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Why Do We Still Refer To People As Black Or White?


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I am not actually black anymore than white people are white. Why can't we just drop color all together and try and look beyond skin pigment. Underneath our skin we are all pretty darn similar. Only what we are taught and believe makes us different.

I am tired of hearing about people being called black or white--

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I am not actually black anymore than white people are white. Why can't we just drop color all together and try and look beyond skin pigment. Underneath our skin we are all pretty darn similar. Only what we are taught and believe makes us different.

I am tired of hearing about people being called black or white--

I would be irritated at being called brown. Not all Blacks are African American. Etc. Don't call me negro unless you like want the next man over (probably a White guy) to knock fire out of you. Negro actually means black anyways. Would you prefer I call myself Nigerian American, or even deepr Igbo American (which we do not say at all). I mean why do you care?

Just call me by name, but if you try and describe me I do like being called Black. I just like it.

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I appreciate the sentiment, Nono. I dont think that we should treat people differently as individuals because of the color of their skin. I also dont see a problem with people celebrating the differences of their culture. No one would be offended at being called Italian or Irish. I have heard many a person state with pride "that brings out the Irish in me."

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I have no problem with what you want or believe, it is justs odd that people refer to others by their skin tone--it seems racial. Why not their height or weight or name?

Officer, he was 5'7" 150lbs, black hair, white t-shirt.

Who gets picked up? The darker toned guy or the fair skinned guy? It just makes things more random and would cause more issues than you'd think. No, I'm good with being a 5'10" 189lb Black male.

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I have no problem with what you want or believe, it is justs odd that people refer to others by their skin tone--it seems racial. Why not their height or weight or name?

That's pretty unrealistic.

Picture this: You have two guys of similar height, build, both bald, both with a goatee, both wearing the same suit. Do you really have to avoid describing someone accurately because it "feels racial". It only feels that way if you make it.

Officer, he was 5'7" 150lbs, black hair, white t-shirt.

Who gets picked up? The darker toned guy or the fair skinned guy? It just makes things more random and would cause more issues than you'd think. No, I'm good with being a 5'10" 189lb Black male.

Beat me to it.

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I appreciate the sentiment, Nono. I dont think that we should treat people differently as individuals because of the color of their skin. I also dont see a problem with people celebrating the differences of their culture. No one would be offended at being called Italian or Irish. I have heard many a person state with pride "that brings out the Irish in me."

I've heard, "He's gonna bring out the Black in me." as well. You won't hear me pin point another group's stereotype though. It all boils down to respect and loving in spite of what someone looks like. If we nullify what someone is, then you are not loving in spite of. You are masking what you dislike.

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I'm actually about 2-3% black. My third great grand aunt was black. This is my second great grand uncle: http://en.wikipedia...._Lucien_Lambert

But I am in 100% agreement with Nono's post. It's ok to be proud of your heritage but there's no reason to divide people between racial boundaries

third great grand aunt? if this is a blood relative of yours, then why not refer to her parent (s) who would have a direct lineage to you?

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I'm still a little confused about the family tree (have to check with my grandfather) but I think you're right. She would be my third great grand mother in that case and she is a blood relative. The one in the wikipedia article is my second great grand uncle. I'm descended from his brother.

Interesting man. I remember you telling me something like that before.

That close though, I don't think that's 2-3%. There are Blacks with more caucasion than that in their histories spanning 200+ yrs.

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As a Canadian, one difference I've always noticed between ourselves and Americans is how much importance our southern neighbors put on establishing each other's race. People are people are people. Judge them by their actions, not their genetic markers.

I don't know moose, I don't think anyone has the right to judge another person based on anything.

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Ok define them by their actions, not their race.

Have you ever been south of the Mason-Dixon line? It's going to take some time.

For the record, it isn't exclusive to the south. We have racial problems all over this country. It's sad.

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I'm actually about 2-3% black. My fourth great grand mother was black. This is my second great grand uncle: http://en.wikipedia...._Lucien_Lambert

But I am in 100% agreement with Nono's post. It's ok to be proud of your heritage but there's no reason to divide people between racial boundaries

You could have been accepted to Harvard had you put that on your application.

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100% agreed. The "race" check box should be taken off all job applications, college applications, etc...

Yea take that off, then you have african americans complaining that there is no more affirmative action, native americans complaining they are not being accepted into colleges, asians complaining of not getting jobs because of their names, etc. Every race could complain for different reasons. I don't think that would work at this moment in time.

You can say we should eliminate race, but it will always be there. Unfortunately race is used to categorize and stereotype people either purposely or unintentionally. As long as there is a visually difference between people, our brain will always categorize people a certain way, racist or not.

Here is an excerpt from an interesting article relating to race and the brain.

Just a few short years ago, neuroscientists as well as political consultants would have called that wishful thinking. Scientists believed that the human brain automatically classifies individuals by race, just as we classify them by sex and age. Recent research confirms that the brain evolved specialized circuits that make the latter two classifications. But the idea of a brain module for racial categorization was always problematic. Simply put, back when the human brain was evolving a few million years ago, our ancestors didn't get around much. They therefore had no chance to encounter people who looked different from themselves. "There would be no adaptive advantage to a mental module that automatically took note of someone's race," says Penn's Kurzban. His basketball-jersey experiment and others that have confirmed its results suggest that humans do have brain circuits for classifying people—but according to whether they are likely to be an ally or an enemy. In some societies, skin color can indeed be a true clue to that: in the Jim Crow South, if you had black skin, it would have been quite useful to quickly classify a white-skinned person as someone who might shove you off a sidewalk, or worse. In other societies, however, skin color is no indicator of whether someone is friend or foe, as the recent tribe-on-tribe bloodshed in Kenya shows. It therefore makes more sense for the brain not to get hung up on skin color or other race-based aspects of appearance, but to be flexible and nimble about which signs of group membership—of "like me" and "on my side"—it picks up.

and

Many whites who profess to be race-blind unconsciously associate dark skin with negative traits and ideas (evil, failure, dangerous), and light skin with positive ones (joy, love, peace), shows an assessment called the Implicit Association Test. When white Americans see photos flashed so quickly that they can be detected only subliminally, the amygdala, which signals "Watch out!," is significantly more active in response to black than white faces. If the photos appeared long enough to be processed consciously, however, the amygdala quieted down and the rational, thoughtful prefrontal cortex perked up. You could practically hear the cortex telling the amygdala to pipe down and stop being a racist jerk.

Whole article here:

http://www.thedailyb...ks-at-race.html

Edited by NJDirtyBird7
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