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In This Thread, Tell Me Some Good Books To Read.


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With the summer, I'm rediscovering my love of getting lost in great books. I'm reading the Song of Ice and Fire books; I'm halfway through "A Storm of Swords" now. Also reading "The Walking Dead" graphic novels; they just got to the prison. I'll eventually get to Anthony Bordain's "Kitchen Confidential". Plus, I'm learning Spanish from a series of college textbooks, children's tales, and other miscellaneous texts.

Yet I need some suggestions to fill up my Ipad with ebooks and my bookshelf with paperbacks/hardbacks after I'm done with these (probably the middle of next month). Suggestions, my good men and women. I'm not talking about cheesy romance crap or some nerd-geek obscure sci-fi nonsense (I've read enough John Barnes novels, thank you). I'm talking about things on par with "The Walking Dead" and "A Song of Ice and Fire"...recent, current books that are great. It can be any genre...I've already gone through all of the Jason Borne books but really liked them, for example. Just so long as they are great stories.

Many thanks ahead of time.

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Great thread idea, I'm almost done with Dance of Dragons so I'm looking for my next book series as well.

My roommate's recently got me addicted to Bernard Cornwell books if you like historical fiction. Particularly the Richard Sharpe series (Napoleonic Wars and the most hardass protagonist this side of Jamie Lanister ) and Uthred series (Cool Vikiking sh^t)

As to the Sharpe series they're is like 20 of them but they're fairly short you can easily knock them out in a week or so.

sharpes-rifles-by-bernard-cornwell.jpg

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The title of this book by best-selling author Bill Bryson might be amended to A Short History of Science. While Bryson does indeed investigate everything from the Big Bang down to the machinations of mitochondrial DNA and all stops in between, alongside everything are the stories of the men and women who have brought this knowledge to light. Primarily, in fact, what we have is a short history of modern science, with most of the science coming from no earlier than the mid-17th century.

In any event Bryson’s Short History is a very enjoyable book, wherein he presents his complex subjects in a manner readable to the lay person without dumbing anything down. Early in the book he states that much of science deals with figures both infinitely large and infinitesimally small, and that his aim is to deliver it to the reader in a digestible way, spelling things out rather than using scientific notation whenever possible, and using analogies rather than bald numbers (Bryson thankfully never uses “football fields” as a unit of measurement, but he does tell you for example that if you wove all the DNA in a single cell out in one continuous thread it would stretch from the Earth to the Moon multiple times).

As Bryson recounts the stories of various scientific discoveries, he manages to include fascinating trivia or entertaining stories about the scientists who made the discoveries, often including amusing coincidences along the way. In describing the original discovery of dinosaur bones and fossils, we’re also told the etymology of the vine wisteria, and the origin of the tongue-twister “She sells seashells by the sea shore.” In the chapter on water, we learn that the surface of the Pacific Ocean is 1.5 feet higher on its western shore, due to the centrifugal force of the Earth’s rotation — for some reason this factoid thrills me to the point of near queasiness. It is by means such as these (in addition to his sense of humor and overall skill as a writer) that Bryson can keep your interest in sometimes dry or hard to fathom concepts for nearly 500 pages.

A Short History is a recommended read for anyone with even a casual interest in…well, anything. Read it to learn about cavemen, bacteria, plate tectonics, quantum gobbledygook, and how Isaac Newton once stuck a needle in his eye “just to see what would happen.” And don’t be frightened off by the multiple chapters about how everything from microbes to asteroids to water to earthquakes are definitely going to kill you, because it’s nothing short of a statistical anomaly that you made it this far in the first place, so just relax and enjoy yourself. SCIENCE!

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Great thread idea, I'm almost done with Dance of Dragons so I'm looking for my next book series as well.

My roommate's recently got me addicted to Bernard Cornwell books if you like historical fiction. Particularly the Richard Sharpe series (Napoleonic Wars and the most hardass protagonist this side of Jamie Lanister ) and Uthred series (Cool Vikiking sh^t)

As to the Sharpe series they're is like 20 of them but they're fairly short you can easily knock them out in a week or so.

sharpes-rifles-by-bernard-cornwell.jpg

Thank you for getting what this thread is about.

If you're at all into "The Walking Dead" then I highly suggest "World War Z". It's easily one of the best novels that I've read and, like "The Walking Dead", it doesn't strike me as a traditional gore-stuffed gratuitous zombie type novel. I'll definitely look into your recommendations.

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short-history-of-nearly-everything-cover.jpg

The title of this book by best-selling author Bill Bryson might be amended to A Short History of Science. While Bryson does indeed investigate everything from the Big Bang down to the machinations of mitochondrial DNA and all stops in between, alongside everything are the stories of the men and women who have brought this knowledge to light. Primarily, in fact, what we have is a short history of modern science, with most of the science coming from no earlier than the mid-17th century.

In any event Bryson’s Short History is a very enjoyable book, wherein he presents his complex subjects in a manner readable to the lay person without dumbing anything down. Early in the book he states that much of science deals with figures both infinitely large and infinitesimally small, and that his aim is to deliver it to the reader in a digestible way, spelling things out rather than using scientific notation whenever possible, and using analogies rather than bald numbers (Bryson thankfully never uses “football fields” as a unit of measurement, but he does tell you for example that if you wove all the DNA in a single cell out in one continuous thread it would stretch from the Earth to the Moon multiple times).

As Bryson recounts the stories of various scientific discoveries, he manages to include fascinating trivia or entertaining stories about the scientists who made the discoveries, often including amusing coincidences along the way. In describing the original discovery of dinosaur bones and fossils, we’re also told the etymology of the vine wisteria, and the origin of the tongue-twister “She sells seashells by the sea shore.” In the chapter on water, we learn that the surface of the Pacific Ocean is 1.5 feet higher on its western shore, due to the centrifugal force of the Earth’s rotation — for some reason this factoid thrills me to the point of near queasiness. It is by means such as these (in addition to his sense of humor and overall skill as a writer) that Bryson can keep your interest in sometimes dry or hard to fathom concepts for nearly 500 pages.

A Short History is a recommended read for anyone with even a casual interest in…well, anything. Read it to learn about cavemen, bacteria, plate tectonics, quantum gobbledygook, and how Isaac Newton once stuck a needle in his eye “just to see what would happen.” And don’t be frightened off by the multiple chapters about how everything from microbes to asteroids to water to earthquakes are definitely going to kill you, because it’s nothing short of a statistical anomaly that you made it this far in the first place, so just relax and enjoy yourself. SCIENCE!

Glad I read that summary... I might pick up the book this weekend.

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(Was having connection problems so had to delete previous post)

All of Stephen King's "The Dark Tower" books. I love/hate Stephen King, but I love/really love "The Dark Tower".

Dark Tower and The Mist are on my to-do list

Reading Stephen King makes me nervous never can tell when someone's going to randomly start masturbating or something.

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"The Language of God" by Francis Collins, if you want to learn something (it's about DNA and how biology and astrophysics demonstrates evidence of God, but it's a good academic exercise in any event).

200px-Language_of_god_francis_collins.jpg

.....or.......

I'm going with the pre-edit Slash's autobiography, which sounds way more interesting to me. I just got the free sample through Amazon and might end up ordering the iBook or Kindle version if I like it.

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I'm going with the pre-edit Slash's autobiography, which sounds way more interesting to me. I just got the free sample through Amazon and might end up ordering the iBook or Kindle version if I like it.

You'll learn more about chemistry than biology or astrophysics with that one.

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Btw, I'll add my own...I just read the Steve Jobs biography and it caused me to rethink and re-conceptualize virtually every part of my career. I am radically changing my courses and even redesigning my syllabi to reflect an integrated, simplified, and more focused philosophy that stems from Jobs' ideas about Apple and its devices. If you have any interest in Apple or Steve Jobs as a person, you should read the most recent biography of him.

According to the biography, he was a whiny, bratty, emotional, sociopathic a**hole genius. He doesn't come across as a very good human being. He comes across as a genius who did great things but at great costs to the people who cared for him.
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Also, this is one of the best book's I've ever read. If you're interest in Freud, Jung, Psychoanalysis, the idea of wanting to **** your mother, or historical fiction, this is for you.

Seriously, I finished it in 3 days. It's that good. But I'm also fascinated by Freud. As much as modern society poo-poo's on him, I think he got alot of **** right.

1671-large.jpg

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You'll learn more about chemistry than biology or astrophysics with that one.

I have no doubt. Slash seems like a master of chemistry, if you ask me. Only a master of chemistry could keep his hair from bursting into a flaming ball of fire with all of those heavily dosed hair-sprayed curls sitting next to a smoldering cigarette.

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Also, this is one of the best book's I've ever read. If you're interest in Freud, Jung, Psychoanalysis, the idea of wanting to **** your mother, or historical fiction, this is for you.

Seriously, I finished it in 3 days. It's that good. But I'm also fascinated by Freud. As much as modern society poo-poo's on him, I think he got alot of **** right.

Um, what book are you talking about? Also, I've read Jung's collected works and am trained by a certified Jungian psychologist in dream analysis. Seriously, that last part is not a joke nor a boast.

I happen to think that Jung went too far into the religious with his psychoanalysis theories, but that he was far and away more insightful than Freud. I also think that what Myers-Briggs and Keirsey did to Jung was analogous to what Ned Stark did when he created Jon Snow. But that's just me.

Jung's insight into the even-numbered nature of artistic expression (multiples of two's and four's, for instance) still fascinates me today. I see it almost everywhere, including the rounded squares that fascinated Steve Jobs (as per my previous post).

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Along the lines of Graphic Novels if your looking for some more Song of Ice and Fire literature you can do alot worse than the Hedge Knight Series. It gives alot of background and depth to the History of Westeroes and the Targaryens in particular.

Hedge%2BKnight.jpg

I already own PDF versions of the Novellas on my computer but I'm going to get these as soon as the price goes down. Not paying that much for a glorified comic book.

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