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I believe it he had some depression issues for some time. I saw him on a couple of shows and he looked sharp. Definitely didn't look like Romanowski.

Was going to say this. When I lived in San Diego, and he was playing there earlier in his career there was talk about that. Supposedly he had some issues with depression at USC as well. I don't think this is concussion related, at least not completely unless it's pre-NFL concussions.

Very sad though, he was one of my favorite players. I met him a couple of times & he seemed like a really great guy.

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Guest Gritz

It's truly sad....and I echo SiViK's sentiments.....

Like probably virtually everyone else on here I've had some brutally tough things in my life I've had to battle and overcome....Quite frankly I'm being challenged right now with some excruciatingly hard stuff, but when you have a child or children, a partner who loves and has stuck by you through it all, you gotta find a way to get help to get through....

R.I.P. Junior....

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I might can agree on some level about regular life being different, but in no way is it dull in comparison. Especially for those of us blessed enough to have children in our lives. That is the single most special and exciting thing I have ever been a part of or will be. I cannot grasp the thought of living my child forever by my own hands, cannot do it. There is no way. There is something going on there that provides a disconnect somehow. I'm sure he loved his kids, I'm not doubting that. But, there has to be something else that keeps him from being able to understand being away from your kids forever. Actually following through with it is the thing I cannot get, I'm sure he had thoughts of his kids at some point during contemplating ending his own life but apparently lacked whatever it was to make him realize nothing is more important than being a parent and being there for them no matter how tough your life is or seems to be. Not even football, or in this case, the lack there of.

^Well said, but from a clear and pragmatic place. As someone who was unemployed for 18mos you question your value when all you know is no longer. I can't walk a mile in his/others shoes..just able to understand the feelings of hopelessness. He played for 20 years! Walking away was tough. Retired 5 yrs before truly retiring. In any event #sadness.

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wow, hate to hear this - Junior Seau was a beast of a linebacker - hate to hear that his personal life was in turmoil enough to lead him to taking his own life. I always liked him as a player - pray for his children as I know they will miss their dad.

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OMG ... I can't believe this.

I know a lot of people suffer from depression after leaving the NFL due to not having that structure in their lives. I know Morton Anderson has had issues with this as well.

RIP Junior Seau. This would have been the last person I would think would have this type of issue. Very sad day.

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^Well said, but from a clear and pragmatic place. As someone who was unemployed for 18mos you question your value when all you know is no longer. I can't walk a mile in his/others shoes..just able to understand the feelings of hopelessness. He played for 20 years! Walking away was tough. Retired 5 yrs before truly retiring. In any event #sadness.

That is why I feel like I can comment on this a little bit, I have had some rough dark spots in my life and have had those feelings of worthlessness and hopelessness but I don't have time for that and know what my true purpose is. This isn't really why I am in this thread commenting anyway. I just wanted to say that there is no way he was just like " oh well football is done, 9-5 sucks and i'm going to end it all" and if it was really like that I'm saying there is something wrong making him think that and act on it, not the dullness of "regular" life itself.

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I might can agree on some level about regular life being different, but in no way is it dull in comparison. Especially for those of us blessed enough to have children in our lives. That is the single most special and exciting thing I have ever been a part of or will be. I cannot grasp the thought of living my child forever by my own hands, cannot do it. There is no way. There is something going on there that provides a disconnect somehow. I'm sure he loved his kids, I'm not doubting that. But, there has to be something else that keeps him from being able to understand being away from your kids forever. Actually following through with it is the thing I cannot get, I'm sure he had thoughts of his kids at some point during contemplating ending his own life but apparently lacked whatever it was to make him realize nothing is more important than being a parent and being there for them no matter how tough your life is or seems to be. Not even football, or in this case, the lack there of.

SO I can certainly atest to what you are saying as it pertains to my life but I also know that we are not all wired the same way.

I'll give you an example of what I'm talking about. I divorced in 2000 and I had a 5 year old daughter at the time who is now 17. I had moved to Alabama because it was my ex-wifes home.

When I divorced my brother asked me why I didn't move back home. I replied,"I could not imagine being that far away from my daughter". He said to me, "I would have never have looked back". That wouldn't even have entered into his thinking process. He and I were raised by the same parents but we are wired totally different. Some peoples identities are found in their careers, some in their spouses, some in their kids, and some in thier service (churches, charities, organizations, etc.)

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SO I can certainly atest to what you are saying as it pertains to my life but I also know that we are not all wired the same way.

I'll give you an example of what I'm talking about. I divorced in 2000 and I had a 5 year old daughter at the time who is now 17. I had moved to Alabama because it was my ex-wifes home.

When I divorced my brother asked me why I didn't move back home. I replied,"I could not imagine being that far away from my daughter". He said to me, "I would have never have looked back". That wouldn't even have entered into his thinking process. He and I were raised by the same parents but we are wired totally different. Some peoples identities are found in their careers, some in their spouses, some in their kids, and some in thier service (churches, charities, organizations, etc.)

So true. I have lots of friends who are retiring or unemployed. Many of them miss routine and social interaction of their teammates to the point of depression. Others never look back, and are so thankful that they are out of the grind.

I say: find a second career in broadcasting or something, if you are depressed. It is not worth it to kill yourself. How sad. R.I.P.

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SO I can certainly atest to what you are saying as it pertains to my life but I also know that we are not all wired the same way.

I'll give you an example of what I'm talking about. I divorced in 2000 and I had a 5 year old daughter at the time who is now 17. I had moved to Alabama because it was my ex-wifes home.

When I divorced my brother asked me why I didn't move back home. I replied,"I could not imagine being that far away from my daughter". He said to me, "I would have never have looked back". That wouldn't even have entered into his thinking process. He and I were raised by the same parents but we are wired totally different. Some peoples identities are found in their careers, some in their spouses, some in their kids, and some in thier service (churches, charities, organizations, etc.)

That in itself is almost what I speak of....the ability to detach like that. Not sure saying something is wrong with the person that thinks that way is the correct way to put it but I don't know how else to describe it. I personally just cannot understand that thinking and guess that is the reason I see it as "abnormal". So sad that no one in his family saw this coming and he didn't try to reach out for help, or maybe he did and we just don't know.

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That is why I feel like I can comment on this a little bit, I have had some rough dark spots in my life and have had those feelings of worthlessness and hopelessness but I don't have time for that and know what my true purpose is. This isn't really why I am in this thread commenting anyway. I just wanted to say that there is no way he was just like " oh well football is done, 9-5 sucks and i'm going to end it all" and if it was really like that I'm saying there is something wrong making him think that and act on it, not the dullness of "regular" life itself.

That's not what I was saying in my comment. My point was and is, there is a much more difficult transition back to normal life than people want to admit. It happens in sports, soldiers, even bands. You go from having structure, communal purpose, and a group you're completely with...and then you don't. It doesn't make it ok to off yourself. I was just providing more context.

I assume people know enough about depression, and the fact that you're not thinking very well if you're in serious depression (clouds judgement and make it seem like you've felt that way forever, even if you were fine 3 weeks ago). Thought it might be worthwhile to also think about how hard a transition it really is.

No one thinks, oh well 9 to 5 sucks, let me off myself. Just like no one thinks, oh well, lost my job let me off myself. But often suicides come after people lose their jobs. It's not the loss of job. It's the loss of purpose, loss of self worth, sending people into a depression. I don't condone it, because I believe if your situation is giving you problems...no matter how hard it is, change your situation. On the other hand, I don't like to minimize the problems other people go through. And some keep trying to find other things in life that will fill that same level of excitement...when it would be far better to acknowledge things aren't likely to be as "exciting" going forward, but can be very rewarding. That way, instead of chasing something you won't find and being perpetually disappointed, you readjust your sights, and find things that can make you content.

Regardless, sad to see him, and too many football players go before their time.

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