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I have been on a kick of going back and re-reading a lot of classic books that I have not read in a good while, since childhood or teens to be exact.

stuff recently read... Ben Hur, The robe, Lord of The Flies and Just tonight I finished To Kill a Mockingbird, which was brilliant of course.I started reading it three days ago and it's a quick read because it seemed so familiar, like a slice of my own small town life growing up.

Next on my list is Last of the Mohicans I think. I found a cache of about ten from Readers digest worlds best reading series at Goodwill for 2 bucks a pop. These are beautiful books and are not condensed, they are full novels. I think there are 100+ in the series and I have now made it my next collection to hunt down. Some, like the romances and such I may never read, but I will read or reread most of them.

Basically I just want to sit in front of a shelf of all these books and look like this

The-English-Gentleman-by-Monocle.jpeg

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Revisiting some of the literary classics. Barnes and Noble has most of the classics priced at 6.95 which is a bargain. Right now I'm reading Washington Irving's works. Interesting thing I found out recently about "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow"- most of the characters names in the story can be found in the old Sleepy Hollow graveyard right down to a Hessian soldier from the Revolutionary War who supposedly lost his head due to a cannon ball.

1593082258.jpg

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Currently reading "A Helmet for My Pillow" by Robert Leckie. Just finished "With the Old Breed: At Pelelui and Okinowa" by E.B. Sledge. (which was absolutely fantastic btw)

Been on a WWII kick lately.

With the Old Breed

A Helmet for My Pillow

With the Old Breed along with The Forgotten Soldier are the greatest soldier narratives on that describe unflinchingly the **** that is war. Highly recommend both. It should be required reading for those that make decision to send men off to war.

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With the Old Breed along with The Forgotten Soldier are the greatest soldier narratives on that describe unflinchingly the **** that is war. Highly recommend both. It should be required reading for those that make decision to send men off to war.

Haven't read The Forgotten Soldier but I will now. Thanks!

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In a time of great economic downturn, the US Senate, in thrall to an evil leftist president, ratifies the UN Global Gun Ban Treaty. Congress passes implementing legislation and an aggressive enforcement effort is launched. There are those in Wyoming who decide not to comply with the new laws. The old ways suit them just fine, and they are willing to take whatever measures are necessary to preserve their traditional lifestyle. They have no intention of letting themselves become prey to the predatory treaty enforcers. This is their story. ********** About the Author: Mark Spungin is a retired US Army Master Sergeant. He spent three years in the Regular Army and thirty years in the Wyoming Army National Guard. A Viet-Nam veteran, he served as a rifleman with B 1/7 Cavalry in 1966. In the Wyoming Guard he served as an engineer, a medic, and his last five years as State Marksmanship Coordinator. In civilian life, he worked as a truck driver, hard-rock miner, and Registered Nurse. A competitive shooter, Mark is a Distinguished Rifleman, Distinguished Pistol shot, and earned the National Guard Chief's Fifty Badge. Mark currently serves as president of the Wyoming State Shooting Association (WSSA).

LOL!!

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The Path to Compassion: Writings on Socially Engaged Buddhism

http://www.amazon.com/Path-Compassion-Writings-Socially-Buddhism/dp/0938077023

One of the difficulties I often have with yoga and Buddhism is that they often feel incompatible with 2011 American life. This book seems to be addressing that in one way or another.

I knew you were a closet theocrat :P

Seriously, sounds like an interesting book.

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Last year I reread Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness. With memories of slugging through it in High School without much enjoyment, I was surprised how I liked it this time around.

Earlier this year I started reading Rudyard Kipling's Jungle Book to my 4 year old. It was a novel idea in my mind, but without pictures or an appreciation of literary detail, it didn't quite fit the bill over the condensed Disney version, at least to a 4 year old. Anyway, I ended up finishing it, and it's actually a good read. Going back and telling the condensed story of Rikki-Tikki-Tavi was a big hit with my son.

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