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Why Black People Don't Trust The Police


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I don't trust cops and I don't know many black people who do.

I respect them. I sympathize with them. I am appreciative of the work they do.

But when you've been pulled over for no good reason as many times as I have; when you've been in handcuffs for no good reason as many times as I have; when you run out to buy some allergy medication and upon returning home, find yourself surrounded by four squad cars with flashing lights and all you can think about is how not to get shot, you learn not to trust cops.

The first instance of injustice surrounding the Trayvon Martin tragedy occurred February 26, the night George Zimmerman decided to pursue, confront and ultimately shoot and kill Martin. The second started the moment the Sanford police failed to properly investigate what, given the 911 tapes, is clearly a questionable claim of self-defense made by Zimmerman. But seeing that Martin's parents were forced to sue the police department just to hear the tapes, it seems as if Zimmerman isn't the only questionable component in this case.

Thursday, Sanford Police Chief Bill Lee stepped down "temporarily." On Wednesday, Sanford city commissioners had voted "no confidence" in him.

But at a town hall meeting hosted by the NAACP on Tuesday, Sanford's black residents said they lost confidence in the police long before because of the extensive history of prejudicial treatment in the area.

Law enforcement isn't easy. In fact, it is extremely dangerous. But that in no way excuses improper procedure and lies. And given the amount of effort put forth by the Sanford chief to exonerate Zimmerman, a volunteer neighborhood watchman with a history of 911 calls that suggests paranoia, versus efforts to find out the truth, it sure feels like another case of racial profiling and police trying to cover up an impropriety. The shooter may not have been a police officer, but the story of how the police handled this case is oh-so-familiar.

It's the same story the nation heard from blacks in Los Angeles surrounding the 1991 Rodney King beating. It's the same story heard from blacks in New York City surrounding the murder of Amadou Diallo, who was only carrying his wallet when he was shot 41 times by four plainclothes policemen in 1999.

That same story was heard in New Orleans, where black men were shot and killed for sport by police officers off the Danziger Bridge in 2005. The police department covered it up for two years before any arrests were made. Charges were even initially dismissed by the district judge before the Justice Department got involved and finally, last summer, officers were convicted.

And people wonder where the impetus behind NWA's "___ the Police" came from. I'll tell you where it came from. It came from knowing there are far more stories like Trayvon Martin's that the world never hears about. In fact, we almost didn't hear about this one. The nation heard the 911 tapes from last month's tragic shooting at Chardon High School in Ohio within 24 hours of the incident. Martin's parents had to file a lawsuit before they could hear the ones in this case.

Why?

If the police department had done everything it was supposed to do, if it was truly "PROHIBITED from making an arrest based on the facts and circumstances they had at the time" as the letter released by the city manager states, then why hold back until there is national media attention?

The letter said the department was still investigating the case and didn't want to compromise it, but the authorities never brought Zimmerman in for questioning. They still haven't. They tested Martin's body for drugs and alcohol, but not Zimmerman's. The only person with a weapon was Zimmerman. Martin was unarmed. Just like the victims in New Orleans, Diallo, King. ...

In 2010, the family of Sean Bell was awarded $7 million by the city of New York after five police officers sprayed his car with more than 50 bullets, killing him. He was unarmed and to be married the next day.

"No amount of money can provide closure, no amount of money can make up for the pain," his fiancee, Nicole Paultre Bell, said after the ruling. "We'll just try to learn how to live with it and move on."

Those are words members of the black community have to say to each other far too many times when it comes to treatment by the police.

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Years? I say weeks.

Nah. Every week or so this happens in Oakland, Charlotte, Atlanta, New York, Philly, etc., but it only catches the national headlines every few years when the routine abuse of civil rights is so agregious, that it can't be ignored. Young black men in many cities know to stop and assume the position every time a cop car pulls alongside them, whether they did anything or not and that's just a fact of their life. So, the weekly mess will not be what gets noticed. It's only when it is so over the top that even the most ardent police supporters think "WTF!" that it ever goes national.

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I don't like cops either FWIW. don't like em, don't trust em, aint even gonna lie and say I appreciate the job they do. #### em.

That is all.

I'm cool with cops for the most part. The only cop that ever dissed me hard was a black cop who obviously had a chip on his shoulder and time to waste. I don't like the system that gives them the benefit of the doubt when they make mistakes like we all do. We scream like girls when a referee blows an obvious call in a game but we aren't supposed to question why someone got shot when he was unarmed and apparently minding his own business? Whatever.

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I think ending the War on Drugs would go a long way toward rolling back the over-aggressive, militant tactics city cops employ (which are disproportionately targeted toward minorities).

Yay then the drug dealers can roam the streets and screw minority communities up even worse than they already are.

Three hots and a cot for pushing poison to your people is the best deal going around right now.....especially in THIS economy.

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Nah. Every week or so this happens in Oakland, Charlotte, Atlanta, New York, Philly, etc., but it only catches the national headlines every few years when the routine abuse of civil rights is so agregious, that it can't be ignored. Young black men in many cities know to stop and assume the position every time a cop car pulls alongside them, whether they did anything or not and that's just a fact of their life. So, the weekly mess will not be what gets noticed. It's only when it is so over the top that even the most ardent police supporters think "WTF!" that it ever goes national.

I retract my previous statement

I love the police

Reported.

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Yay then the drug dealers can roam the streets and screw minority communities up even worse than they already are.

Three hots and a cot for pushing poison to your people is the best deal going around right now.....especially in THIS economy.

The War on Drugs has been lost for decades now. Just another reason to stack the jail full of addicts and minorities. Waste of time and money. Heck, people are getting hooked on drugs in prison.edit: And for the record, I don't have any problem with the police, but I totally understand why a alot of us do.
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Yay then the drug dealers can roam the streets and screw minority communities up even worse than they already are.

Three hots and a cot for pushing poison to your people is the best deal going around right now.....especially in THIS economy.

Or the drug dealers could be put out of business and drugs could be regulated, taxed, and sold in stores in such a way that it keeps them out of the hands of minors. Removes the profit incentive for gangs/dealers - thereby reducing violence - and also removes the biggest reason cops are sweating young black males in cities. And there'd be a ton of money to go toward treatment centers for junkies.

As for your second sentence- no.

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I do not think any one person, black, white or any other ethnic group can speak for one entire segment of the population as a whole. Therefore, when you say that blacks this or that or whites this or that, I am suspicious of what follows. I understand that people make similar statements all the time on TV and radio programs, but that alone does not make what they say about the group being discussed true. With regard to the specific question about trusting the police, I do trust them as a whole. However, they are a segment of society as a whole. Therefore, I suspect that you will find police officers who are bias and I suspect some are racist too. However, I think the majority of them are decent hard-working people just like the rest of us who have chosen to make a living risking their lives for the communities they serve.

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Or the drug dealers could be put out of business and drugs could be regulated, taxed, and sold in stores in such a way that it keeps them out of the hands of minors. Removes the profit incentive for gangs/dealers - thereby reducing violence - and also removes the biggest reason cops are sweating young black males in cities. And there'd be a ton of money to go toward treatment centers for junkies.

As for your second sentence- no.

You say that until your kid's bus driver is high and has an accident or until your grand-daughter ODs on legally obtained heroin. But then it's a whole new can of worms. Not saying that I agree with the war on drugs, but I can't see a good outcome for ending it either.

I do not think any one person, black, white or any other ethnic group can speak for one entire segment of the population as a whole. Therefore, when you say that blacks this or that or whites this or that, I am suspicious of what follows. I understand that people make similar statements all the time on TV and radio programs, but that alone does not make what they say about the group being discussed true. With regard to the specific question about trusting the police, I do trust them as a whole. However, they are a segment of society as a whole. Therefore, I suspect that you will find police officers who are bias and I suspect some are racist too. However, I think the majority of them are decent hard-working people just like the rest of us who have chosen to make a living risking their lives for the communities they serve.

I'm cool with cops so long as they apply the same (or higher) standards to their conduct as they do to mine. Otherwise they are more of a gang than a peace enforcement outfit. Any cop found lying to protect another should be sentenced to prison because if they lie under oath, there's no telling what other criminal activity they are involved in.

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Yay then the drug dealers can roam the streets and screw minority communities up even worse than they already are.

Three hots and a cot for pushing poison to your people is the best deal going around right now.....especially in THIS economy.

SMH

Wish there was a way I could spit in your face through a computer screen.dry.png

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You say that until your kid's bus driver is high and has an accident or until your grand-daughter ODs on legally obtained heroin.

People drink and drive and cause accidents everyday, probably kills a lot of people too. And replace heroin with prescription pills and that happens quite regularly too.

Not really sure where I was going with that but uh....yeah.

Eff the war on drugs.

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You say that until your kid's bus driver is high and has an accident or until your grand-daughter ODs on legally obtained heroin. But then it's a whole new can of worms. Not saying that I agree with the war on drugs, but I can't see a good outcome for ending it either.

Alcohol's legal and we don't have rampant drunk bus driver tragedies. There's no reason why employers would be forced to allow their employees to be high all the time.

As for your second example, is the grand-daughter a minor? If so, it wouldn't be legally obtained. And if not, then that's a tragedy, but an acceptable cost of freedom.

Adults should be free to ingest any substance they desire, even if it's harmful. That's the bottom line for me. The fact that it would also reduce crime and gov't spending and police harrassment are just nice side effects.

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People drink and drive and cause accidents everyday, probably kills a lot of people too. And replace heroin with prescription pills and that happens quite regularly too.

Not really sure where I was going with that but uh....yeah.

Eff the war on drugs.

I am well aware of alcohol abuse. However, in my experience, I trust a functional alcoholic to show up for work with less of a buzz than a functional geeker because I've never known a geeker to be functional.

Edited by JayOzOne
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protect yourselves....EVERYONE needs one of these. Not just to protect yourself from over aggressive cops but also for accidents

http://www.brickhous...gps-logger.html

That could also hang your azz in civil proceedings if you were indeed at fault in an accident, or even going slightly over the speed limit. Most modern cars have rudimentary data recorders built in anyway.

Still not a bad idea, especially re: police. I keep a digital voice recorder in my car and have had it recording everytime I've been pulled over in the past 5 years or so (only a couple times).

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Alcohol's legal and we don't have rampant drunk bus driver tragedies. There's no reason why employers would be forced to allow their employees to be high all the time.

As for your second example, is the grand-daughter a minor? If so, it wouldn't be legally obtained. And if not, then that's a tragedy, but an acceptable cost of freedom.

Adults should be free to ingest any substance they desire, even if it's harmful. That's the bottom line for me. The fact that it would also reduce crime and gov't spending and police harrassment are just nice side effects.

M'kay. I said "legally obtained" and used heroin because its users sometimes are confused enough to over ingest and kill themselves. And, at what age is someone old enough to start drugs? Should it be 18, so some of the kids at graduation parties can shoot up and celebrate their liberation? There are certainly limits to freedom and just as certainly a point at which consequences are unacceptable.

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