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JHav

HBO: Game of Thrones

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Except Arya Stark

becomes nothing but a mindless murderer. Everything her character has been leading to is completely wiped away when she kills a man who did no wrong to her or her family. Twice. She spends the majority of her arc praying for the deaths of people that have wronged her or people she loves, and then just ends up murdering some guy who broke a vow to the Night's Watch, who she's not a member of and has no justification for killing, followed by some guy that sells insurance for ships. She becomes the very thing that she's spent the entire time praying against. She essentially becomes nothing.
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Except Arya Stark

becomes nothing but a mindless murderer. Everything her character has been leading to is completely wiped away when she kills a man who did no wrong to her or her family. Twice. She spends the majority of her arc praying for the deaths of people that have wronged her or people she loves, and then just ends up murdering some guy who broke a vow to the Night's Watch, who she's not a member of and has no justification for killing, followed by some guy that sells insurance for ships. She becomes the very thing that she's spent the entire time praying against. She essentially becomes nothing.

As much training as she's getting she better be godd@mn Neo by the time the seven book rolls around.

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"A big influence was Joaquin Phoenix in Gladiator." "Sometimes when I'm sitting on my throne, I think of Phoenix sitting on his, with that smirk on his face."

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The Villains Questionnaire

Jack Gleeson

That's exactly who who he reminded me of the first time I saw Joffery on the throne. Phoenix doesn't get near enough credit for playing the villian you love to hate in Gladiator.

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I actually find it quite hilarious that throughout the series, the Lannister characters slowly creep towards sympathy, and become more and more fleshed out as characters and people while the Starks take a nosedive into the black pool of unforgivable stupidity.

Perhaps it's a poor example, but it reminds me of that moment in Underworld when Lucian explains to Michael that it was Viktor and the vampires that started the war, and that they were using the lycans as day-slaves for centuries, followed by Kraven telling Selene that it was Viktor that massacred her family and not a pack of werewolves.

The more I read the story, the more I find myself liking the Lannisters over the Starks.

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I know the faceless men are going to forbid her to get involved but I feel Martin is devoting a good chunk of his saga to her for a reason. At some point she's going to break the mold and go back to Westeroes in a bloody vengeance or else the Kindly Old Man is going to send her with or against Daenerys as some gambit to maintain or upset the balance of the world or some hard to understand sh^t. (still need to figure out what Jaqen is up to)

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Except Arya Stark

becomes nothing but a mindless murderer. Everything her character has been leading to is completely wiped away when she kills a man who did no wrong to her or her family. Twice. She spends the majority of her arc praying for the deaths of people that have wronged her or people she loves, and then just ends up murdering some guy who broke a vow to the Night's Watch, who she's not a member of and has no justification for killing, followed by some guy that sells insurance for ships. She becomes the very thing that she's spent the entire time praying against. She essentially becomes nothing.

Jamie did push a small child out of a window and we learned to love him ph34r.png

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I read where they're shooting the third season in Northern Ireland, Croatia & Iceland again, but the producers say they may add a fourth location.

In the books, does any significant action ever occur in Dorne? Always wondered what it might look like.

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I read where they're shooting the third season in Northern Ireland, Croatia & Iceland again, but the producers say they may add a fourth location.

In the books, does any significant action ever occur in Dorne? Always wondered what it might look like.

Dorne is heavily featured in Feast of Crows and somewhat in Dance of Dragons. You also begin to see your first major Dornish characters in Storm of Swords.

I picture it in my head as looking like Spain but with larger deserts.

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The show has great potential, just needs more combat....Or it will go the way of HBO"s {Rome} another awesome show that bit the dust because i lacked combat.

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Somebody asked about Martin's intentions for the Starks earlier in this thread and I just don't feel like going back and looking for it even though it's probably not that far back.

It is IMPOSSIBLE to like any of the Starks outside of Bran. They are Westeros' version of the Kardashians. They do things and you're just left wondering why they ever even managed to exist as long as they did. Waking themselves up in the morning without doing something monumentally stupid becomes a resounding victory for the remaining Stark children as the books progress.

House Stark is a giant nebulous of failure and I hope none of them ever get the sort of vengeance that most book readers think they deserve. Stupidity should never be rewarded.

While they have done alot of stupid things Arya, Bran and even Jon snow to an extent have been ok and certainly deserve some type of revenge for what happened to Ned and their hometown.

The first season\Book revolved heavily around them and it is the first chance we get to be familiar with the GOT world so of course we would have some connection to them and want to see some type of retribution.

I understand that there simply is no good/bad guys but not being a book reader and seeing we are only 2 seasons in and the first season revolved heavily around the Starks I'm still wanting to see them at least pull together a little more.

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Thought I'd post this here before snake creates a thread on it.

"HBO’s 'Game of Thrones' parades President George W. Bush’s decapitated head on a stick"

LOS ANGELES – In the same week that HBO is premiering a documentary about President George H.W. Bush, it has been revealed that the network’s popular drama “Game of Thrones” used a modeled head of his son President George W. Bush in a grisly decapitation scene.

The tenth episode of season one “Game of Thrones," now out on DVD, features the younger Bush’s head on a stake, and notes that his head appears in a “couple of beheading scenes,” according to commentary on the “Game of Thrones” DVD.

The show creators David Benioff and D.B. Weiss state that George W. Bush’s was used as physical inspiration to create a head for a scene in which King Joffrey shows Sansa Stark her deceased father’s head on a stick.

“It’s not a choice, not a political statement!” one of the writers insisted during the DVD commentary. “We just had to use what heads we had around.”

HBO did not respond to our request for comment, but as outrage mounted Wednesday, they released a statement saying they were "deeply dismayed to see this and find it unacceptable, disrespectful and in very bad taste." HBO also said the scene would be removed from future DVD pressings.

READ: HBO's full apology.external-link.png

The producers also did an about face, kind of, releasing their own statement.

“We use a lot of prosthetic body parts on the show: heads, arms, etc. We can’t afford to have these all made from scratch, especially in scenes where we need a lot of them, so we rent them in bulk," the statement read. "After the scene was already shot, someone pointed out that one of the heads looked like George W. Bush. In the DVD commentary, we mentioned this, though we should not have. We meant no disrespect to the former President and apologize if anything we said or did suggested otherwise.”

Several people on social media sites called for a boycott of HBO, calling the “Thrones” move “uncool” and an example of “lamestream media.”

However, others on Twitter gave the impaling act the thumbs up.

“No wonder I love this show,” tweeted one, while another called it “cleve

Read more: http://www.foxnews.c...s#ixzz1xlwvfgDq

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Martin Talks 'Game Of Thrones,' 'The Winds Of Winter'

Attempts to keep his novel releases ahead of hit series

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George R.R. Martin hopes to conclude his "A Song of Ice and Fire" series at about the same time that HBO's 'Game of Thrones' ends

As "Game of Thrones" enjoys the success of a record-breaking season, author George R.R. Martin is hoping to maintain his head start on the series starting with his next "A Song of Ice and Fire" novel, "The Winds of Winter."

HBO renewed the hit fantasy series earlier this year for a third season based on his novel "A Storm of Swords." Filming will start this summer and will include a return to Belfast, Northern Ireland; Croatia, representing parts of King’s Landing; and Iceland.

Series executive producers David Benioff ("Troy," "The Kite Runner") and D.B. Weiss signed contracts to return for two more seasons; although, the network has yet to announce a Season 4 pickup.

However, with additional season pickups likely considering the show's success, Martin is attempting to buckle down and finish his novels before HBO catches up.

"I'm working on that, and a number of 'Ice and Fire' related things at the same time," Martin recently said in an interview with HBO. "Not only 'The Winds of Winter,' which is Book 6, but we're also coming out with a big concordance called 'The World of Ice and Fire,' which is about the whole history of Westeros and will be lavishly illustrated. … We've also been doing a map book, and I'm working on a new novella about Dunk and Egg, the prequel series I have."

Martin admits his writing style is a slow process, especially with the size and complexity of his books.

"I am aware of the TV series moving along behind me like a giant locomotive, and I know I need to lay the track more quickly, perhaps, because the locomotive is soon going to be bearing down on me," he said. "The last thing I want is for the TV series to catch up with me. I've got a considerable head start, but production is moving faster than I can write. I'm hoping that we'll finish the story at about the same time ... we'll see.

"Sometimes I make the decisions wrongly. My process as a writer is not one of thoroughly outlining ahead of time, which can result in my muse leading me down blind alleys and dead ends. … So then I have to double back and rewrite and so forth. It's almost a subconscious thing -- when it's right, it feels right, and when it doesn't feel right, I keep niggling at it until it does."

Regardless, the series continued to enchant its television audience this year. "Valar Morghulis," the Season 2 finale, pulled in 5.1 million viewers June 3 when including the encore, and for the first time the series attracted over four million viewers, 4.2 million in all, during its initial airing.

Season 2 maintained stable ratings since its debut April 1. Initial episode airings have averaged 3.7 million viewers, with 10.4 million watching when factoring in all platforms and encores. This achievement places the series as the third most popular program in HBO's history.

"Game of Thrones" chronicles a treacherous clash among royal families to secure ultimate power of Westeros, a vast kingdom facing peril at every corner.

The series was recently nominated nine times during the 2012 Airlock Alpha Portal Awards, including nods for Best Actor/Television (Peter Dinklage), Best Actress/Television (Lena Headey), Best Supporting Actor/Television (Aidan Gillen), Best Supporting Actress (Michelle Fairley), Best Supporting Actress (Maisie Williams), Best Young Actor (Maisie Williams), Best Young Actor (Jack Gleeson), Best Episode/Television ("Ghost of Harrenhal") and Best Series/Television. See the nominations here.

Along with Benioff and Weiss, the series is executive produced by Carolyn Strauss and Frank Doelger. Martin, Vanessa Taylor, Alan Taylor, Guymon Casady and Vince Gerardis co-executive produce the show, with Bernadette Caulfield serving as a producer.

"Game of Thrones" stars Dinklage, Headey, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Emilia Clarke, Fairley, Williams, Sophie Turner, Kit Harington.

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Hopefully Martin completes his books before the show catches him but i don't think he will and the last thing he will do is rush through it

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Hopefully Martin completes his books before the show catches him but i don't think he will and the last thing he will do is rush through it

If their are going to split a few books into two seasons he should be able to finish them. The series could last till 2018 at this point with just the current books.

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What Will Become of Game of Thrones In The Long Run?

For tonight's open thread, a single prompt, brought on by a great article over at Pajiba. What will happen to Game of Thrones, long-term?

Brian Byrd lays out a number of big challenges for the show, including the fact that "There's no way HBO can continue to fund Game of Thrones for another six-plus seasons." In fact, he puts the chances that that problem kills the series at 20%. The bigger potential problem? That George R.R. Martin takes too long to finish the books (or just doesn't finish them), and it kills the series.

Martin is not James Patterson, shitting out paint-by-numbers fiction twice a year. The dude writes like a tortoise on Ambien. After three books in a period of four years, Martin apparently decided, for whatever reason, to viciously and repeatedly sodomize the concept of deadlines. The gap between "Storm" and "Feast" was five years; "Feast" and "Dance" six. This pace becomes a problem when, say, a hugely popular television show is dependent on your source material to exist.

No release date currently exists for "The Winds of Winter," the sixth book in the series. All anyone knows is that some of the chapters are written and that in an April webcast Martin mentioned that the final two books will weigh in around 1500 pages … each.

I gotta agree, that's a real potential problem.

Before I turn you loose in the open thread, here are a few of my thoughts on the second season.

Loved:

  • Harrenhal
  • The scenes between Arya and Tywin
  • A lot of the changes they made to the books, actually
  • Literally every single scene involving Tyrion
  • How far they took Joffrey's villainy
  • Cersei becoming a more interesting character
  • The casting of Davos
  • The casting in general, actually

  • Worried About:
  • They're going to start losing non-readers
  • They're going to sprawl too hard in the next season
  • There will be significant pacing problems posed by rearranging the next three books to keep all the characters in play
  • The big "reveal" in the final shot was, frankly, a bit disappointing

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"There's no way HBO can continue to fund Game of Thrones for another six-plus seasons."

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Worse case scenario (absolute last/worst case) HBO can fund the last couple books out as movies. Didn't they make Sex in the City movies?

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The Night is Dark and Full of Terrors: Ending "Game of Thrones"

By any metric - ratings, buzz, prestige, horse decapitations per season — Game of Thrones has established itself as one of the most popular shows on television. The ambitious fantasy extravaganza exploded in its second season — a series-high 4.2 million viewers watched the finale, up 38 percent from last year’s capper — to stealthily supplant “Boardwalk Empire” as HBO’s signature scripted offering and join “Mad Men” and “Breaking Bad” in the pantheon of modern event television. And due respect to Walter White and Don Draper, but they don’t have dragons. With a third season about to start production — and a fourth all but assured given the new two-year deals for showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss — this recent success appears to be the start of a long and prosperous journey for HBO.NBHBO

Well, maybe. One of the show’s quintessential themes, explained so succinctly by this season’s androgynous Arya Stark, is that anyone can be killed. In the coming years both HBO and “Game of Thrones” will face some difficult decisions about the show’s future, ones that will likely be made without all the pieces of the endgame fully evident. Below are the three largest foreseeable trouble spots, along with their likelihood of sabotaging the series before it reaches completion (defined as all seven of George R.R. Martin’s books depicted in some form). You’ll notice the absence of common gripes like piracy and aging. I’ve ignored these simply because they aren’t particularly crippling — the show thrives even in the face of rampant online torrenting and the young actors in the series are already much older than their counterparts on the page.

COST - There’s no way HBO can continue to fund Game of Thrones for another six-plus seasons

“Game of Thrones” is ******* expensive. Even by pay-cable standards, this series breaks the piggy bank so badly it leaves bones jutting through the porcelain. The first season set HBO back an estimated $60 million. The second, which received a 15 percent increase after Benioff and Weiss pleaded for the money needed to stage a proper Blackwater battle, delivered a tab just shy of $70 million. That’s an average $6.5 million per hour … so far. Why the qualifier? Well, remember the finale of the finale where ravenous snow-zombies ignored the fat-filled 400-pound Night’s Watchman cowering behind a rock so they could continue marching somewhere? Yeah, there’s a lot more of that as the books progress. In fact, the fantasy elements ramp up dramatically in the next three novels. The third, Storm of Swords, closes with a battle arguably more audacious — and certainly more difficult to film — than Blackwater. The world expands outside of Westeros to all corners of the Seven Kingdoms and beyond. Those dragons? They hit puberty. Quickly. All that means new sets, fresh actors and more visual effects work. The prospect of shelling out annual nine-figure budgets is enough to drive the bean counters to raging Xanax addictions.

CHANCES IT KILLS THE SERIES: 20 percent

The television world typically does a poor job of educating the average person as to how the success of a series translates into dollars. Movies have box office totals. Musicians can boast album sales and digital downloads. Television uses ratings as its default yardstick, a metric that’s not only antiquated but insufficient when trying to determine profitability.

For a pay-cable service like HBO there are three revenue streams — subscriber fees, DVD/Blu-ray sales and syndication rights. Forget subscriber fees for now as it’s far too difficult to attribute how much of an increase in subscribers, if any, is a result of one show in the portfolio. Home video sales are a different story. These are money faucets for premium cable services due to ownership rights that ensure them huge percentages of the gross sales; popular box sets can generate tens of millions of dollars on the back end. And “Game of Thrones” is very, very popular. After breaking HBO’s all-time first-week sales record, the first season went on to sell a total of 840,000 copies on DVD. Or, to put it another way, “Game of Thrones” DVDs made HBO almost $29 million. It earned another $29 million in Blu-ray sales in the first week of release. For those of you who don’t like the maths, HBO recouped the first season budget in home video sales alone. If HBO can maintain that pace it makes greenlighting massive expenditures in subsequent seasons that much more palatable.

Then there’s syndication. In 2005, A&E shelled out $2.5 million per episode for the rights to replay edited versions of Tony Soprano stuffing his piehole with gabagool. Even a conservative estimate puts “Game of Thrones” - another critically adored, highly rated serialized drama - well north of $3 million per. Assuming the series runs to completion with only the third book split across two years, “Game of Thrones” will have roughly 80 episodes to auction. That’s nearly a quarter of a billion dollars in sheer profit just by reselling existing content, more than enough to justify the upfront expenditures. Interest would have to tumble substantially for finances to play a role in cancellation.

LENGTH - The series is too long and too complex to see to fruition.

Five thousand and sixteen. No, that’s not the year Martin expects to complete his “Song of Ice and Fire” opus but the number of pages published so far. Obviously, adapting from source material this extensive requires a staggering time commitment.

Thus far the pattern has been one season per book. But that’s already changed. “Storm of Swords” is so dense and stuffed with major plot points that the producers announced season three would only cover the first half of the novel. The following two books — “A Feast for Crows” and “A Dance With Dragons” — are, respectively, the second-longest and longest books of the series thus far. Worse, they mostly take place concurrently rather than chronologically, likely necessitating a major merging of the narrative to avoid having prominent characters disappear for an entire year. With enough existing material to fuel the television series at least through 2016, does HBO really have the stomach for another three or four seasons beyond that?

CHANCE IT KILLS THE SERIES: 35 percent

If the show continues to print money and cultivate a rabid fanbase it will be exceedingly difficult for HBO to pull the plug. Nor would they want to. In the eyes of fans, HBO prematurely ending the series would be an offense on the level of clubbing a baby seal to death with a kitten. We live in a world where thousands of people mailed peanuts to a network in the hopes of keeping Skeet Ulrich on their television sets just a year longer. Successfully. Imagine the reaction if this show met a similar fate. Rubber heads on spikes sent to HBO offices? Network president Michael Lombardo’s name delivered up to the red god?

Furthermore, the adaptation doesn’t need to be as lengthy as the source material. “Storm” is the only novel that truly requires two years to bring to life. “Feast” has more fat than Precious watching Hard Boiled at a Cheesecake Factory. Trimming the story and folding the rest into “Dance” without losing the core characters/plot points is more than doable. Should HBO desire they could easily have the first five books of the series completed on screen by the end of 2016. However …

SOURCE MATERIAL - Martin takes eons to write and will never have the final two volumes ready when HBO needs them. Or ever.

Martin is not James Patterson, shitting out paint-by-numbers fiction twice a year. The dude writes like a tortoise on Ambien. After three books in a period of four years, Martin apparently decided, for whatever reason, to viciously and repeatedly sodomize the concept of deadlines. The gap between “Storm” and “Feast” was five years; “Feast” and “Dance” six. This pace becomes a problem when, say, a hugely popular television show is dependent on your source material to exist.

No release date currently exists for “The Winds of Winter,” the sixth book in the series. All anyone knows is that some of the chapters are written and that in an April webcast Martin mentioned that the final two books will weigh in around 1500 pages … each.

And then there’s mortality. As disquieting as it is to consider, there’s a possibility that the 63-year-old won’t live long enough to wrap the series. Martin resembles Santa Claus in many ways, particularly in the midsection, and the fact that he’s a Jets fan can’t thrill his cardiologist. Essentially, Martin could be one Mark Sanchezception away from expiration … and Sanchez throws a lot of interceptions. YOU’RE KILLING AN AMERICAN TREASURE, MARK! THINK BEFORE YOU RELEASE THE BALL!! Point is, there are real questions about both his capacity to have material ready when HBO needs it and his ability to finish it at all.

CHANCE IT KILLS THE SERIES: 60 percent

No one knows when the final two volumes will see the light of day. Given Martin’s traditional pace it’s highly unlikely that the series is complete by 2016, putting HBO in a very difficult position. Does the show go on hiatus and simply die on the vine? Do they stall and stretch the existing material as long as possible hoping “Winds” sees the light of day, exacerbating the aforementioned money/length problems? HBO can continue operating on a season-by-season basis if need be, although that practice opens the door for actor departures, budget fights, creative strife and all manner of other thorny issues. Absent firm release dates for the final two novels, though, they don’t have much choice. And what happens if another five years passes between the release of “Winds” and the final book of the series? Bottom line - if HBO runs out of literary road when they need it, the show is done.

However, should tragedy occur and Martin not live to complete his work, it’s hard to say how the network would proceed. Benioff and Weiss were given a detailed synopsis by Martin outlining the story and fates of the main characters should he pass away before the final two books are written, but questions of sensitivity and respect for the author’s wishes would force HBO to proceed carefully, if at all. On the other hand, in the event of Martin’s death “Game of Thrones” could become the only medium for anyone to learn how the epic concludes. In that scenario it’s almost impossible to imagine HBO taking the series off the air, particularly if it had the backing of Martin’s family.

It should be stressed that overall the series is in a fundamentally strong place and there’s little reason to worry for its short-term future. Then again, that’s just when most characters in “Game of Thrones” fall the hardest.

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