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Does Anyone Still Heel Strike When They Run?


lostone
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I stopped a long time ago... I remember my shins being on fire until I learned to midfoot strike. 10 minutes was all I could do before I had to give my shins a rest... Switched to midfoot and could sustain runs much longer without pain. I am currently trying to relearn how to run using my hip flexors and hamstrings.

Though I am overweight, I never have knee or ankle or back problems like others talk about.

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No. I learned early on to strike midfoot. I'm teaching my girls to do the same. On my last run with my oldest (8), she was complaining of being tired, and I looked over and she was leaning forward and heel striking. I said "no wonder, honey -- you're stopping yourself every time you take a stride!"

I also needed to change to a more neutral shoe early on, for the same reason. Once I got my running form right, I still needed some support, but not nearly as much as when I was a heel striker.

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No. I learned early on to strike midfoot. I'm teaching my girls to do the same. On my last run with my oldest (8), she was complaining of being tired, and I looked over and she was leaning forward and heel striking. I said "no wonder, honey -- you're stopping yourself every time you take a stride!"

I also needed to change to a more neutral shoe early on, for the same reason. Once I got my running form right, I still needed some support, but not nearly as much as when I was a heel striker.

Glad to hear... I am going the minimalist route with shoes. Those thick soles just get in the way of running properly. I will probably invest in some 5 fingers. Will wait about 2 weeks to actually run in them. Currently in some saucony shoes (worn them down so it's closer to "natural running")... Weird thing about minimalist shoes is they cost more than regular shoes, which is BS!

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I'm a flatfoot mick. I run all kinds of wrong. My shins burn like hot fiya after a couple miles.

I had an awesome run book "natural running"... Till my dog took a **** on it... I would suggest changing your run style because it can cause pain from your foot to your neck...

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Is this your dog?

triumph_insult_comic_dog.jpg

Heh, nah...

It was my fault... I feed her some people food and she had the runs and **** on my books and the sleeve of one of my shirts...

She's 4 lbs and if I try to get her to run she looks at me funny.

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I got an elliptical. Running on hard surfaces jacks up your knees.

Only if you run improperly. Nike thought it was a good idea to change how we ran for thousands of years with those super thick heeled shoes. You naturally will try to find firm ground when you run and you exert more on your body trying to find the ground. When you heel strike, you are stopping and starting over and over and over again. This is what is wearing out your knees. I used to have problems till I learned how to properly run and disguarded my thick sole shoes. Edited by lostone
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Only if you run improperly. Nike thought it was a good idea to change how we ran for thousands of years with those super thick heeled shoes. You naturally will try to find firm ground when you run and you exert more on your body trying to find the ground. When you heel strike, you are stopping and starting over and over and over again. This is what is wearing out your knees. I used to have problems till I learned how to properly run and disguarded my thick sole shoes.

By it's very definition, running is a high impact exercise. No matter how you run or what's on your feet, running on hard surfaces will catch up with you over time.

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By it's very definition, running is a high impact exercise. No matter how you run or what's on your feet, running on hard surfaces will catch up with you over time.

Maybe when I am 80 :).

Maybe born to run got me too hype, but I believe anyone can run... We had to run to survive. it can't all of a sudden be "bad" to run of this is how we survived for thousands of years. I don't think evolution happens in 30 or 40 years...

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Maybe when I am 80 smile.png.

Maybe born to run got me too hype, but I believe anyone can run... We had to run to survive. it can't all of a sudden be "bad" to run of this is how we survived for thousands of years. I don't think evolution happens in 30 or 40 years...

There are steps you can take to limit the wear and tear. I run on the beach from time to time. I'd recommend running on grass or some cross country trails. I'm just not a fan of running on asphalt.

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There are steps you can take to limit the wear and tear. I run on the beach from time to time. I'd recommend running on grass or some cross country trails. I'm just not a fan of running on asphalt.

There is a run group I am trying to get back into in my area. Once I get back to being able to run 5 miles, I will rejoin them. We run on asphalt, but I am very aware of my body and try to really use my hip flexors, hamstrings an the natural elasticity of my foot to run.

A key mistake that some people do is try to run with their power muscles ie your quads or calves. This kind of running tires you out. People also swim their arms from side to side, that also wears you down quickly. Back and forth is the way. I also concentrate on properly breathing.. 2 steps breath in two steps breath out. I think a lot when I run, but it's how I keep from wearing myself out.

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Funny. I was in New York this weekend and my stride was videotaped/analyzed. I heal strike. I asked the guy if I should think about changing anything in my stride. He said only if I was freakin crazy.

So I've got THAT going for me.

Do you keep your feet under you?

Heel striking takes its toll because of the force you stop yourself with and restart yourself with over and over again. But hey whatever works for you, just keep running!

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FootStrikePattern.png

Forefoot/midfoot are about the same from what I have read. As long as you keep your feet under you, you are good. It's the heel striking that will mess with you.

I guess I have whats called a forefoot strike. Not sure what the difference is between the two in terms of affect on joints.

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Do you keep your feet under you? Heel striking takes its toll because of the force you stop yourself with and restart yourself with over and over again. But hey whatever works for you, just keep running!

I've been doing three mile runs a couple of times a month this spring. Saturday I did a complete lap from the the upper West side around Central Park South and East, up to the Muslim Brotherood Masque on 113th, and down Riverside Park from Harlem to 67th Street . . . when it was close to 90 degrees. After the first four or five miles, I was sort of touring around and stopping at about every drinking fountain I could find. I bought some new shoes and ran about five miles Sunday morning and felt surprisingly good. This morning I was hitting seven minute miles for three miles and felt terrific.

Usually I keep my feet under me, but sometimes I put them over my head or behind my back, where they are out of the way.

Edited by holymoses
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