they make gay okay then get rid of the "games" next they'll start freely nambling boys (yalls progressives fav part) then the "empire" which america never was; fails.

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Yup, football is very violent. Guys that are 6'2, 240lbs, that can run a 4.6 hitting other guys can't be good. At the end of the day no one is forcing them to play. Football isn't going anywhere any time soon. It generates so much money.

Edited by KGrillz
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Yup, football is very violent. Guys that are 6'2, 240lbs, that can run a 4'6 hitting other guys can't be good. At the end of the day no one is forcing them to play. Football isn't going anywhere any time soon. It generates so much money.

I bet it will have a big effect on the game though and not just from a rules standpoint. It hasn't happened yet but I can see youth leagues getting smaller in the near future and ultimately the talent pool will be smaller.

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I bet it will have a big effect on the game though and not just from a rules standpoint. It hasn't happened yet but I can see youth leagues getting smaller in the near future and ultimately the talent pool will be smaller.

I could see that. Instead of parents letting their kids play football they might opt for a more a safer sport like soccer. I just don't see that transition from football to another sport for some time.

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