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Cern 99% Sure God Particle Exist


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I consider myself to be a reasonably intelligent individual with a very high reading level and an even more impressive vocabulary. That being said, I have now read two different articles on this subject and still haven't figured out what the f*ck we're talking about here.

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I consider myself to be a reasonably intelligent individual with a very high reading level and an even more impressive vocabulary. That being said, I have now read two different articles on this subject and still haven't figured out what the f*ck we're talking about here.

Basically, god is an atom.

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I consider myself to be a reasonably intelligent individual with a very high reading level and an even more impressive vocabulary. That being said, I have now read two different articles on this subject and still haven't figured out what the f*ck we're talking about here.

I don't really understand it either, but from what I've read I think explains part how things like quarks and electrons function.

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Actually, the "God Particle" idea is what people outside of science labeled it. In reality, this is as much about settling an internal scientific debate than anything else. In laymen's terms, it's the theoretical (or proven) particle that gives mass to subatomic particles.

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This

Actually, the "God Particle" idea is what people outside of science labeled it. In reality, this is as much about settling an internal scientific debate than anything else. In laymen's terms, it's the theoretical (or proven) particle that gives mass to subatomic particles.

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I consider myself to be a reasonably intelligent individual with a very high reading level and an even more impressive vocabulary. That being said, I have now read two different articles on this subject and still haven't figured out what the f*ck we're talking about here.

Well, from the Wikipedia page:

"The Higgs boson is a hypothetical elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. It belongs to a class of particles known as bosons, characterized by an integer value of their spin quantum number. The Higgs field is a quantum field that fills all of space, and explains why fundamental particles (or elementary particles) such as quarks and electrons have mass. The Higgs boson is an excitation of the Higgs field above its ground state.

The existence of the Higgs boson is predicted by the Standard Model to explain how spontaneous breaking of electroweak symmetry (the Higgs mechanism) takes place in nature, which in turn explains why other elementary particles have mass.[Note 1] Its discovery would further validate the Standard Model as essentially correct, as it is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model that has not yet been observed in particle physics experiments.[2] The Standard Model completely fixes the properties of the Higgs boson, except for its mass. It is expected to have no spin and no electric or color charge, and it interacts with other particles through weak interaction and Yukawa interactions. Alternative sources of the Higgs mechanism that do not need the Higgs boson are also possible and would be considered if the existence of the Higgs boson were ruled out. They are known as Higgsless models.

Experiments to determine whether the Higgs boson exists are currently being performed using the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and were performed at Fermilab's Tevatron until its closure in late 2011. Mathematical consistency of the Standard Model requires that any mechanism capable of generating the masses of elementary particles become visible at energies above 1.4 TeV;[3] therefore, the LHC (designed to collide two 7-TeV proton beams) is expected to be able to answer the question of whether or not the Higgs boson actually exists.[4] In December 2011, Fabiola Gianotti and Guido Tonelli, who were then spokespersons of the two main experiments at the LHC (ATLAS and CMS) both reported independently that their data hints at a possibility the Higgs may exist with a mass around 125 GeV/c2 (about 133 proton masses, on the order of 10−25 kg). They also reported that the original range under investigation has been narrowed down considerably and that a mass outside approximately 115–130 GeV/c2 is almost ruled out.[5] No conclusive answer yet exists, although it is expected that the LHC will provide sufficient data by the end of 2012 for a definite answer.[1][6][7][8] On 4 July 2012, Fabiola Gianotti and Joseph Incandela, current spokespersons for the ATLAS and CMS experiments, are presenting the latest results on the Higgs from the LHC."

I don't see what's so unclear about it, really.........tongue.png

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In short this is the particle that gives atoms it mass. Without it atoms would fly around the universe at the speed of light and be unable to bind to each other to create all material in the universe. Also without mass you have no gravity.

You just confused me even more.

Why were scientists looking for something they knew already existed? Atoms don't fly around the universe at the speed of light without being able to bind to each other. Did they not already know this? I ******* knew that.

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You just confused me even more.

Why were scientists looking for something they knew already existed? Atoms don't fly around the universe at the speed of light without being able to bind to each other. Did they not already know this? I ******* knew that.

You can't say something is fact if you have never observed it.

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