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Rambler

The Food, Recipe, And Restaurant Thread.

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Guest Deisel

I LOVE boston butts. I made 2 8 pounders last weekend as well as a 7.7 pound brisket flat and 5 racks of baby backs, 2 gallons of my brunswick stew, 1 gallon of scratch made baked beans, 2 giant trays of homemade mac'n cheese and 64 ABTs (Atomic Buffalo Turds) for a family reunion. Yet after ALL of that BBQ my wife still wanted me to smoke a flat this weekend. She now prefers brisket over pulled pork, I still love pulled pork over brisket but it's close!

How are you cooking your brisket?

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How are you cooking your brisket?

On one of my kegs. To answer in more detail : I apply my brisket rub, cook it indirectly using a diffuser and smoke it at 225-235 degrees until it reaches an internal temp of 197 degrees. This particular brisket took about 14 hours. When done, I wrap it in foil and let it rest in a towel lined cooler for at least an hour. Then slice against the grain and life is good!

kegs01.jpg

Edited by Regular Guy

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Guest Deisel

On one of my kegs. To answer in more detail : I apply my brisket rub, cook it indirectly using a diffuser and smoke it at 225-235 degrees until it reaches an internal temp of 197 degrees. This particular brisket took about 14 hours. When done, I wrap it in foil and let it rest in a towel lined cooler for at least an hour. Then slice against the grain and life is good!

kegs01.jpg

That sounds fantastic. I don't have a smoker, egg, just a gas grill and Weber. Any suggestions on that other then slow cooking like I do with my ribs?

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That sounds fantastic. I don't have a smoker, egg, just a gas grill and Weber. Any suggestions on that other then slow cooking like I do with my ribs?

You can do a brisket on a Weber. You just have to go with what's called a "Flat" vs. a "Whole Packer". A Flat is what I cooked above, a Packer is the Flat AND a Point in one piece of meat. The point is what is used to make Burnt Ends (awesomeness btw).

To do a flat on a Weber, you need to set up your grill for 2 zone cooking meaning that one side will have coals, the other will only have a drip pan lined with foil. You want to use lump charcoal (you will need A LOT as you will have to add more as it cooks). Put your lump in a pile and use a Weber starter cube to light the very top of the pile, once the starter cube has burned out, put some hickory or apple or whatever smoking agent you want on top of the lit lump and around it so as the fire burns from the center outwards it will ignite the wood and keep your smoke going. Once you got the smoke going, put your grate on (hopefully a split grate so you can add more lump later) and then your flat on the side with the drip pan. Close the lid and let'er roll. You want the temp to be anywhere from 225-275 and KEEP it there. It's tough to do on a regular grill but can be done. The wonderful thing about Kamado style cookers (Big Green Egg, Big Steel Keg/Broil King Keg, Primo. etc.) is that they retain a ton of moisture because they cook through convection and since they are insulated, they use very little fuel. I can cook for about 24 hours using roughly 4 pounds or less (half a bag of lump charcoal). My kegs are THE most thermally efficient Kamados made. They are 2.1 times more thermally efficient than a Big Green Egg. Since it is steel vs ceramics, they use oven grade insulation between the walls. You can hug it at 500 degrees and not get burned. Try that with a Weber! All Kamado grills can get hotter than **** too! You can get them over 800 degrees! Great for making pizzas and putting a killer sear on a steak. With that said, I mostly do low and slows on my kegs. It will stay at 225-235 degrees all night while I sleep! No need to add fuel AT ALL! I used to use an offset smoker and would spend a fortune in lump smoking just one boston butt and it still would not break down the collagen and fat 100%.

One VERY IMPORTANT thing to remember is that you will be cooking to internal temperature NOT TIME. You want to pull that brisket off of the grill when it reaches an internal temp of at LEAST 195. When it's done, double wrap it in foil and put it in a towel lined beer cooler (towel on bottom, then meat in foil covered with another towel) for AT LEAST an hour before slicing

More advice : Get yourself a good thermometer that will monitor your "pit" and your food temp, makes things a lot easier. Google Maverick et-732. It's worth it! Also a good instant read thermometer like a Thermapen is a great tool to have indoors and out.

I will close by saying this, some folks LOVE their offset smokers and that's fine. I used to use a $130.00 Brinkmann side smoker from Wally World until it got too hot and melted siding on my house :) I decided to spend the dough on my current setup and have not regretted it one iota! Some say that having a Kamado like a Big Green Egg is bourgeois (quote from Andrews!!) and that may be true for some but I bought mine because I like to cook food that turns out like I want it to, and now it DOES! It's NOT a status symbol. If it were, I would have it as an ornament in my front yard, not hidden under my deck. I can tell you there are FAR more appealing things to spend hard earned money on just for the sake of having it, than a grill.

Edited by Regular Guy

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Guest Deisel

You can do a brisket on a Weber. You just have to go with what's called a "Flat" vs. a "Whole Packer". A Flat is what I cooked above, a Packer is the Flat AND a Point in one piece of meat. The point is what is used to make Burnt Ends (awesomeness btw).

To do a flat on a Weber, you need to set up your grill for 2 zone cooking meaning that one side will have coals, the other will only have a drip pan lined with foil. You want to use lump charcoal (you will need A LOT as you will have to add more as it cooks). Put your lump in a pile and use a Weber starter cube to light the very top of the pile, once the starter cube has burned out, put some hickory or apple or whatever smoking agent you want on top of the lit lump and around it so as the fire burns from the center outwards it will ignite the wood and keep your smoke going. Once you got the smoke going, put your grate on (hopefully a split grate so you can add more lump later) and then your flat on the side with the drip pan. Close the lid and let'er roll. You want the temp to be anywhere from 225-275 and KEEP it there. It's tough to do on a regular grill but can be done. The wonderful thing about Kamado style cookers (Big Green Egg, Big Steel Keg/Broil King Keg, Primo. etc.) is that they retain a ton of moisture because they cook through convection and since they are insulated, they use very little fuel. I can cook for about 24 hours using roughly 4 pounds or less (half a bag of lump charcoal). My kegs are THE most thermally efficient Kamados made. They are 2.1 times more thermally efficient than a Big Green Egg. Since it is steel vs ceramics, they use oven grade insulation between the walls. You can hug it at 500 degrees and not get burned. Try that with a Weber! All Kamado grills can get hotter than **** too! You can get them over 800 degrees! Great for making pizzas and putting a killer sear on a steak. With that said, I mostly do low and slows on my kegs. It will stay at 225-235 degrees all night while I sleep! No need to add fuel AT ALL! I used to use an offset smoker and would spend a fortune in lump smoking just one boston butt and it still would not break down the collagen and fat 100%.

One VERY IMPORTANT thing to remember is that you will be cooking to internal temperature NOT TIME. You want to pull that brisket off of the grill when it reaches an internal temp of at LEAST 195. When it's done, double wrap it in foil and put it in a towel lined beer cooler (towel on bottom, then meat in foil covered with another towel) for AT LEAST an hour before slicing

More advice : Get yourself a good thermometer that will monitor your "pit" and your food temp, makes things a lot easier. Google Maverick et-732. It's worth it! Also a good instant read thermometer like a Thermapen is a great tool to have indoors and out.

I will close by saying this, some folks LOVE their offset smokers and that's fine. I used to use a $130.00 Brinkmann side smoker from Wally World until it got too hot and melted siding on my house smile.png I decided to spend the dough on my current setup and have not regretted it one iota! Some say that having a Kamado like a Big Green Egg is bourgeois (quote from Andrews!!) and that may be true for some but I bought mine because I like to cook food that turns out like I want it to, and now it DOES! It's NOT a status symbol. If it were, I would have it as an ornament in my front yard, not hidden under my deck. I can tell you there are FAR more appealing things to spend hard earned money on just for the sake of having it, than a grill.

Fantastic info. Many thanks. I will indeed follow your advice and then invite you over for a beer, a falcons game and hopefully 1 heck of a brisket.

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Fantastic info. Many thanks. I will indeed follow your advice and then invite you over for a beer, a falcons game and hopefully 1 heck of a brisket.

Glad I could be of help! I don't claim to be a pitmaster, but I know my way around the outdoor "kitchen" !

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I smoked an 18 pound turkey for Thanksgiving. I brined it for a day, let it hang out in the fridge on a rack for 2 days to dry the skin out so that it would get crispy on the smoker. I rubbed a compound herb butter on and under the skin and then injected it with creole butter. Smoked with apple wood. It was great! I do these every year and always wonder why I wait to only do them at the hollidays, they're too good to not cook more often.

tday2012-1.jpg

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I smoked an 18 pound turkey for Thanksgiving. I brined it for a day, let it hang out in the fridge on a rack for 2 days to dry the skin out so that it would get crispy on the smoker. I rubbed a compound herb butter on and under the skin and then injected it with creole butter. Smoked with apple wood. It was great! I do these every year and always wonder why I wait to only do them at the hollidays, they're too good to not cook more often.

tday2012-1.jpg

Didnt get close to cooking anything this Thanksgiving because the wife wanted to cook the Turkey in her new roaster. On a side note I envy you guys that have access to all of the apple and peach wood you want, around here its not that plentiful. I have to settle for Maple, Cherry, and Pecan and because of Sandy I will have all of that I need. The storm has caused me to cut down two Silver Maples and a Pecan in my back yard and now I`m overrun with wood. If I was headed down for a Falcon game I would bring you a truckload.

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Didnt get close to cooking anything this Thanksgiving because the wife wanted to cook the Turkey in her new roaster. On a side note I envy you guys that have access to all of the apple and peach wood you want, around here its not that plentiful. I have to settle for Maple, Cherry, and Pecan and because of Sandy I will have all of that I need. The storm has caused me to cut down two Silver Maples and a Pecan in my back yard and now I`m overrun with wood. If I was headed down for a Falcon game I would bring you a truckload.

I would take it! Pecan is great on poultry. I have heard Cherry goes well with just about anything. Maple is great for pork. For the most part, I use hickory and apple on most of my cooks. I use mesquite sparingly as it can impart a bitter taste if you use too much. I haven't used peach wood yet which I guess is odd since Ga is supposed to be the peach state. We actually should be called the peanut state as that's what we export the most of. Of course we could also be the vidalia onion state I guess. At any rate, I would like to try manzanita wood as well. All in due time I suppose.

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I probably cook outside more in the fall than the summer. One of my best cooks this summer was when I cooked a Boston Butt with my favorite pork rub, followed by a delicious Memphis Red Sauce, and then lacquering it with a sweet and somewhat spicy glaze. After pulling the meat I used a Carolina vinegar sauce to top it off. I was afraid I might have created a culinary nightmare but it turned out to be the best pulled pork I have ever had. The key was to use all of the drippings from the pork as well as the sauce and glaze to incorporate back into the meat after it was pulled. The vinegar sauce added some magic. I have screwed up some cooks before by trying crazy crap but this experiment paid off handsomely.

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Digging this thread up again :)

My Wife has been sick for about 5-6 days and didn't feel like going out for dinner or cooking last night so I made dinner for us. That's not out of the ordinary mind you, I just don't normally cook indoors, I am the grilling type I guess you could say. I felt like making some "comfort" food so I made a meatloaf with some 8 cheese mac&cheese, seasoned green beans and parker house rolls. I have to tell you that this hit the spot. Her head is all congested and is throwing her taste off and even still she said it was the best mac&cheese she'd ever eaten. I agree! The meatloaf was killer too. This was one of those meals that's wasn't fancy, just simple, stick to your ribs good.

meatloaf1.jpg

After we ate, I put a 9 pond Boston Butt on the smoker for today. We'll eat some BBQ sammies with some leftover mac I guess. I am sure that if I keep cooking like this she is going to stay sick for a long time LOL.

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I made some really good chicken tacos a few days back. Butterflied 2 chicken breast and then marinated them in a half a cup of olive oil. 1 teaspoon of cumin and 1 teaspoon of paprika. Let them marinate in the fridge for an hour or so. Then squeeze two limes across them and marinate for another 30 minutes. throw on grill for about 4 minutes per side. Take them off and let them cool, then slice into strips. Heat up a tortilla, put down a layer of black beans and then the chicken, queso, and sliced jalapenos. Makes for a very good, fairly easy dinner.

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Digging this thread up again smile.png

My Wife has been sick for about 5-6 days and didn't feel like going out for dinner or cooking last night so I made dinner for us. That's not out of the ordinary mind you, I just don't normally cook indoors, I am the grilling type I guess you could say. I felt like making some "comfort" food so I made a meatloaf with some 8 cheese mac&cheese, seasoned green beans and parker house rolls. I have to tell you that this hit the spot. Her head is all congested and is throwing her taste off and even still she said it was the best mac&cheese she'd ever eaten. I agree! The meatloaf was killer too. This was one of those meals that's wasn't fancy, just simple, stick to your ribs good.

meatloaf1.jpg

After we ate, I put a 9 pond Boston Butt on the smoker for today. We'll eat some BBQ sammies with some leftover mac I guess. I am sure that if I keep cooking like this she is going to stay sick for a long time LOL.

im not a meatloaf fan but I would punch my mama in the mouth for a shot at that mac n cheese lol

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im not a meatloaf fan but I would punch my mama in the mouth for a shot at that mac n cheese lol

We don't ever eat meatloaf around my house. My Wife is not a fan of it really but will eat it, I made it mostly for me but the mac was for both of us! If you've ever eaten meatloaf at Cracker Barrel, that's what I made. Exact replica of it so it turned out nice for meatloaf. That mac cost me a fortune to make but it was worth it!

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We don't ever eat meatloaf around my house. My Wife is not a fan of it really but will eat it, I made it mostly for me but the mac was for both of us! If you've ever eaten meatloaf at Cracker Barrel, that's what I made. Exact replica of it so it turned out nice for meatloaf. That mac cost me a fortune to make but it was worth it!

which types of cheese did you use?

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which types of cheese did you use?

Sharp Cheddar, Gouda, Smoked Gouda, Monterey Jack, White American, Provolone, Fresh Grated Parmesan, Cheddar Cheese Soup. It also has baby swiss cheez-its crumbled with butter as a topping. There are a few other secret things I put in there but that's the cheese list.

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Sharp Cheddar, Gouda, Smoked Gouda, Monterey Jack, White American, Provolone, Fresh Grated Parmesan, Cheddar Cheese Soup. It also has baby swiss cheez-its crumbled with butter as a topping. There are a few other secret things I put in there but that's the cheese list.

secret sauce >>>>>>>

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