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Why The Julio Trade Made Sense And Still Does Now


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Why the Julio Jones trade made – and still makes – sense

Flowery Branch – Reaction to the Falcons’ leap of 21 slots to grab Julio Jones last April was swift and damning, and the criticism has regained traction as the team approaches the 2012 draft without a first-round pick. Now as then, the argument against the move can be stated this way: “You can’t trade five picks for a wide receiver.”

And here’s where I make like Michael Corleone in “The Godfather” when his older (and dumber) brother Sonny insists you can’t shoot a New York City police captain even if he is in cahoots with the knife-wielding Sollozzo. Patiently Michael lays out the reasons why, just this once, you could. Here’s where I tell you why dealing for Julio Jones was, contrary to popular belief, altogether right and proper.

1. Because the Falcons didn’t want just “a” wide receiver. General manager Thomas Dimitroff coveted either A.J. Green of Georgia, taken by Cincinnati with the fifth overall pick, or Jones of Alabama, plucked by the Falcons one spot later. “Those two wide receivers are the kind that only come along every few years,” Dimitroff said this week, which suggested he doesn’t see one as good in the 2012 draft class. (Asked if he did, he declined to answer.)

The belief in some circles was that Jones is a talent on the order of Arizona’s Larry Fitzgerald, often identified as the NFL’s finest receiver. Of Jones, Dimitroff said pointedly: “He’s without diva-like qualities” — an appraisal that wouldn’t apply to many top-shelf wideouts.

2. Because Jones was as good as advertised. He missed three games because of injury, but caught 54 passes for 949 yards and eight touchdowns. In one half against Indianapolis, Jones made two astonishing plays — a diving end-zone catch between defenders so improbable it was first adjudged incomplete and an 80-yard runaway on a simple slant — that validated the Falcons’ exalted appraisal.

Dimitroff on Jones’ rookie season: “It was very good and encouraging with much upside. If he hadn’t been hurt, he’d have had 1,200 or 1,300 yards.”

3. Because this wasn’t a move just for 2011. Roddy White turned 30 in November. The Falcons saw in Jones a wideout who would first serve as 1A to White before becoming No. 1 himself. If Jones helped win a Super Bowl as rookie, great — but he didn’t come with an expiration date of Feb. 5, 2012.

The Falcons’ offense did improve statistically: From 16th-best in total offense in both 2009 and 2010, it was 10th-best last season. Still, this sleek offense didn’t manage a point in its playoff loss against New York on a day when Jones had seven catches for 64 meager yards. But surely new offensive coordinator Dirk Koetter will feel a need to incorporate Jones more fully.

4. Because not trading for Jones wouldn’t necessarily have yielded a defensive upgrade. Consensus held that the Falcons had to bolster their D in the 2011 draft. Had they kept the 27th overall pick, they wouldn’t have spent it on a defensive end. Said Dimitroff: “All the ones we liked were gone.”

Six defensive ends were taken in the first 24 selections. (Cameron Jordan, who went to New Orleans at No. 24, started 15 games as a rookie but managed only one sack.) With an eye toward defensive ends, the Falcons had sought to move up between the 15th and 20th pick — but possible partner Jacksonville traded up to No. 10 and took a defensive end itself.

Had the Falcons kept the other two 2011 picks they sent to Cleveland — the draft’s 59th and 124th overall — and used them on defenders, there’s a chance neither might have become more than a rotational player. There was never a chance Jones wouldn’t start Game 1 of Year 1.

5. Because the pain of not having a first-round (or a fourth-round) choice in 2012 is eased by knowing Jones is under contract. NFL scouts value the draft pick above all else. Still, Dimitroff balked at a suggestion that in making the Jones trade he’d gone against his nature. “My background is in scouting,” he said. “But I am a GM.”

As such, he looked hard at his roster and made this determination: “We already had [defensive] guys who were better than those we were going to get in the draft. We determined that this was the time, more than any other, to make a bold move.”

Conclusion: The trade for Jones shouldn’t be viewed so much one player for five players but one singular talent over five draft picks — none of which was guaranteed to contribute immediately, three of which wouldn’t fall in the first 50 of their respective drafts. It was a heavy cost, but to secure this particular player it wasn’t outrageous.

Asked if he’d do the Julio Jones deal again, Dimitroff said: “Categorically, yes.” And just for the record, Capt. McCluskey and Sollozzo wound up dead. Michael Corleone shot them.

By Mark Bradley

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The Giants pounded the testosterone out of the Falcons Sunday, with a dominant 24-2 victory that left no doubt about who were the men and who were the boys in this NFC battle.

Atlanta's only points were a safety generated by the defense. That's right, folks: Here in a season when passing records are being shredded like old Enron balance sheets, Matt Ryan and his galaxy of so-called star receivers were shut out, blanked, zip-o-fied.

The entire punch-less offensive (in both senses of the word) effort was an indictment of the team's disastrous decision to mortgage its future to move up the board to grab Julio Jones in the first round of the 2011 draft. General manager Thomas Dimitroff should be forced to walk the pigskin plank for orchestrating this foul-sounding yet predictable disaster.

So the game was not just a win for the Giants. It was also a win for the only force in football since the 1972 Dolphins to go undefeated and untied: the Cold, Hard Football Facts Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law.

If you're new to the Mighty CHFF, this Man Law tells us that wide receivers are nothing more than Shiny Hood Ornaments decorating the engine of NFL teams. They look all nice and flashy and they cause fans to "ooh" and "ahh." But they don't make the engine run any better.

The Cold, Hard Football Fact, proven through all of NFL history, is that the impact of wide receivers is wildly overvalued by fans, analysts and, most damningly, by teams, coaches and executives, like Dimitroff, who should know better ... but don't.

The Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law proved so powerful in the 2010 season that we elevated it from the Shiny Hood Ornament Theory to its present status. It is no longer an idea or a concept. It is an irrefutable state of nature and exists all around us. Call it gravity for the gridiron.

The 2011 Falcons are the latest team to challenge the Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law, then hurt itself plummeting back to Earth in the process.

Atlanta torched badly chasing a Shiny Hood Ornament

The Falcons failed to study the Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law back in the 2011 draft. So they not only drafted wide receiver Jones in the first round, which is almost always a mistake, but also did the unthinkable to make it happen. They mortgaged their future, trading five draft picks to move up the draft board to grab Jones with the No. 6 overall pick. In other words, the Falcons made other parts of the team worse in the belief that a Shiny Hood Ornament would make the entire Atlanta vehicle run better.

We knew it was a bad move the moment it happened, especially for a team that went 13-3 the year before but failed to win a single playoff game because of problems that were exposed so badly by the Packers. In fact, we issued Atlanta a D- in our Sports Illustrated draft grades. So we're not engaging in a little revisionist history. The Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law told us it was an impending disaster the second the deal unfolded.

The mistake on draft day proved to be a mistake all year, as Atlanta took a step back by every meaningful measure.

The Atlanta Falcons' decline

2010 2011 Record 13-3 10-6 Playoff seed No. 1 No. 5 Points scored 414 402 Points allowed 288 350

So here's what the Falcons got for their five draft picks: they won fewer games, scored fewer points, surrendered more points and tumbled from the No. 1 seed to the No. 5 seed -- all because they believed placing a bright Shiny Hood Ornament on the offense would make the team run faster.

Oh, and just for good measure, they have no No. 1 pick in the 2012 draft to help fix the obvious problems, like an offensive line that can't get a push when needed and a defense that fell off badly. Other than that, it was a great decision to mortgage the future to pick up a Shiny Hood Ornament.

The disaster unfolds Sunday in front of Football Nation

The stupidity of the decision came crashing down on the Falcons for all of Football Nation to see on Sunday: the Atlanta passing game was a disaster, the Falcons were shut out, the offensive line was overmatched and its receivers were no-shows. Here's what we said Sunday in our Falcons-Giants grades on SI.com:

"Atlanta's star-studded pass-catching corps of Jones, Roddy White and future Hall of Fame tight end Tony Gonzalez were non-factors, unable to get separation. They combined for 16 ineffective catches for 160 yards. Decent numbers, but zero game-changing plays for such a high-profile trio."

And that statement, in a nutshell, is a very good explanation of why receivers are Shiny Hood Ornaments. They can't make game-changing plays if the QB can't get them the ball. A lot of things have to be working right for Shiny Hood Ornaments to, first, get the ball and, second, do something meaningful with it.

Even the best Shiny Hood Ornaments touch the ball only four or five times a game -- a fact that seems lost on analysts and executives who habitually over-value their impact. (By the way, Gonzalez is another example of the Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law in action. He's the all-time leader in everything by a tight end. What's he got for it? He has 16 catches, 157 yards, two TDs and zero wins in five career playoff games, including a quiet four catches for 44 yards on Sunday.)

So here's what the Falcons got Sunday for those five draft picks in the biggest game of the year:

1. They got an offense that scored zero points against a team that surrendered 400 points during the regular season, the most by any playoff team.

2. They got seven ineffective catches for 64 yards -- just 9.1 YPC -- from Jones, a guy who's supposed to be a once-in-a-lifetime game-changer.

3. They got zero movement from their offensive line in one key short-yardage situation after another -- a nail-spitting animal at right guard would have been a lot more valuable to the Falcons in the biggest game of the year than an over-valued Shiny Hood Ornament.

There was also a certain irony to the fact the Falcons and their Shiny Hood Ornament were overwhelmed by the Giants. New York's leading receiver this year was Victor Cruz, who set a franchise record with 1,536 receiving yards, including a signature record-tying 99-yard touchdown reception in a must-win game over the Jets on Christmas Eve.

The record-setting Cruz was an undrafted free agent out of UMass. Yes, he's a Shiny Hood Ornament, too. He still only touches the ball four or five times per game. But the Giants found him with their morning coffee one day in 2010. They didn't make their team worse in the effort to land him. He's productive because he's paired with a great quarterback.

QBs make WRS; WRs do not make QBs

All of which brings us to the elephant in the room in Atlanta's 2011 post-mortem of pigskin: Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan simply can't get it done.

He's consistently had trouble getting the ball downfield throughout his career, and has now played poorly in three straight playoff games. In fact, Ryan has statistically stagnated somewhere well below mediocre in his three postseason games, all losses: 72.8 rating in the 2008 playoffs; 69.0 rating in the 2010 playoffs; and 71.1 rating here in the 2011 playoffs.

t doesn't matter how many so-called "weapons" you put around a quarterback. The Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law tells us that quarterbacks make wide receivers, not the other way around. And right now we have four years of evidence saying that Ryan is not good enough to make his receivers better.

In either case, executives and coaches who are unaware of the Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law are like physicists are unaware of Newton's Laws of Motion. They have no business being in the field and need to find another line of work.

Read more: http://sportsillustr...l#ixzz1snSG9cO6

Edited by Twifws
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The Giants pounded the testosterone out of the Falcons Sunday, with a dominant 24-2 victory that left no doubt about who were the men and who were the boys in this NFC battle.

Atlanta's only points were a safety generated by the defense. That's right, folks: Here in a season when passing records are being shredded like old Enron balance sheets, Matt Ryan and his galaxy of so-called star receivers were shut out, blanked, zip-o-fied.

The entire punch-less offensive (in both senses of the word) effort was an indictment of the team's disastrous decision to mortgage its future to move up the board to grab Julio Jones in the first round of the 2011 draft. General manager Thomas Dimitroff should be forced to walk the pigskin plank for orchestrating this foul-sounding yet predictable disaster.

So the game was not just a win for the Giants. It was also a win for the only force in football since the 1972 Dolphins to go undefeated and untied: the Cold, Hard Football Facts Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law.

If you're new to the Mighty CHFF, this Man Law tells us that wide receivers are nothing more than Shiny Hood Ornaments decorating the engine of NFL teams. They look all nice and flashy and they cause fans to "ooh" and "ahh." But they don't make the engine run any better.

The Cold, Hard Football Fact, proven through all of NFL history, is that the impact of wide receivers is wildly overvalued by fans, analysts and, most damningly, by teams, coaches and executives, like Dimitroff, who should know better ... but don't.

The Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law proved so powerful in the 2010 season that we elevated it from the Shiny Hood Ornament Theory to its present status. It is no longer an idea or a concept. It is an irrefutable state of nature and exists all around us. Call it gravity for the gridiron.

The 2011 Falcons are the latest team to challenge the Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law, then hurt itself plummeting back to Earth in the process.

Atlanta torched badly chasing a Shiny Hood Ornament

The Falcons failed to study the Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law back in the 2011 draft. So they not only drafted wide receiver Jones in the first round, which is almost always a mistake, but also did the unthinkable to make it happen. They mortgaged their future, trading five draft picks to move up the draft board to grab Jones with the No. 6 overall pick. In other words, the Falcons made other parts of the team worse in the belief that a Shiny Hood Ornament would make the entire Atlanta vehicle run better.

We knew it was a bad move the moment it happened, especially for a team that went 13-3 the year before but failed to win a single playoff game because of problems that were exposed so badly by the Packers. In fact, we issued Atlanta a D- in our Sports Illustrated draft grades. So we're not engaging in a little revisionist history. The Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law told us it was an impending disaster the second the deal unfolded.

The mistake on draft day proved to be a mistake all year, as Atlanta took a step back by every meaningful measure.

The Atlanta Falcons' decline

2010 2011 Record 13-3 10-6 Playoff seed No. 1 No. 5 Points scored 414 402 Points allowed 288 350

So here's what the Falcons got for their five draft picks: they won fewer games, scored fewer points, surrendered more points and tumbled from the No. 1 seed to the No. 5 seed -- all because they believed placing a bright Shiny Hood Ornament on the offense would make the team run faster.

Oh, and just for good measure, they have no No. 1 pick in the 2012 draft to help fix the obvious problems, like an offensive line that can't get a push when needed and a defense that fell off badly. Other than that, it was a great decision to mortgage the future to pick up a Shiny Hood Ornament.

The disaster unfolds Sunday in front of Football Nation

The stupidity of the decision came crashing down on the Falcons for all of Football Nation to see on Sunday: the Atlanta passing game was a disaster, the Falcons were shut out, the offensive line was overmatched and its receivers were no-shows. Here's what we said Sunday in our Falcons-Giants grades on SI.com:

"Atlanta's star-studded pass-catching corps of Jones, Roddy White and future Hall of Fame tight end Tony Gonzalez were non-factors, unable to get separation. They combined for 16 ineffective catches for 160 yards. Decent numbers, but zero game-changing plays for such a high-profile trio."

And that statement, in a nutshell, is a very good explanation of why receivers are Shiny Hood Ornaments. They can't make game-changing plays if the QB can't get them the ball. A lot of things have to be working right for Shiny Hood Ornaments to, first, get the ball and, second, do something meaningful with it.

Even the best Shiny Hood Ornaments touch the ball only four or five times a game -- a fact that seems lost on analysts and executives who habitually over-value their impact. (By the way, Gonzalez is another example of the Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law in action. He's the all-time leader in everything by a tight end. What's he got for it? He has 16 catches, 157 yards, two TDs and zero wins in five career playoff games, including a quiet four catches for 44 yards on Sunday.)

So here's what the Falcons got Sunday for those five draft picks in the biggest game of the year:

1. They got an offense that scored zero points against a team that surrendered 400 points during the regular season, the most by any playoff team.

2. They got seven ineffective catches for 64 yards -- just 9.1 YPC -- from Jones, a guy who's supposed to be a once-in-a-lifetime game-changer.

3. They got zero movement from their offensive line in one key short-yardage situation after another -- a nail-spitting animal at right guard would have been a lot more valuable to the Falcons in the biggest game of the year than an over-valued Shiny Hood Ornament.

There was also a certain irony to the fact the Falcons and their Shiny Hood Ornament were overwhelmed by the Giants. New York's leading receiver this year was Victor Cruz, who set a franchise record with 1,536 receiving yards, including a signature record-tying 99-yard touchdown reception in a must-win game over the Jets on Christmas Eve.

The record-setting Cruz was an undrafted free agent out of UMass. Yes, he's a Shiny Hood Ornament, too. He still only touches the ball four or five times per game. But the Giants found him with their morning coffee one day in 2010. They didn't make their team worse in the effort to land him. He's productive because he's paired with a great quarterback.

QBs make WRS; WRs do not make QBs

All of which brings us to the elephant in the room in Atlanta's 2011 post-mortem of pigskin: Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan simply can't get it done.

He's consistently had trouble getting the ball downfield throughout his career, and has now played poorly in three straight playoff games. In fact, Ryan has statistically stagnated somewhere well below mediocre in his three postseason games, all losses: 72.8 rating in the 2008 playoffs; 69.0 rating in the 2010 playoffs; and 71.1 rating here in the 2011 playoffs.

t doesn't matter how many so-called "weapons" you put around a quarterback. The Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law tells us that quarterbacks make wide receivers, not the other way around. And right now we have four years of evidence saying that Ryan is not good enough to make his receivers better.

In either case, executives and coaches who are unaware of the Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law are like physicists are unaware of Newton's Laws of Motion. They have no business being in the field and need to find another line of work.

Read more: http://sportsillustr...l#ixzz1snSG9cO6

Not really much to read from this kid anymore... everything he says pretty much sounds the same.... and it all equals bash the falcons... I really hope this is not your only form of entertainment in life, because if it is I truely feel sorry for you... actually I feel sorry for you in general anyway.....

Edited by markdzul
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The Giants pounded the testosterone out of the Falcons Sunday, with a dominant 24-2 victory that left no doubt about who were the men and who were the boys in this NFC battle.

Atlanta's only points were a safety generated by the defense. That's right, folks: Here in a season when passing records are being shredded like old Enron balance sheets, Matt Ryan and his galaxy of so-called star receivers were shut out, blanked, zip-o-fied.

The entire punch-less offensive (in both senses of the word) effort was an indictment of the team's disastrous decision to mortgage its future to move up the board to grab Julio Jones in the first round of the 2011 draft. General manager Thomas Dimitroff should be forced to walk the pigskin plank for orchestrating this foul-sounding yet predictable disaster.

So the game was not just a win for the Giants. It was also a win for the only force in football since the 1972 Dolphins to go undefeated and untied: the Cold, Hard Football Facts Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law.

If you're new to the Mighty CHFF, this Man Law tells us that wide receivers are nothing more than Shiny Hood Ornaments decorating the engine of NFL teams. They look all nice and flashy and they cause fans to "ooh" and "ahh." But they don't make the engine run any better.

The Cold, Hard Football Fact, proven through all of NFL history, is that the impact of wide receivers is wildly overvalued by fans, analysts and, most damningly, by teams, coaches and executives, like Dimitroff, who should know better ... but don't.

The Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law proved so powerful in the 2010 season that we elevated it from the Shiny Hood Ornament Theory to its present status. It is no longer an idea or a concept. It is an irrefutable state of nature and exists all around us. Call it gravity for the gridiron.

The 2011 Falcons are the latest team to challenge the Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law, then hurt itself plummeting back to Earth in the process.

Atlanta torched badly chasing a Shiny Hood Ornament

The Falcons failed to study the Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law back in the 2011 draft. So they not only drafted wide receiver Jones in the first round, which is almost always a mistake, but also did the unthinkable to make it happen. They mortgaged their future, trading five draft picks to move up the draft board to grab Jones with the No. 6 overall pick. In other words, the Falcons made other parts of the team worse in the belief that a Shiny Hood Ornament would make the entire Atlanta vehicle run better.

We knew it was a bad move the moment it happened, especially for a team that went 13-3 the year before but failed to win a single playoff game because of problems that were exposed so badly by the Packers. In fact, we issued Atlanta a D- in our Sports Illustrated draft grades. So we're not engaging in a little revisionist history. The Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law told us it was an impending disaster the second the deal unfolded.

The mistake on draft day proved to be a mistake all year, as Atlanta took a step back by every meaningful measure.

The Atlanta Falcons' decline

2010 2011 Record 13-3 10-6 Playoff seed No. 1 No. 5 Points scored 414 402 Points allowed 288 350

So here's what the Falcons got for their five draft picks: they won fewer games, scored fewer points, surrendered more points and tumbled from the No. 1 seed to the No. 5 seed -- all because they believed placing a bright Shiny Hood Ornament on the offense would make the team run faster.

Oh, and just for good measure, they have no No. 1 pick in the 2012 draft to help fix the obvious problems, like an offensive line that can't get a push when needed and a defense that fell off badly. Other than that, it was a great decision to mortgage the future to pick up a Shiny Hood Ornament.

The disaster unfolds Sunday in front of Football Nation

The stupidity of the decision came crashing down on the Falcons for all of Football Nation to see on Sunday: the Atlanta passing game was a disaster, the Falcons were shut out, the offensive line was overmatched and its receivers were no-shows. Here's what we said Sunday in our Falcons-Giants grades on SI.com:

"Atlanta's star-studded pass-catching corps of Jones, Roddy White and future Hall of Fame tight end Tony Gonzalez were non-factors, unable to get separation. They combined for 16 ineffective catches for 160 yards. Decent numbers, but zero game-changing plays for such a high-profile trio."

And that statement, in a nutshell, is a very good explanation of why receivers are Shiny Hood Ornaments. They can't make game-changing plays if the QB can't get them the ball. A lot of things have to be working right for Shiny Hood Ornaments to, first, get the ball and, second, do something meaningful with it.

Even the best Shiny Hood Ornaments touch the ball only four or five times a game -- a fact that seems lost on analysts and executives who habitually over-value their impact. (By the way, Gonzalez is another example of the Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law in action. He's the all-time leader in everything by a tight end. What's he got for it? He has 16 catches, 157 yards, two TDs and zero wins in five career playoff games, including a quiet four catches for 44 yards on Sunday.)

So here's what the Falcons got Sunday for those five draft picks in the biggest game of the year:

1. They got an offense that scored zero points against a team that surrendered 400 points during the regular season, the most by any playoff team.

2. They got seven ineffective catches for 64 yards -- just 9.1 YPC -- from Jones, a guy who's supposed to be a once-in-a-lifetime game-changer.

3. They got zero movement from their offensive line in one key short-yardage situation after another -- a nail-spitting animal at right guard would have been a lot more valuable to the Falcons in the biggest game of the year than an over-valued Shiny Hood Ornament.

There was also a certain irony to the fact the Falcons and their Shiny Hood Ornament were overwhelmed by the Giants. New York's leading receiver this year was Victor Cruz, who set a franchise record with 1,536 receiving yards, including a signature record-tying 99-yard touchdown reception in a must-win game over the Jets on Christmas Eve.

The record-setting Cruz was an undrafted free agent out of UMass. Yes, he's a Shiny Hood Ornament, too. He still only touches the ball four or five times per game. But the Giants found him with their morning coffee one day in 2010. They didn't make their team worse in the effort to land him. He's productive because he's paired with a great quarterback.

QBs make WRS; WRs do not make QBs

All of which brings us to the elephant in the room in Atlanta's 2011 post-mortem of pigskin: Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan simply can't get it done.

He's consistently had trouble getting the ball downfield throughout his career, and has now played poorly in three straight playoff games. In fact, Ryan has statistically stagnated somewhere well below mediocre in his three postseason games, all losses: 72.8 rating in the 2008 playoffs; 69.0 rating in the 2010 playoffs; and 71.1 rating here in the 2011 playoffs.

t doesn't matter how many so-called "weapons" you put around a quarterback. The Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law tells us that quarterbacks make wide receivers, not the other way around. And right now we have four years of evidence saying that Ryan is not good enough to make his receivers better.

In either case, executives and coaches who are unaware of the Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law are like physicists are unaware of Newton's Laws of Motion. They have no business being in the field and need to find another line of work.

Read more: http://sportsillustr...l#ixzz1snSG9cO6

Since when is seven catches ineffective?

Edited by Falcanuck
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Swift,

Listen my friend...I'm very concerned about you. You and I have been pleasant and cordial toward one another with the exception of some jabs about Matt Ryan--you've complimented some of my comments and I some of yours.

But this unending, unwavering extreme obsessive compulsive behavior toward anything Matt Ryan genuinely has me concerned for your health!

So I ask in all sincerity...what can I do to help?

Best wishes,

QB

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The Giants pounded the testosterone out of the Falcons Sunday, with a dominant 24-2 victory that left no doubt about who were the men and who were the boys in this NFC battle.

Atlanta's only points were a safety generated by the defense. That's right, folks: Here in a season when passing records are being shredded like old Enron balance sheets, Matt Ryan and his galaxy of so-called star receivers were shut out, blanked, zip-o-fied.

The entire punch-less offensive (in both senses of the word) effort was an indictment of the team's disastrous decision to mortgage its future to move up the board to grab Julio Jones in the first round of the 2011 draft. General manager Thomas Dimitroff should be forced to walk the pigskin plank for orchestrating this foul-sounding yet predictable disaster.

So the game was not just a win for the Giants. It was also a win for the only force in football since the 1972 Dolphins to go undefeated and untied: the Cold, Hard Football Facts Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law.

If you're new to the Mighty CHFF, this Man Law tells us that wide receivers are nothing more than Shiny Hood Ornaments decorating the engine of NFL teams. They look all nice and flashy and they cause fans to "ooh" and "ahh." But they don't make the engine run any better.

The Cold, Hard Football Fact, proven through all of NFL history, is that the impact of wide receivers is wildly overvalued by fans, analysts and, most damningly, by teams, coaches and executives, like Dimitroff, who should know better ... but don't.

The Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law proved so powerful in the 2010 season that we elevated it from the Shiny Hood Ornament Theory to its present status. It is no longer an idea or a concept. It is an irrefutable state of nature and exists all around us. Call it gravity for the gridiron.

The 2011 Falcons are the latest team to challenge the Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law, then hurt itself plummeting back to Earth in the process.

Atlanta torched badly chasing a Shiny Hood Ornament

The Falcons failed to study the Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law back in the 2011 draft. So they not only drafted wide receiver Jones in the first round, which is almost always a mistake, but also did the unthinkable to make it happen. They mortgaged their future, trading five draft picks to move up the draft board to grab Jones with the No. 6 overall pick. In other words, the Falcons made other parts of the team worse in the belief that a Shiny Hood Ornament would make the entire Atlanta vehicle run better.

We knew it was a bad move the moment it happened, especially for a team that went 13-3 the year before but failed to win a single playoff game because of problems that were exposed so badly by the Packers. In fact, we issued Atlanta a D- in our Sports Illustrated draft grades. So we're not engaging in a little revisionist history. The Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law told us it was an impending disaster the second the deal unfolded.

The mistake on draft day proved to be a mistake all year, as Atlanta took a step back by every meaningful measure.

The Atlanta Falcons' decline

2010 2011 Record 13-3 10-6 Playoff seed No. 1 No. 5 Points scored 414 402 Points allowed 288 350

So here's what the Falcons got for their five draft picks: they won fewer games, scored fewer points, surrendered more points and tumbled from the No. 1 seed to the No. 5 seed -- all because they believed placing a bright Shiny Hood Ornament on the offense would make the team run faster.

Oh, and just for good measure, they have no No. 1 pick in the 2012 draft to help fix the obvious problems, like an offensive line that can't get a push when needed and a defense that fell off badly. Other than that, it was a great decision to mortgage the future to pick up a Shiny Hood Ornament.

The disaster unfolds Sunday in front of Football Nation

The stupidity of the decision came crashing down on the Falcons for all of Football Nation to see on Sunday: the Atlanta passing game was a disaster, the Falcons were shut out, the offensive line was overmatched and its receivers were no-shows. Here's what we said Sunday in our Falcons-Giants grades on SI.com:

"Atlanta's star-studded pass-catching corps of Jones, Roddy White and future Hall of Fame tight end Tony Gonzalez were non-factors, unable to get separation. They combined for 16 ineffective catches for 160 yards. Decent numbers, but zero game-changing plays for such a high-profile trio."

And that statement, in a nutshell, is a very good explanation of why receivers are Shiny Hood Ornaments. They can't make game-changing plays if the QB can't get them the ball. A lot of things have to be working right for Shiny Hood Ornaments to, first, get the ball and, second, do something meaningful with it.

Even the best Shiny Hood Ornaments touch the ball only four or five times a game -- a fact that seems lost on analysts and executives who habitually over-value their impact. (By the way, Gonzalez is another example of the Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law in action. He's the all-time leader in everything by a tight end. What's he got for it? He has 16 catches, 157 yards, two TDs and zero wins in five career playoff games, including a quiet four catches for 44 yards on Sunday.)

So here's what the Falcons got Sunday for those five draft picks in the biggest game of the year:

1. They got an offense that scored zero points against a team that surrendered 400 points during the regular season, the most by any playoff team.

2. They got seven ineffective catches for 64 yards -- just 9.1 YPC -- from Jones, a guy who's supposed to be a once-in-a-lifetime game-changer.

3. They got zero movement from their offensive line in one key short-yardage situation after another -- a nail-spitting animal at right guard would have been a lot more valuable to the Falcons in the biggest game of the year than an over-valued Shiny Hood Ornament.

There was also a certain irony to the fact the Falcons and their Shiny Hood Ornament were overwhelmed by the Giants. New York's leading receiver this year was Victor Cruz, who set a franchise record with 1,536 receiving yards, including a signature record-tying 99-yard touchdown reception in a must-win game over the Jets on Christmas Eve.

The record-setting Cruz was an undrafted free agent out of UMass. Yes, he's a Shiny Hood Ornament, too. He still only touches the ball four or five times per game. But the Giants found him with their morning coffee one day in 2010. They didn't make their team worse in the effort to land him. He's productive because he's paired with a great quarterback.

QBs make WRS; WRs do not make QBs

All of which brings us to the elephant in the room in Atlanta's 2011 post-mortem of pigskin: Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan simply can't get it done.

He's consistently had trouble getting the ball downfield throughout his career, and has now played poorly in three straight playoff games. In fact, Ryan has statistically stagnated somewhere well below mediocre in his three postseason games, all losses: 72.8 rating in the 2008 playoffs; 69.0 rating in the 2010 playoffs; and 71.1 rating here in the 2011 playoffs.

t doesn't matter how many so-called "weapons" you put around a quarterback. The Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law tells us that quarterbacks make wide receivers, not the other way around. And right now we have four years of evidence saying that Ryan is not good enough to make his receivers better.

In either case, executives and coaches who are unaware of the Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law are like physicists are unaware of Newton's Laws of Motion. They have no business being in the field and need to find another line of work.

Read more: http://sportsillustr...l#ixzz1snSG9cO6

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I'm not comfortable with what we gave up, but we'll have forgotten about what we gave up by next season. Julio is the real deal.

You can always count on Swift or Muskoka to come in and destroy a thread with their Ryan Bashing. No matter what the subject matter, Michael Lombardi or Julio Jones. There is no subject these fools can't turn into a see who can slam Ryan first contest.

He finds one article against of myriad of positive ones, and all of sudden he thinks he's right about everything. Hilarious.

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I'm not comfortable with what we gave up, but we'll have forgotten about what we gave up by next season. Julio is the real deal.

You can always count on Swift or Muskoka to come in and destroy a thread with their Ryan Bashing. No matter what the subject matter, Michael Lombardi or Julio Jones. There is no subject these fools can't turn into a see who can slam Ryan first contest.

He finds one article against of myriad of positive ones, and all of sudden he thinks he's right about everything. Hilarious.

The sad thing is I posted an article that was published 2 days ago. He has to go all the way back to January to find this article slamming the Jones trade and then highlights and part that slams Matt Ryan. It's disgusting.

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You can always count on Swift or Muskoka to come in and destroy a thread with their Ryan Bashing. No matter what the subject matter, Michael Lombardi or Julio Jones. There is no subject these fools can't turn into a see who can slam Ryan first contest.

You should probably add armstrengthcoach and maybe FFS1970 to that list, assuming they're not all the same person.

Edited by hjerry
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I agree with you Falconsfan567 as i do with most of your post. I'm normally not a fan of trading away your future, however now that we are here, you have to be glad that after this draft Julio as far as draft picks are concerned is "paid for" We had high drafdt picks and I know we need line help offense & defense, but who could we have drafted that would have changed the 24-2 defeat from the Giants.The defense didn't play bad. Really the offense didn't play bad, we were in Giants territory often including the 4th & 1's. The problem was we did not excute any of the key plays that you need to have to win any game especially a tough playoff one. If there was any group or individual that let us down, it was the offensive line. We have a 1st rounder in Sam Baker on the line, you can't very well draft another one until you have decided that Baker is not your answer, and at draft time last year that decision had not been made.So it was very unlikely that you would have drafted a 1st round offensive lineman anyway. I'm not happy with our defense, however we can't just keep drafting non impact DT's & DE's It's time to see what Sidbury can do, plus you picked up Edwards in F/A . Jerry was just coming off his injury so you have to give him a chance & even though Peters played well, Jerry's performance this year I'm sure will dictate his future.At DB we felt Robinson & Grimes could hold the edges down, we supported that decision with the F/A signing of Hayden. Moore is solid & they had faith in DeCoud. The bottom line is that even if you feel that the defense had under performed Who was the draft pick to change all that. Julio gave us the opportunity to hit homeruns at any given time. Plus with Roddy now 30, you have to start thinking of his successor at the #1 reciever spot. Kinda like the Colts did with Harrison & Wayne. Julio is a franchise reciever ,nobody disputes that. The opportunity to get a franchise player at any position,is something you have to persue it. When even this year I don't see a 1st round player that we could have drafted that would have Julio's long term impact. It may of cost us somethinmg, but we will clearly come out with more in this deal. Heck ask Cleveland how are their traded pick is working out for them?

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You should probably add armstrengthcoach and maybe FFS1970 to that list, assuming they're not all the same person.

Phalcon Phil (armstrength coach is like his 7th username) is a joke. He adds absolutely nothing, He's just a ****. Swift and Muskoka are just delusional and believe what they say, despite the fact it's absurd.

FFS1970 is a good dude, he has his moments, and the "Trust me" thing reminds me of a Used car salesman. He just needs to learn to let go when players leave, and realize that the modern day NFL is nothing like it was in the 70s and that;s not necessarily a bad thing.

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The Giants pounded the testosterone out of the Falcons Sunday, with a dominant 24-2 victory that left no doubt about who were the men and who were the boys in this NFC battle.

Atlanta's only points were a safety generated by the defense. That's right, folks: Here in a season when passing records are being shredded like old Enron balance sheets, Matt Ryan and his galaxy of so-called star receivers were shut out, blanked, zip-o-fied.

The entire punch-less offensive (in both senses of the word) effort was an indictment of the team's disastrous decision to mortgage its future to move up the board to grab Julio Jones in the first round of the 2011 draft. General manager Thomas Dimitroff should be forced to walk the pigskin plank for orchestrating this foul-sounding yet predictable disaster.

So the game was not just a win for the Giants. It was also a win for the only force in football since the 1972 Dolphins to go undefeated and untied: the Cold, Hard Football Facts Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law.

If you're new to the Mighty CHFF, this Man Law tells us that wide receivers are nothing more than Shiny Hood Ornaments decorating the engine of NFL teams. They look all nice and flashy and they cause fans to "ooh" and "ahh." But they don't make the engine run any better.

The Cold, Hard Football Fact, proven through all of NFL history, is that the impact of wide receivers is wildly overvalued by fans, analysts and, most damningly, by teams, coaches and executives, like Dimitroff, who should know better ... but don't.

The Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law proved so powerful in the 2010 season that we elevated it from the Shiny Hood Ornament Theory to its present status. It is no longer an idea or a concept. It is an irrefutable state of nature and exists all around us. Call it gravity for the gridiron.

The 2011 Falcons are the latest team to challenge the Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law, then hurt itself plummeting back to Earth in the process.

Atlanta torched badly chasing a Shiny Hood Ornament

The Falcons failed to study the Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law back in the 2011 draft. So they not only drafted wide receiver Jones in the first round, which is almost always a mistake, but also did the unthinkable to make it happen. They mortgaged their future, trading five draft picks to move up the draft board to grab Jones with the No. 6 overall pick. In other words, the Falcons made other parts of the team worse in the belief that a Shiny Hood Ornament would make the entire Atlanta vehicle run better.

We knew it was a bad move the moment it happened, especially for a team that went 13-3 the year before but failed to win a single playoff game because of problems that were exposed so badly by the Packers. In fact, we issued Atlanta a D- in our Sports Illustrated draft grades. So we're not engaging in a little revisionist history. The Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law told us it was an impending disaster the second the deal unfolded.

The mistake on draft day proved to be a mistake all year, as Atlanta took a step back by every meaningful measure.

The Atlanta Falcons' decline

2010 2011 Record 13-3 10-6 Playoff seed No. 1 No. 5 Points scored 414 402 Points allowed 288 350

So here's what the Falcons got for their five draft picks: they won fewer games, scored fewer points, surrendered more points and tumbled from the No. 1 seed to the No. 5 seed -- all because they believed placing a bright Shiny Hood Ornament on the offense would make the team run faster.

Oh, and just for good measure, they have no No. 1 pick in the 2012 draft to help fix the obvious problems, like an offensive line that can't get a push when needed and a defense that fell off badly. Other than that, it was a great decision to mortgage the future to pick up a Shiny Hood Ornament.

The disaster unfolds Sunday in front of Football Nation

The stupidity of the decision came crashing down on the Falcons for all of Football Nation to see on Sunday: the Atlanta passing game was a disaster, the Falcons were shut out, the offensive line was overmatched and its receivers were no-shows. Here's what we said Sunday in our Falcons-Giants grades on SI.com:

"Atlanta's star-studded pass-catching corps of Jones, Roddy White and future Hall of Fame tight end Tony Gonzalez were non-factors, unable to get separation. They combined for 16 ineffective catches for 160 yards. Decent numbers, but zero game-changing plays for such a high-profile trio."

And that statement, in a nutshell, is a very good explanation of why receivers are Shiny Hood Ornaments. They can't make game-changing plays if the QB can't get them the ball. A lot of things have to be working right for Shiny Hood Ornaments to, first, get the ball and, second, do something meaningful with it.

Even the best Shiny Hood Ornaments touch the ball only four or five times a game -- a fact that seems lost on analysts and executives who habitually over-value their impact. (By the way, Gonzalez is another example of the Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law in action. He's the all-time leader in everything by a tight end. What's he got for it? He has 16 catches, 157 yards, two TDs and zero wins in five career playoff games, including a quiet four catches for 44 yards on Sunday.)

So here's what the Falcons got Sunday for those five draft picks in the biggest game of the year:

1. They got an offense that scored zero points against a team that surrendered 400 points during the regular season, the most by any playoff team.

2. They got seven ineffective catches for 64 yards -- just 9.1 YPC -- from Jones, a guy who's supposed to be a once-in-a-lifetime game-changer.

3. They got zero movement from their offensive line in one key short-yardage situation after another -- a nail-spitting animal at right guard would have been a lot more valuable to the Falcons in the biggest game of the year than an over-valued Shiny Hood Ornament.

There was also a certain irony to the fact the Falcons and their Shiny Hood Ornament were overwhelmed by the Giants. New York's leading receiver this year was Victor Cruz, who set a franchise record with 1,536 receiving yards, including a signature record-tying 99-yard touchdown reception in a must-win game over the Jets on Christmas Eve.

The record-setting Cruz was an undrafted free agent out of UMass. Yes, he's a Shiny Hood Ornament, too. He still only touches the ball four or five times per game. But the Giants found him with their morning coffee one day in 2010. They didn't make their team worse in the effort to land him. He's productive because he's paired with a great quarterback.

QBs make WRS; WRs do not make QBs

All of which brings us to the elephant in the room in Atlanta's 2011 post-mortem of pigskin: Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan simply can't get it done.

He's consistently had trouble getting the ball downfield throughout his career, and has now played poorly in three straight playoff games. In fact, Ryan has statistically stagnated somewhere well below mediocre in his three postseason games, all losses: 72.8 rating in the 2008 playoffs; 69.0 rating in the 2010 playoffs; and 71.1 rating here in the 2011 playoffs.

t doesn't matter how many so-called "weapons" you put around a quarterback. The Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law tells us that quarterbacks make wide receivers, not the other way around. And right now we have four years of evidence saying that Ryan is not good enough to make his receivers better.

In either case, executives and coaches who are unaware of the Shiny Hood Ornament Man Law are like physicists are unaware of Newton's Laws of Motion. They have no business being in the field and need to find another line of work.

Read more: http://sportsillustr...l#ixzz1snSG9cO6

You should change your screenname to "theoppositeofsex", because there is no ******* way you ever get laid.

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Don't mention the word 'laid", he's gonna lose it. Ask Duff man about that.

Gonna lose it? He lost it a long time ago. He spends 10 hours a day arguing about a grown man that he doesn't like. That is beyond sad.

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I want to see who we could have picked instead that would have caused us to beat the Giants.

The Saints mortgaged their future on a freakin RB of all positions. Last I checked they lost in the playoffs too. Where are the articles blasting them? At least our player made an impact.

Because the Saints are media darlings.

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Thanks for posting the article by Mark Bradley falconfan567. While I was hesitant at first on the Jones trade, I could see the logic behind it, and after watching the guy I am think it was one of the best moves we ever made in Flowery Branch. There is a large crop of players out there that are average NFL starters, which by itself makes them rare commodities. I always viewed the picks we gave up as being in that tier of players at best, and some might not have even reached that level of skill. However, players like JJ are extremely rare, and only come along very once in a while. We are very fortunate that TD had the keen eye to spot that kind of talent, and the kahoneys to go out and secure him for our future.

BTW, in regard to the mental cases mentioned above who have obsessed agendas, I have found the "ignore preferences" feature in the "your profile" section to be invaluable in maximizing my fun here on the boards. I highly recommend you use that feature, and if you check my list, I think you will find I have the most severe nut cases on there.

Edited by FalconFanForLife
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Thanks for posting the article by Mark Bradley falconfan567. While I was hesitant at first on the Jones trade, I could see the logic behind it, and after watching the guy I am think it was one of the best moves we ever made in Flowery Branch. There is a large crop of players out there that are average NFL starters, which by itself makes them rare commodities. I always viewed the picks we gave up as being in that tier of players at best, and some might not have even reached that level of skill. However, players like JJ are extremely rare, and only come along very once in a while. We are very fortunate that TD had the keen eye to spot that kind of talent, and the kahoneys to go out and secure him for our future.

BTW, in regard to the mental cases mentioned above who have obsessed agendas, I have found the "ignore preferences" feature in the "your profile" section to be invaluable in maximizing my fun here on the boards. I highly recommend you use that feature, and if you check my list, I think you will find I have the most severe nut cases on there.

I did that for a while, then they would start PM me, or calling me out in other people's quotes because I defended our franchise QB. Until we get real moderation here it's going to be like this for a while.

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I did that for a while, then they would start PM me, or calling me out in other people's quotes because I defended our franchise QB. Until we get real moderation here it's going to be like this for a while.

This message board is really lucky to have you as it's resident policeman. Why don't you take a screen shot of these PMs and post it? Until then, you're just a child in need of a diaper change.

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This message board is really lucky to have you as it's resident policeman. Why don't you take a screen shot of these PMs and post it? Until then, you're just a child in need of a diaper change.

Why would he do that. He makes threats again my life and was talking about making one call and that's all. paulitik is delusional but that's not the issue here. This thread is about Julio being worth it and he is.

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