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I'd like to ask Coach exactly how bad does the offensive situation have to get before he swallows his pride and admits that what Mike Mularkey is doing for an offensive gameplan is no longer working? And that Sam Baker and Reynolds aren't exactly getting the job done at their prospective positions on the o-line?

I'd also like to ask him why does it take us spotting the opposing team 10 points before we make major decisions, such as going to the no-huddle or Matt calling his own plays?

I know I don't know everything that's going on behind the scenes to make an informed judgment, but one cannot ignore what's been going on for the past year and a half. I figure either Smitty wants to give his coordinators a chance to do better. I just hope it's not an ego thing with him in that he's just going to roll with what he has due to not wanting to admit he was wrong in choosing his personnel.

Exactly what is it going to take? Matt going down with an injury before he finally wakes up and cans Mike Mularkey? Or realizes that Baker peaked last year or that Reynolds (a converted T) isn't a G?

To his credit, BVG has stepped up his game and has done pretty well calling the plays at DC the past two games. Mike Mularkey, unfortunately, hasn't changed a bit. He's still predictable as ever and shows no signs at changing his gameplan, which is the same style that got him fired at Buffalo and Pittsburgh.

Wake up, coach.

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Pat Y. made a comment in his summary on the NFC South Blog that pretty much sums in up for me.

Pharaphrasing his comments as best I can recall.

What I didn't like: "For the second game in a row the Falcons went to the hurry up offense in the 4th quarter. For the second week in a row they got good results. Why not use it more?"

A friend at work comment that Ryan's problem was that he was a 4th quarter QB, and 15 minutes isn't enough in the NFL. I'm not sure Ryan is the critical varible in the 4th quarter. I honestly believe he is just a better play caller than the guy sending them in for the first 3 quarters.

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The thing we have to realize is that nothing is going to change midseason.  It may be that he and Blank have already discussed it (at least I'm hoping so).  I'm one of the last ones probably on the fire Mularkey bandwagon but I'm fully on board now...

I can fully understand not firing MM right now, but I can see no reason to keep rolling with Baker at LT and not bring someone in that can do a better job. Give Svitek or Valdez a shot. Either way Baker should get benched.
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^^This!

Not his style to call out players and staff to the media but some folks need to be getting torn a new one in Flowery Branch right now.

I wonder if demoting a player to the bench qualifies as "calling a player out"? For Matt's health and the sake of our offense, I sure hope not.
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I'm just not seeing any swagger from this team at all however I know it's early but I think now is the time before we have a snowball effect. Main problems to fix right now is definitely our O-line situation and Offensive Coordinator. We seem to be more in sync when Matt calls the plays and I can only imagine that after you review game film the next day the light bulb has to come on in coach smitty's head and say maybe MM is holding us back and my o-line looks a mess right now but I'm just saying!!!

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Pat Y. made a comment in his summary on the NFC South Blog that pretty much sums in up for me.

Pharaphrasing his comments as best I can recall.

What I didn't like: "For the second game in a row the Falcons went to the hurry up offense in the 4th quarter. For the second week in a row they got good results. Why not use it more?"

A friend at work comment that Ryan's problem was that he was a 4th quarter QB, and 15 minutes isn't enough in the NFL. I'm not sure Ryan is the critical varible in the 4th quarter. I honestly believe he is just a better play caller than the guy sending them in for the first 3 quarters.

The real question isn't why we aren't using the no-huddle more, but rather why we are forced to use it at all if we want to score points? An offense like this should not be held down during 3 quarters of an entire ballgame. Especially not knowing that Mularkey and company are putting in a gameplan every week, that just comes out flat and ineffective when implemented on the field on sundays.. Since we can't score with our regular offense, there must be something terribly terribly wrong! Since we can score when Matt is calling the plays but not when Mularkey is, I'm willing to bet that it's Mularkey who's the real problem!

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I pulled this from a Steelers forum. I wish I knew if the OP wrote this or if its from an article. Either way, it says a lot about our OC.

"Originally touted as an offensive genius at the beginning of this decade, Mike Mularkey has rightfully lost that moniker and is approaching "bust" status as a coach.

By examining his track record one thing becomes clear. If past events predict future results, the Atlanta Falcons are in trouble offensively.

Mike Mularkey first became offensive coordinator in 2001 for the Pittsburgh Steelers. He was promoted from tights ends coach and replaced Kevin Gilbride and had his best statistical year as a coach. The Pittsburgh Steelers were ranked 3rd offensively in his first year as offensive coordinator and made the playoffs.

They were ranked 18th the previous year.

The following year, 2002, the Steelers were still excellent offensively, but slipped a bit to 5th. In 2003, the Steelers entered a free fall offensively and dropped all the way to 22nd, missing the playoffs. Mularkey began to be characterized as a coach that used predictable formations and was way too quick to abandon the run. He became reliant on the gimmick or trick play as opposed to sound play calling.

Mularkey still had a great deal of buzz and was touted as one of the up and coming new coaches in spite of the Pittsburgh offensive rankings and not making the playoffs in 2003.

He used that buzz to land the head coaching job in Buffalo, with the Bills. He replaced the fired Gregg Williams, after Williams posted back-to-back 5-11 seasons. His first year as coach in 2004, the Bills after an 0-4 start, reeled off six straight wins and finished just out of the playoffs at 9-7 after getting beat by Mularkey's former team, the Pittsburgh Steelers back ups in week 17.

The offense for the year ended up ranked 25th up from the previous years ranking of 30th. The offensive coordinator the year before Mularkey got there?

Kevin Gilbride.

So, in the two instances in his career where Mularkey raised an offense's ranking statistically, it was done in his first year as coach and he was replacing Gilbride both times.

In 2005, the Bills dropped offensively from 25th to 28th and his handling and development of JP Losman as the quarterback to replace Drew Bledsoe is laughable at best.

Ask any Bills fan about how they feel about the job Mularkey did with Losman, and you will get an answer that will most likely force you to ask small children to leave the room to spare them the obscenity laced tirade.

Mularkey waffled back and forth and sat Losman in favor of journeyman Kelly Holcomb. Citing differences with the direction of the Bills after team President and General Manager, Tom Donahoe was fired, Mularkey quit the Bills before the start of 2006 season.

In 2006, Mularkey landed in Miami as offensive coordinator and the Dolphins promptly dropped from 14th to 20th in offensive rankings. Mularkey did not have the luxury of replacing Kevin Gilbride to inflate his first year numbers. He was then demoted to tight ends coach in 2007 before being fired at the end of the season.

For the 2008 season, Mularkey has been tapped as the offensive coordinator in Atlanta. Entering a team in disarray for the third time in a row, a team in Atlanta that has not enjoyed back to back winning seasons in its history, Mike Mularkey does not bode well for Falcons fans to reverse that trend. His first example of success, in Pittsburgh, can be attributed in large part to the stability of the organization, stability of the coaching staff, and the offensive coordinator he replaced as opposed to his measure of ability to game plan successfully.

In Buffalo, his pattern of success is very similar, a brief one year rise followed by a precipitous fall after replacing Kevin Gilbride.

His time in Miami can be only characterized as a disaster at best. One of the marks of an effective coach is the ability to say yes to the question, "Did you leave the situation in better shape than when you found it?" In each case of his head coaching or offensive coordinator stops Mike Mularkey cannot say "yes" to that question.

Simply put, Mularkey is not the answer for the Falcons.

He has not demonstrated an ability to develop rookie quarterbacks and he has never developed the team around him to be better consistently for more than one season. He has never improved a team offensively from year one to year two. So, Atlanta fans may find themselves doing better this year offensively, and after the debacle of Bobby Petrino it is hard to imagine them worse, only to begin to regress again in 2009. That is, if he doesn't follow the pattern of his last stop in Miami where the offense got instantly worse. Who was his starting quarterback in Miami?

Joey Harrington, the same quarterback as in Atlanta.

Perhaps Mularkey will learn from his past mistakes and get something out of Joey Harrington and not develop Matt Ryan like he did JP Losman, because right now things are looking eerily similar to his past situations and that does not bode well long-term for Falcons fans.And this was posted in 2006!

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I'd like to ask Coach exactly how bad does the offensive situation have to get before he swallows his pride and admits that what Mike Mularkey is doing for an offensive gameplan is no longer working? And that Sam Baker and Reynolds aren't exactly getting the job done at their prospective positions on the o-line?

I'd also like to ask him why does it take us spotting the opposing team 10 points before we make major decisions, such as going to the no-huddle or Matt calling his own plays?

I know I don't know everything that's going on behind the scenes to make an informed judgment, but one cannot ignore what's been going on for the past year and a half. I figure either Smitty wants to give his coordinators a chance to do better. I just hope it's not an ego thing with him in that he's just going to roll with what he has due to not wanting to admit he was wrong in choosing his personnel.

Exactly what is it going to take? Matt going down with an injury before he finally wakes up and cans Mike Mularkey? Or realizes that Baker peaked last year or that Reynolds (a converted T) isn't a G?

To his credit, BVG has stepped up his game and has done pretty well calling the plays at DC the past two games. Mike Mularkey, unfortunately, hasn't changed a bit. He's still predictable as ever and shows no signs at changing his gameplan, which is the same style that got him fired at Buffalo and Pittsburgh.

Wake up, coach.

Agree with everything you posted. It's almost like they treat the no huddle as our "not so secret" weapon and they bring it out when we are too far behind or after we have let too much of the game go by just sputtering along.

Run it from start to finish or go no huddle in the middle of a possession when you get a favorable match-up with your opponent. If you think the guys can't do it all game due to conditioning then get in better shape or mix in some "traditional offense" for 2 or 3 possessions. The majority of time should be in the no huddle

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I pulled this from a Steelers forum. I wish I knew if the OP wrote this or if its from an article. Either way, it says a lot about our OC.

"Originally touted as an offensive genius at the beginning of this decade, Mike Mularkey has rightfully lost that moniker and is approaching "bust" status as a coach.

By examining his track record one thing becomes clear. If past events predict future results, the Atlanta Falcons are in trouble offensively.

Mike Mularkey first became offensive coordinator in 2001 for the Pittsburgh Steelers. He was promoted from tights ends coach and replaced Kevin Gilbride and had his best statistical year as a coach. The Pittsburgh Steelers were ranked 3rd offensively in his first year as offensive coordinator and made the playoffs.

They were ranked 18th the previous year.

The following year, 2002, the Steelers were still excellent offensively, but slipped a bit to 5th. In 2003, the Steelers entered a free fall offensively and dropped all the way to 22nd, missing the playoffs. Mularkey began to be characterized as a coach that used predictable formations and was way too quick to abandon the run. He became reliant on the gimmick or trick play as opposed to sound play calling.

Mularkey still had a great deal of buzz and was touted as one of the up and coming new coaches in spite of the Pittsburgh offensive rankings and not making the playoffs in 2003.

He used that buzz to land the head coaching job in Buffalo, with the Bills. He replaced the fired Gregg Williams, after Williams posted back-to-back 5-11 seasons. His first year as coach in 2004, the Bills after an 0-4 start, reeled off six straight wins and finished just out of the playoffs at 9-7 after getting beat by Mularkey's former team, the Pittsburgh Steelers back ups in week 17.

The offense for the year ended up ranked 25th up from the previous years ranking of 30th. The offensive coordinator the year before Mularkey got there?

Kevin Gilbride.

So, in the two instances in his career where Mularkey raised an offense's ranking statistically, it was done in his first year as coach and he was replacing Gilbride both times.

In 2005, the Bills dropped offensively from 25th to 28th and his handling and development of JP Losman as the quarterback to replace Drew Bledsoe is laughable at best.

Ask any Bills fan about how they feel about the job Mularkey did with Losman, and you will get an answer that will most likely force you to ask small children to leave the room to spare them the obscenity laced tirade.

Mularkey waffled back and forth and sat Losman in favor of journeyman Kelly Holcomb. Citing differences with the direction of the Bills after team President and General Manager, Tom Donahoe was fired, Mularkey quit the Bills before the start of 2006 season.

In 2006, Mularkey landed in Miami as offensive coordinator and the Dolphins promptly dropped from 14th to 20th in offensive rankings. Mularkey did not have the luxury of replacing Kevin Gilbride to inflate his first year numbers. He was then demoted to tight ends coach in 2007 before being fired at the end of the season.

For the 2008 season, Mularkey has been tapped as the offensive coordinator in Atlanta. Entering a team in disarray for the third time in a row, a team in Atlanta that has not enjoyed back to back winning seasons in its history, Mike Mularkey does not bode well for Falcons fans to reverse that trend. His first example of success, in Pittsburgh, can be attributed in large part to the stability of the organization, stability of the coaching staff, and the offensive coordinator he replaced as opposed to his measure of ability to game plan successfully.

In Buffalo, his pattern of success is very similar, a brief one year rise followed by a precipitous fall after replacing Kevin Gilbride.

His time in Miami can be only characterized as a disaster at best. One of the marks of an effective coach is the ability to say yes to the question, "Did you leave the situation in better shape than when you found it?" In each case of his head coaching or offensive coordinator stops Mike Mularkey cannot say "yes" to that question.

Simply put, Mularkey is not the answer for the Falcons.

He has not demonstrated an ability to develop rookie quarterbacks and he has never developed the team around him to be better consistently for more than one season. He has never improved a team offensively from year one to year two. So, Atlanta fans may find themselves doing better this year offensively, and after the debacle of Bobby Petrino it is hard to imagine them worse, only to begin to regress again in 2009. That is, if he doesn't follow the pattern of his last stop in Miami where the offense got instantly worse. Who was his starting quarterback in Miami?

Joey Harrington, the same quarterback as in Atlanta.

Perhaps Mularkey will learn from his past mistakes and get something out of Joey Harrington and not develop Matt Ryan like he did JP Losman, because right now things are looking eerily similar to his past situations and that does not bode well long-term for Falcons fans.And this was posted in 2006!

Urrrghhhhhhhhh.............

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I pulled this from a Steelers forum. I wish I knew if the OP wrote this or if its from an article. Either way, it says a lot about our OC.

"Originally touted as an offensive genius at the beginning of this decade, Mike Mularkey has rightfully lost that moniker and is approaching "bust" status as a coach.

By examining his track record one thing becomes clear. If past events predict future results, the Atlanta Falcons are in trouble offensively.

Mike Mularkey first became offensive coordinator in 2001 for the Pittsburgh Steelers. He was promoted from tights ends coach and replaced Kevin Gilbride and had his best statistical year as a coach. The Pittsburgh Steelers were ranked 3rd offensively in his first year as offensive coordinator and made the playoffs.

They were ranked 18th the previous year.

The following year, 2002, the Steelers were still excellent offensively, but slipped a bit to 5th. In 2003, the Steelers entered a free fall offensively and dropped all the way to 22nd, missing the playoffs. Mularkey began to be characterized as a coach that used predictable formations and was way too quick to abandon the run. He became reliant on the gimmick or trick play as opposed to sound play calling.

Mularkey still had a great deal of buzz and was touted as one of the up and coming new coaches in spite of the Pittsburgh offensive rankings and not making the playoffs in 2003.

He used that buzz to land the head coaching job in Buffalo, with the Bills. He replaced the fired Gregg Williams, after Williams posted back-to-back 5-11 seasons. His first year as coach in 2004, the Bills after an 0-4 start, reeled off six straight wins and finished just out of the playoffs at 9-7 after getting beat by Mularkey's former team, the Pittsburgh Steelers back ups in week 17.

The offense for the year ended up ranked 25th up from the previous years ranking of 30th. The offensive coordinator the year before Mularkey got there?

Kevin Gilbride.

So, in the two instances in his career where Mularkey raised an offense's ranking statistically, it was done in his first year as coach and he was replacing Gilbride both times.

In 2005, the Bills dropped offensively from 25th to 28th and his handling and development of JP Losman as the quarterback to replace Drew Bledsoe is laughable at best.

Ask any Bills fan about how they feel about the job Mularkey did with Losman, and you will get an answer that will most likely force you to ask small children to leave the room to spare them the obscenity laced tirade.

Mularkey waffled back and forth and sat Losman in favor of journeyman Kelly Holcomb. Citing differences with the direction of the Bills after team President and General Manager, Tom Donahoe was fired, Mularkey quit the Bills before the start of 2006 season.

In 2006, Mularkey landed in Miami as offensive coordinator and the Dolphins promptly dropped from 14th to 20th in offensive rankings. Mularkey did not have the luxury of replacing Kevin Gilbride to inflate his first year numbers. He was then demoted to tight ends coach in 2007 before being fired at the end of the season.

For the 2008 season, Mularkey has been tapped as the offensive coordinator in Atlanta. Entering a team in disarray for the third time in a row, a team in Atlanta that has not enjoyed back to back winning seasons in its history, Mike Mularkey does not bode well for Falcons fans to reverse that trend. His first example of success, in Pittsburgh, can be attributed in large part to the stability of the organization, stability of the coaching staff, and the offensive coordinator he replaced as opposed to his measure of ability to game plan successfully.

In Buffalo, his pattern of success is very similar, a brief one year rise followed by a precipitous fall after replacing Kevin Gilbride.

His time in Miami can be only characterized as a disaster at best. One of the marks of an effective coach is the ability to say yes to the question, "Did you leave the situation in better shape than when you found it?" In each case of his head coaching or offensive coordinator stops Mike Mularkey cannot say "yes" to that question.

Simply put, Mularkey is not the answer for the Falcons.

He has not demonstrated an ability to develop rookie quarterbacks and he has never developed the team around him to be better consistently for more than one season. He has never improved a team offensively from year one to year two. So, Atlanta fans may find themselves doing better this year offensively, and after the debacle of Bobby Petrino it is hard to imagine them worse, only to begin to regress again in 2009. That is, if he doesn't follow the pattern of his last stop in Miami where the offense got instantly worse. Who was his starting quarterback in Miami?

Joey Harrington, the same quarterback as in Atlanta.

Perhaps Mularkey will learn from his past mistakes and get something out of Joey Harrington and not develop Matt Ryan like he did JP Losman, because right now things are looking eerily similar to his past situations and that does not bode well long-term for Falcons fans.And this was posted in 2006!

Thanks for this concise report, that I feel is spot on. It also reflects on Mike Smith's judgement in choosing Mularkey. This team sorely needs an innovative OC. And especially one who can adjust to what defenses are trying to do.

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They should break out Svitek and Valdez vs. Seattle ........this sheet can not get much worse , time for radical change on that O - line, or it will be same ole same ole ........

Valdez would play his A..off. He is trying desperately to make a 53 man roster. I wish someone would let this dude have a shot he would play so hard.

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Valdez would play his A..off. He is trying desperately to make a 53 man roster. I wish someone would let this dude have a shot he would play so hard.

I would plug him in Reynolds spot right now, Reynolds may be the worst starting NFL lineman I have ever seen .....and Svitek filed in pretty good for Baker when he was hurt, why not just try it ? ........

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