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I dont think we'll sign Marcus McNeill as i think his degenerative neck issues will scare off the Falcons FO just as they did Detroit. I cant help thinking as to why Detroit would rather sign a 34 year old compared to a 28 year old to play left tackle for them. Who would you rather if both completely healthy?? Begs the question...

Round 2, Pick 23: Zebrie Sanders, OT, 6-5 307

Analysis:

Pass Blocking - Footwork and technique are usually very good. Has a balanced and agile pass protection set that handles all motions effectively. Hand placement is excellent. The one concern is handling the super quick edge rusher. Foot speed and quickness are very good, but not elite. Has the power and bend needed to anchor against the bull rush. Sometimes will attempt to punch too soon, lunge, and fail to transfer power properly as a result.

Run Blocking - Has the ability to sink hips and generate real power with strong hands. Consistently moves defenders back. Grades out extremely well in every aspect of run blocking.

Pulling/Trapping - Outstanding blocking ability on the move. Would grade highly as an OG prospect as well. Agility is very good and power is excellent. Puts a lot of defenders on the ground. Stays low and uses excellent technique.

Initial Quickness - Is usually very good in this area. Fires off the snap and gets push on run plays. First step is quick when pulling. Is rarely beaten off the snap by pass rushers. As with all OTs, crowd noise can limit ability to hear QB.

Downfield - Is athletic and can run, plant, seal, sink hips, and deliver powerful blocks where the play dictates. Consistently makes quality second level blocks.

Intangibles - About the highest possible grade here. Smart, durable, healthy, experienced, and high character. The demonstrated ability to switch from ORT to OLT without any problems is perhaps the best tribute to this prospect's intangibles.

NFL Comparison: Trent Williams - Washington Redskins

Round 3, Pick 22: Alameda Ta'amu, DT, 6-3 348

Analysis:

Pass rush: Surprising initial quickness off the snap. Wide-bodied frame makes it difficult for him to split gaps, but shows a burst when he has a lane. Developing swim move. Relies mostly on a simple bull rush at this point, which is quite effective in collapsing the pocket. Only phone booth quickness. Gives good effort in chasing down the quarterback, but tires quickly.

Run defense: Strong, stout interior presence who often requires double-team blocks to keep him from clogging running lanes. Short, thick legs and thick trunk which aid him in anchoring. Inconsistent in his effort pursuing laterally and downfield, but surprises opponents with his quickness for such a large man. Short arms could lead to problems against NFL-caliber offensive linemen with longer arms able to get into his chest …

Explosion: Flashes an explosive initial burst off the snap to split gaps, especially when guards vacate the hole to pull. Has the upper body strength to rock his opponent back onto his heels. Quicker and more athletic than his body would lead you to believe, flashing startling explosiveness as a tackler when he gains momentum.

Strength: Powerful man who often requires double-teams. Excellent strength in his upper and lower, though his short limbs limit his effectiveness, at times. Relies heavily on his bull rush to pressure the quarterback. Often is at his most effective as a run-stuffer by simply creating a pile in the middle due to his ability to anchor.

Tackling: Makes most of his tackles by simpyl bludgeoning the ball-carrier. Lacks the quick-twitch muscles and lateral agility to break down in space, but has such great strength that he often is able to grab the ball-carrier with one arm, slow his momentum and grab on with his other arm to pull the ball-carrier to the ground. Inconsistent effort in pursuit, but generates impressive momentum when he's moving at full-speed and can rock the ball-carrier with an explosive hit.

Intangibles: Struggled with his weight early in his career. Has weighed as much as 390 pounds and played at 360, at times. Committed himself to extra conditioning and taking rice -- a staple of the Samoan culture -- out of his diet. He weighed in at 337 pounds for the 2011 Holiday Bowl. Suffered a broken foot during his senior year of high school.

NFL Comparison: Terrance Cody - Baltimore Ravens

Round 5, Pick 22: Travis Lewis, OLB, 6-1 246

Analysis:

Read & React: Combines very good instincts with above-average reaction skills. Almost always finds the ball in traffic. Greet feel in coverage, sees quarterback and receiver, jumps routes to prevent completion, or at least stop yards after the catch. One-man wrecking crew against screens because he sniffs them out and has the quickness to grab the receiver.

Run defense: Tougher between the tackles than many expect. Gap-shooter that grabs backs before they get through the line, also willing to throw his body into the hole to create piles and stands up to blocks to stay in the play. Feels pulling lineman coming, capable of punching to stay clean or take the outside shoulder to keep runners from bouncing to the sideline. Lacks strength to blow up fullbacks and bulk/length to prevent getting engulfed by better lineman at the second level.

Pass defense: Fluid and quick drop into zone, covers enough ground to be Tampa-Two mike and knows where the markers are. Often arrives at the receiver at the same time as the ball, gives up few yards after the catch. Possesses straight-line speed stay with or chase down receivers in man. Creates turnovers with quick reaction time to bring in tipped balls, closes on balls over the middle or baits quarterbacks intro throwing his directions if they do not seeing his deep drop. Loses size battle to many tight ends, easily pushed away on out routes. Caught looking into backfield occasionally instead of getting to receiver in the flat. Tries to cradle throws at times instead of snatching them, resulting in dropped interceptions.

Tackling: As secure and reliable a tackler as you'll see in college football. Not necessarily explosive, but more physical than a chase-and-drag linebacker. Breaks down well in space, corrals elusive ballcarriers on the edge or inside by wrapping torso and holding on. Gets leverage inside to stop piles from moving forward. Leaves his feet at times, NFL backs will take advantage.

Pass Rush/Blitz: Works more in space than attacking the backfield, but flashes closing speed and agility to reach passers from the blind side or up the middle before they can escape. Knocks down some quarterbacks with just a glancing blow. Takes advantage of large holes to get to the quarterback, but must work on using violent hands to rip off lineman and defeat cut blocks from running backs. Also needs to build a variety of pass rush moves.

Intangibles: Team captain who leads the team on and off the field with words and by example. Four-year starter for one of the top programs in the country. No known character or off-field issues.

NFL Comparison: Lance Briggs - Chicago Bears

Round 6, Pick 23: Jacquies Smith, DE/OLB, 6-3 255

Analysis:

Pass rush: Flashes a quick first step when allowed to get after the passer. Moved inside on third downs to pressure interior linemen, works hard to get through doubles to chase the passer. Smart player who covers center screens when stunting inside. Hesitates to take out smaller running backs when attacking the passer. Length and height allows him to knock down passes at the line. Takes time to get out of two-point stance. Swipes at blocks to stay clean but does not use his hands consistently enough.

Run defense: Looks like an edge rusher but plays with good effort on the strong side of the formation. Throws body into his blocker to maintain the line. Stays with one-on-one blocks down the line and gets off to make plays, though typically performs better against tight ends/H-backs. Stunts inside regularly, holds ground fairly well considering his build and slides between blockers to attack inside runs. Could use his hands more effectively to shed.

Explosion: Inconsistent quickness off the snap, looks quick and strong at times but can be a step late and doesn't win the edge often enough to be considered an elite rusher. Strong enough punch to send tight ends into the backfield when he feels the run coming.

Strength: Tall, somewhat lean build belies good strength and effort at the point of attack. Uses leverage to hold his ground against double teams as well as can be expected. Most tight ends cannot handle him on the line but NFL tackles, however, will be able to control him with their upper-body strength if he allows them to latch on.

Tackling: Hard-working defender, makes most of his tackles fighting through blocks against the run. Willing to hustle downfield, takes deep angles to prevent big plays from resulting in scores. Goes for the strip once tackle is secured. Chases down players from behind but lacks the elite burst to close. High-cut player who may not break down quickly enough to corral NFL backs.

Intangibles: Stepped in immediately to play as a true freshman, has not missed a game due to injury in his career. Mature player who works in the weight and film rooms, and is a leader in the locker room.

NFL Comparison: Poor mans Aldon Smith - San Francisco 49's

Round 7, Pick 22: Cliff Harris, CB/KR/PR, 5-11 181

Analysis:

Man Coverage: Rarely asked to play at the line of scrimmage in press coverage, though he appears to have the quick feet and loose hips to perform well in this scheme. Very experienced in off-man coverage, demonstrating a low, tight back pedal, fluid turning motion and straight-line speed to stick with any receiver in the country. Possesses a legitimate second gear when the ball is in flight and competes for every pass.

Zone Coverage: Excellent anticipatory skills. Sneaks a peek back at the quarterback when he can and will vacate his assignment to break on underneath routes. Possessing an explosive burst downhill to close on the ball. Isn't a physical hitter who is going to intimidate anyone but has very good lateral agility to break down in space and is a reliable open field tackler.

Ball Skills: Possesses very good hands and body control for the position. Times his leaps well, has a very good vertical jump and high-points passes, showing the hand-eye-coordination normally associated with wideouts. Very good vision, agility and straight line speed for the return. To nitpick, Harris carries the ball too loosely when he has it. Muffs the occasional punt and has had the ball ripped out of his hands on returns, as well (Stanford). This would appear to be mainly a concentration issue, however, while he focusing more on making a big play rather than ball security.

Run Support: A bit inconsistent in supporting the run. More than willing to take on the back in space - including bigger ball-carriers - but is okay with his teammates doing the dirty work, as well. Good quickness, agility and aggression in slipping past receiver blocks, but can get tied up by bigger, stronger wideouts. Inconsistent effort in pursuit, though he picks it up a notch when he sees the ball-carrier has a chance for a big play. Takes good angles in pursuit when necessary.

Tackling: A surprisingly effective tackler considering that he often relies on taking the knees out from the ball-carrier. Very good body control and accuracy to strike at the legs of the ball-carrier and does a nice job of wrapping his arms to stop the bigger man. Willing to lower his shoulder and play with physicality, but isn't going to scare anyone with his hitting ability.

Intangibles: Of his eight career interceptions, four have come against Andrew Luck (two), Matt Barkley (one) and Jake Locker (one). Legitimate character red-flags. Has reportedly racked up more than $5,000 in traffic fines over the past three years stemming from various arrests for speeding, driving with a suspended license, driving without insurance, failing to stop at a stop sign and minor in possession of alcohol, among other things. Fresno County court records indicate that Harris has not held a valid driver's license for more than two years. Famously, he and a teammate (quarterback Darron Thomas) were stopped in the early morning hours of July 12 driving 118 miles per hour along Interstate 5 in a car rented by a University of Oregon employee. Found himself in more legal hot water a few months later (Oct. 24) after again being pulled over and ticketed for driving with a suspended license, no proof of insurance and for driving without wearing his seat belt. Was suspended by the team and ultimately kicked off the team for good when he arrested on November 25 for possession of marijuana.

NFL Comparison: Dre Bly - Retired

Probably has no hope of passing the Falcons filter, but if available, id take a flyer on him for sure. Oozes talent. A 7th rounder deserves a low risk/high reward pick imo

I dont think TE is much of a need this season, so this can be addressed in the next off season.

Travis Lewis is projected to go in the 5th, but i dont know if thats likely. If so, i think he'd be the steal of the draft.

I wanted to draft a 3-4 end/4-3 UT somewhere, but nobody really stuck out. If Jared Crick was to drop then id certainly entertain the idea...

Probably to long for most to read lol All analysis is from CBSSports.com

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Not bad. I don't know if we can find an OT who can step in and play at pick 55, but you never know. I think its possible that we find a TE at that position who actually could step in and make an impact. You have to think that every OC this offseason is going to entertain the idea of using TEs like the Patriots did this year. I'm hoping our FO explores that too. Then you have Tony G who is playing in his final year. If they are going to draft his replacement it needs to be THIS offseason so he can learn from Gonzo while we have him.

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Its nice to see a fan who knows it all starts with the lines, kudos for proposing a mock draft that actually addresses the real needs we have. Sanders concerns me for one reason, his limited ability to handle fast edge rushers. He sounds like more of an RT to me. Otherwise with his size and power and ability to fill out some I think he gets drafted too soon for us to consider.

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Not bad. I don't know if we can find an OT who can step in and play at pick 55, but you never know. I think its possible that we find a TE at that position who actually could step in and make an impact. You have to think that every OC this offseason is going to entertain the idea of using TEs like the Patriots did this year. I'm hoping our FO explores that too. Then you have Tony G who is playing in his final year. If they are going to draft his replacement it needs to be THIS offseason so he can learn from Gonzo while we have him.

It would be great to have the talent to draft replacements for our starters. But we have too many needs. Another TE would simply sit on the bench most the time. An LT or C would stand to see much more playing time and make a bigger difference.

Another thing...there is only one ball! Who loses carries or catches with another TE comes in to play? And we signed Douglas so really he takes the place of a second TE on the field.

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It would be great to have the talent to draft replacements for our starters. But we have too many needs. Another TE would simply sit on the bench most the time. An LT or C would stand to see much more playing time and make a bigger difference.

Another thing...there is only one ball! Who loses carries or catches with another TE comes in to play? And we signed Douglas so really he takes the place of a second TE on the field.

Agreed with the first part. We have Harvey at C so he may be our starter and there is the possibility of resigning McClure. If we choose to go C i would be ok with that because you can find Centers in the 2nd and 3rd who can start immediately. Finding a LT would be much more difficult.

Its not neccesarily about how many balls can go around. I think the benefit of having our replacement for Tony G to be on the team for a whole year playing some and learning from the best to ever play the position. I don't know if you can really put a price on how beneficial that could be.

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Not bad. I don't know if we can find an OT who can step in and play at pick 55, but you never know. I think its possible that we find a TE at that position who actually could step in and make an impact. You have to think that every OC this offseason is going to entertain the idea of using TEs like the Patriots did this year. I'm hoping our FO explores that too. Then you have Tony G who is playing in his final year. If they are going to draft his replacement it needs to be THIS offseason so he can learn from Gonzo while we have him.

I dont necessarily agree with the TE need. Running multiple TE sets just means we have WR's sitting on the bench. We just re signed Harry, and we have Julio and Roddy. We have enough pass catchers on this team already imho. Next season is going to be the time to upgrade TE.

Its nice to see a fan who knows it all starts with the lines, kudos for proposing a mock draft that actually addresses the real needs we have. Sanders concerns me for one reason, his limited ability to handle fast edge rushers. He sounds like more of an RT to me. Otherwise with his size and power and ability to fill out some I think he gets drafted too soon for us to consider.

Sanders will upgrade the OL wherever he plays as a rookie. With NFL coaching he could improve considerably with edge rushers and turn into a very good LT. Its a low risk/high reward pick imho. At worst we kick Clabo inside and have a dominating RT

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Agreed with the first part. We have Harvey at C so he may be our starter and there is the possibility of resigning McClure. If we choose to go C i would be ok with that because you can find Centers in the 2nd and 3rd who can start immediately. Finding a LT would be much more difficult.

Its not neccesarily about how many balls can go around. I think the benefit of having our replacement for Tony G to be on the team for a whole year playing some and learning from the best to ever play the position. I don't know if you can really put a price on how beneficial that could be.

Having a rookie TE being exposed to TG certainly cannot hurt, it would be hugely beneficial.

However TD cannot afford to draft a student TE while ignoring other positions where we need starters or big-time contributors is what I am saying.

Edited by egoprime II
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Sanders is not the answer. Ta'amu won't last nearly that long. I don't think he makes it past round 1...

Sanders is going to pull a Baker unless he goes to a ZBS. But I do love Ta'amu and think he should be one of the options at #55. He isn't a first rounder though luckily so he should be there.

To the OP's point, the reason the Lions resigned Backus is because continuity on the OLine is important and if you have a chance to bring your guy back vs another guy, you always bring yours back. Look how losing Dahl hurt us and he wasn't even that good to the point that should have happened.

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I dont think we'll sign Marcus McNeill as i think his degenerative neck issues will scare off the Falcons FO just as they did Detroit. I cant help thinking as to why Detroit would rather sign a 34 year old compared to a 28 year old to play left tackle for them. Who would you rather if both completely healthy?? Begs the question...

Round 2, Pick 23: Zebrie Sanders, OT, 6-5 307

Analysis:

Pass Blocking - Footwork and technique are usually very good. Has a balanced and agile pass protection set that handles all motions effectively. Hand placement is excellent. The one concern is handling the super quick edge rusher. Foot speed and quickness are very good, but not elite. Has the power and bend needed to anchor against the bull rush. Sometimes will attempt to punch too soon, lunge, and fail to transfer power properly as a result.

Run Blocking - Has the ability to sink hips and generate real power with strong hands. Consistently moves defenders back. Grades out extremely well in every aspect of run blocking.

Pulling/Trapping - Outstanding blocking ability on the move. Would grade highly as an OG prospect as well. Agility is very good and power is excellent. Puts a lot of defenders on the ground. Stays low and uses excellent technique.

Initial Quickness - Is usually very good in this area. Fires off the snap and gets push on run plays. First step is quick when pulling. Is rarely beaten off the snap by pass rushers. As with all OTs, crowd noise can limit ability to hear QB.

Downfield - Is athletic and can run, plant, seal, sink hips, and deliver powerful blocks where the play dictates. Consistently makes quality second level blocks.

Intangibles - About the highest possible grade here. Smart, durable, healthy, experienced, and high character. The demonstrated ability to switch from ORT to OLT without any problems is perhaps the best tribute to this prospect's intangibles.

NFL Comparison: Trent Williams - Washington Redskins

Round 3, Pick 22: Alameda Ta'amu, DT, 6-3 348

Analysis:

Pass rush: Surprising initial quickness off the snap. Wide-bodied frame makes it difficult for him to split gaps, but shows a burst when he has a lane. Developing swim move. Relies mostly on a simple bull rush at this point, which is quite effective in collapsing the pocket. Only phone booth quickness. Gives good effort in chasing down the quarterback, but tires quickly.

Run defense: Strong, stout interior presence who often requires double-team blocks to keep him from clogging running lanes. Short, thick legs and thick trunk which aid him in anchoring. Inconsistent in his effort pursuing laterally and downfield, but surprises opponents with his quickness for such a large man. Short arms could lead to problems against NFL-caliber offensive linemen with longer arms able to get into his chest …

Explosion: Flashes an explosive initial burst off the snap to split gaps, especially when guards vacate the hole to pull. Has the upper body strength to rock his opponent back onto his heels. Quicker and more athletic than his body would lead you to believe, flashing startling explosiveness as a tackler when he gains momentum.

Strength: Powerful man who often requires double-teams. Excellent strength in his upper and lower, though his short limbs limit his effectiveness, at times. Relies heavily on his bull rush to pressure the quarterback. Often is at his most effective as a run-stuffer by simply creating a pile in the middle due to his ability to anchor.

Tackling: Makes most of his tackles by simpyl bludgeoning the ball-carrier. Lacks the quick-twitch muscles and lateral agility to break down in space, but has such great strength that he often is able to grab the ball-carrier with one arm, slow his momentum and grab on with his other arm to pull the ball-carrier to the ground. Inconsistent effort in pursuit, but generates impressive momentum when he's moving at full-speed and can rock the ball-carrier with an explosive hit.

Intangibles: Struggled with his weight early in his career. Has weighed as much as 390 pounds and played at 360, at times. Committed himself to extra conditioning and taking rice -- a staple of the Samoan culture -- out of his diet. He weighed in at 337 pounds for the 2011 Holiday Bowl. Suffered a broken foot during his senior year of high school.

NFL Comparison: Terrance Cody - Baltimore Ravens

Round 5, Pick 22: Travis Lewis, OLB, 6-1 246

Analysis:

Read & React: Combines very good instincts with above-average reaction skills. Almost always finds the ball in traffic. Greet feel in coverage, sees quarterback and receiver, jumps routes to prevent completion, or at least stop yards after the catch. One-man wrecking crew against screens because he sniffs them out and has the quickness to grab the receiver.

Run defense: Tougher between the tackles than many expect. Gap-shooter that grabs backs before they get through the line, also willing to throw his body into the hole to create piles and stands up to blocks to stay in the play. Feels pulling lineman coming, capable of punching to stay clean or take the outside shoulder to keep runners from bouncing to the sideline. Lacks strength to blow up fullbacks and bulk/length to prevent getting engulfed by better lineman at the second level.

Pass defense: Fluid and quick drop into zone, covers enough ground to be Tampa-Two mike and knows where the markers are. Often arrives at the receiver at the same time as the ball, gives up few yards after the catch. Possesses straight-line speed stay with or chase down receivers in man. Creates turnovers with quick reaction time to bring in tipped balls, closes on balls over the middle or baits quarterbacks intro throwing his directions if they do not seeing his deep drop. Loses size battle to many tight ends, easily pushed away on out routes. Caught looking into backfield occasionally instead of getting to receiver in the flat. Tries to cradle throws at times instead of snatching them, resulting in dropped interceptions.

Tackling: As secure and reliable a tackler as you'll see in college football. Not necessarily explosive, but more physical than a chase-and-drag linebacker. Breaks down well in space, corrals elusive ballcarriers on the edge or inside by wrapping torso and holding on. Gets leverage inside to stop piles from moving forward. Leaves his feet at times, NFL backs will take advantage.

Pass Rush/Blitz: Works more in space than attacking the backfield, but flashes closing speed and agility to reach passers from the blind side or up the middle before they can escape. Knocks down some quarterbacks with just a glancing blow. Takes advantage of large holes to get to the quarterback, but must work on using violent hands to rip off lineman and defeat cut blocks from running backs. Also needs to build a variety of pass rush moves.

Intangibles: Team captain who leads the team on and off the field with words and by example. Four-year starter for one of the top programs in the country. No known character or off-field issues.

NFL Comparison: Lance Briggs - Chicago Bears

Round 6, Pick 23: Jacquies Smith, DE/OLB, 6-3 255

Analysis:

Pass rush: Flashes a quick first step when allowed to get after the passer. Moved inside on third downs to pressure interior linemen, works hard to get through doubles to chase the passer. Smart player who covers center screens when stunting inside. Hesitates to take out smaller running backs when attacking the passer. Length and height allows him to knock down passes at the line. Takes time to get out of two-point stance. Swipes at blocks to stay clean but does not use his hands consistently enough.

Run defense: Looks like an edge rusher but plays with good effort on the strong side of the formation. Throws body into his blocker to maintain the line. Stays with one-on-one blocks down the line and gets off to make plays, though typically performs better against tight ends/H-backs. Stunts inside regularly, holds ground fairly well considering his build and slides between blockers to attack inside runs. Could use his hands more effectively to shed.

Explosion: Inconsistent quickness off the snap, looks quick and strong at times but can be a step late and doesn't win the edge often enough to be considered an elite rusher. Strong enough punch to send tight ends into the backfield when he feels the run coming.

Strength: Tall, somewhat lean build belies good strength and effort at the point of attack. Uses leverage to hold his ground against double teams as well as can be expected. Most tight ends cannot handle him on the line but NFL tackles, however, will be able to control him with their upper-body strength if he allows them to latch on.

Tackling: Hard-working defender, makes most of his tackles fighting through blocks against the run. Willing to hustle downfield, takes deep angles to prevent big plays from resulting in scores. Goes for the strip once tackle is secured. Chases down players from behind but lacks the elite burst to close. High-cut player who may not break down quickly enough to corral NFL backs.

Intangibles: Stepped in immediately to play as a true freshman, has not missed a game due to injury in his career. Mature player who works in the weight and film rooms, and is a leader in the locker room.

NFL Comparison: Poor mans Aldon Smith - San Francisco 49's

Round 7, Pick 22: Cliff Harris, CB/KR/PR, 5-11 181

Analysis:

Man Coverage: Rarely asked to play at the line of scrimmage in press coverage, though he appears to have the quick feet and loose hips to perform well in this scheme. Very experienced in off-man coverage, demonstrating a low, tight back pedal, fluid turning motion and straight-line speed to stick with any receiver in the country. Possesses a legitimate second gear when the ball is in flight and competes for every pass.

Zone Coverage: Excellent anticipatory skills. Sneaks a peek back at the quarterback when he can and will vacate his assignment to break on underneath routes. Possessing an explosive burst downhill to close on the ball. Isn't a physical hitter who is going to intimidate anyone but has very good lateral agility to break down in space and is a reliable open field tackler.

Ball Skills: Possesses very good hands and body control for the position. Times his leaps well, has a very good vertical jump and high-points passes, showing the hand-eye-coordination normally associated with wideouts. Very good vision, agility and straight line speed for the return. To nitpick, Harris carries the ball too loosely when he has it. Muffs the occasional punt and has had the ball ripped out of his hands on returns, as well (Stanford). This would appear to be mainly a concentration issue, however, while he focusing more on making a big play rather than ball security.

Run Support: A bit inconsistent in supporting the run. More than willing to take on the back in space - including bigger ball-carriers - but is okay with his teammates doing the dirty work, as well. Good quickness, agility and aggression in slipping past receiver blocks, but can get tied up by bigger, stronger wideouts. Inconsistent effort in pursuit, though he picks it up a notch when he sees the ball-carrier has a chance for a big play. Takes good angles in pursuit when necessary.

Tackling: A surprisingly effective tackler considering that he often relies on taking the knees out from the ball-carrier. Very good body control and accuracy to strike at the legs of the ball-carrier and does a nice job of wrapping his arms to stop the bigger man. Willing to lower his shoulder and play with physicality, but isn't going to scare anyone with his hitting ability.

Intangibles: Of his eight career interceptions, four have come against Andrew Luck (two), Matt Barkley (one) and Jake Locker (one). Legitimate character red-flags. Has reportedly racked up more than $5,000 in traffic fines over the past three years stemming from various arrests for speeding, driving with a suspended license, driving without insurance, failing to stop at a stop sign and minor in possession of alcohol, among other things. Fresno County court records indicate that Harris has not held a valid driver's license for more than two years. Famously, he and a teammate (quarterback Darron Thomas) were stopped in the early morning hours of July 12 driving 118 miles per hour along Interstate 5 in a car rented by a University of Oregon employee. Found himself in more legal hot water a few months later (Oct. 24) after again being pulled over and ticketed for driving with a suspended license, no proof of insurance and for driving without wearing his seat belt. Was suspended by the team and ultimately kicked off the team for good when he arrested on November 25 for possession of marijuana.

NFL Comparison: Dre Bly - Retired

Probably has no hope of passing the Falcons filter, but if available, id take a flyer on him for sure. Oozes talent. A 7th rounder deserves a low risk/high reward pick imo

I dont think TE is much of a need this season, so this can be addressed in the next off season.

Travis Lewis is projected to go in the 5th, but i dont know if thats likely. If so, i think he'd be the steal of the draft.

I wanted to draft a 3-4 end/4-3 UT somewhere, but nobody really stuck out. If Jared Crick was to drop then id certainly entertain the idea...

Probably to long for most to read lol All analysis is from CBSSports.com

That's a great mock! The only one that might not happen--and you probably know this as well--is the Sanders pick. The reason i say this is not due to his ability, or where HE SHOULD BE DRAFTED (which you probably have him slotted right); it's the position. OTs tend to get drafted early --actually overdrafted--and often. Remember Sam Baker? But, overall, outstanding mock.

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Sanders is going to pull a Baker unless he goes to a ZBS. But I do love Ta'amu and think he should be one of the options at #55. He isn't a first rounder though luckily so he should be there.

To the OP's point, the reason the Lions resigned Backus is because continuity on the OLine is important and if you have a chance to bring your guy back vs another guy, you always bring yours back. Look how losing Dahl hurt us and he wasn't even that good to the point that should have happened.

I'm not certain he gets past Pittsburgh and I definitely don't see him being there at our pick. Losing Dahl wasn't what hurt us, it was opening up the offense to expose our weaknesses that hurt us IMO.

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I'm not certain he gets past Pittsburgh and I definitely don't see him being there at our pick. Losing Dahl wasn't what hurt us, it was opening up the offense to expose our weaknesses that hurt us IMO.

Alameda isn't a first rounder so that would be a major reach for them to get him before us in that scenario.

I wasn't saying Dahl was the only reason that hurt us. But if we had Dahl, I would bet my bottom dollar the OLine wouldn't have been THAT bad. That's what I was saying.

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Sanders is going to pull a Baker unless he goes to a ZBS. But I do love Ta'amu and think he should be one of the options at #55. He isn't a first rounder though luckily so he should be there.

To the OP's point, the reason the Lions resigned Backus is because continuity on the OLine is important and if you have a chance to bring your guy back vs another guy, you always bring yours back. Look how losing Dahl hurt us and he wasn't even that good to the point that should have happened.

Continuity has its advantages, but there is more of an advantage in getting service out of a 28 year old LT for 7 years compared to a 34 year old for 2, especially with a QB going into his 4th year. I see the window being open for Detroit for the next 3-4 years, not 1-2...

Im glad Dahl left as it really exposed our OL for what it was. Subpar, but it wasnt just the fact Dahl left, it was the fact we had crappy play at LT and no push up the middle when we really needed it.

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Alameda isn't a first rounder so that would be a major reach for them to get him before us in that scenario.

I wasn't saying Dahl was the only reason that hurt us. But if we had Dahl, I would bet my bottom dollar the OLine wouldn't have been THAT bad. That's what I was saying.

I dunno, I've seen quite a few mocks that had him going late first, early second.

Dahl wasn't a very good pass blocker either and we weren't getting push on short yardage when he was here so I can't see it really making much of a difference. The biggest difference will be Hawley at center (at least in short yardage situations)...

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Having a rookie TE being exposed to TG certainly cannot hurt, it would be hugely beneficial.

However TD cannot afford to draft a student TE while ignoring other positions where we need starters or big-time contributors is what I am saying.

Thats why it will come down to can we find a starter at pick 55. At OT i highly doubt it. At C I think we have a good shot, but we have Hawley and could even resign McClure. I don't know how high the FO is on Hawley. If we drafted a TE with our first pick that wouldn't be ignoring other positions and wouldn't be drafting him to purely be a student and ride the bench all year.

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