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JHav

HBO: Game of Thrones

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I hope hbo does a wheel of time show and gives it the same, if not better, treatment and production value.

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Martin doesn't think that commercial success inevitably compromises quality, but he does see a danger in making aesthetic choices for commercial reasons. On the "Tackling the Silver Screen" panel, he shared some of his experiences in Hollywood, where between 1985 and 1995, he wrote for the Twilight Zone and Beauty and the Beast. He explained the corrupting potential of Hollywood by paraphrasing the writer Harlan Ellison: trying to make great art in Hollywood is like a climbing a mountain of sh*t to plant a single rose. By the time you reach the summit, you might have lost your sense of smell.

Read more: http://www.rollingst...1#ixzz1wateU0hY

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Martin doesn't think that commercial success inevitably compromises quality, but he does see a danger in making aesthetic choices for commercial reasons. On the "Tackling the Silver Screen" panel, he shared some of his experiences in Hollywood, where between 1985 and 1995, he wrote for the Twilight Zone and Beauty and the Beast. He explained the corrupting potential of Hollywood by paraphrasing the writer Harlan Ellison: trying to make great art in Hollywood is like a climbing a mountain of sh*t to plant a single rose. By the time you reach the summit, you might have lost your sense of smell.

Read more: http://www.rollingst...1#ixzz1wateU0hY

My biggest fear since finishing the books has been the possibility that Martin will alter the story of future books based on the budget allocated to the TV show.

If that happens it would be such a ******* travesty.

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How 'Game of Thrones' pirates could end a golden age of TV

Bloggers want 'Thrones' immediately available on iTunes, but that's the biggest threat of all

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Recently, with a tone of barely concealed glee, Forbes declared that HBO’s "Game of Thrones" was on its way to becoming the most pirated show of 2012.

Piracy of premium cable shows has received more attention from bloggers since an amusing Oatmeal comic pointed out how hard they were to download legally earlier this year. Since HBO won’t make its shows available promptly on Netflix or Hulu, some argue, the channel is practically forcing fans to pirate its shows. As Forbes pointed out, "for the millions of Americans who don’t subscribe to HBO, or who may not even watch shows on a television, this means there is no legal way to watch Game of Thrones."

It’s a similar position to one taken by Reddit founder Alexis Ohanian recently. "I love paying for stuff," he insisted at Fast Company’s Innovation Uncensored event. Ohanian said he couldn’t get the show on the cable network's iPad app, HBO Go, because he’s not a cable subscriber. "There are so many people looking for an excuse to give money to support art in all of its forms," he said. "We as innovators need to do a better job price discriminating and making sure they can get access to whatever level they want to pay for it."

On the most basic level, Forbes and Ohanian are right: HBO’s decision to restrict the availability of "Game of Thrones" is one reason why it gets pirated so much. But the restriction gives HBO a business — and the wherewhithal to make shows like "Game of Thrones" in the first place. There’s a reason there’s nothing that good on network television.

No one likes paying for cable. But the rise of the pay-TV business model led to the revolution in quality we’re currently enjoying from HBO shows like "Thrones," as well as basic-cable programs like "Mad Men" and "Breaking Bad."

Years ago, when channels only received revenue from advertising, they made shows to reach as many people as possible, whether viewers loved them or just tuned in because they happened to be on. Cable changed those incentives, rewarding the creation of shows viewers felt strongly enough to pay for (indirectly in the case of channels like FX and AMC). That made nuanced drama profitable on television — and the best television more sophisticated than film. Sometimes, you really do get what you pay for.

No one likes paying for cable. But the rise of the pay-TV business model led to the revolution in quality we’re currently enjoying from HBO shows like "Thrones." Shows like "Game of Thrones" cost big bucks. Each episode of the first season reportedly had a budget of more than $5 million.

Most such shows don’t attract all that many viewers compared to cheaper mainstream programs like "American Idol." And if "Game of Thrones" sounds like easy money, remember that it has to generate enough profit to make up for "Rome and John From Cincinnati." If HBO sold every show by the episode right away, it would have to charge a premium for hits to make up for its inevitable misses.

There are those who argue that the future lies in cheaper content, available simultaneously on a variety of platforms. This doesn’t work so well in the present. Big-budget shows have better odds of capturing an audience, and they’ll inevitably make less money on advertising as more consumers watch them on DVRs. One shudders to think about product placement opportunities for a show like "Thrones."

The idea that HBO’s exclusivity amounts to an outrage seems silly, since it essentially amounts to commerce: If you want it, you have to pay for it. Obviously, HBO sets its own terms — it sells content by the month, not the episode — but so does every other company, in some way.

Beer isn’t sold in five-packs. And, of course, "Thrones" is available on iTunes a year after it airs. (I waited to buy it and I’ve managed to lead a fulfilling life.) As the online kids say, call the Waambulance!

Piracy certainly threatens HBO, to the extent that it offers consumers a way to cancel their subscriptions. But the greater threat is that executives would listen to advice from bloggers and make "Thrones" immediately available on iTunes. The $30 or $35 HBO would get for an entire season of the show just wouldn’t add up to much compared to the $15 or so per month it gets from subscribers. As Forbes says, HBO is certainly "missing out on a huge potential audience." But so is Mercedes-Benz, and no one suggests it should start making Hyundais.

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^^^ It doesn't help that HBO is responding to this by becoming more restrictive with their media. You can't even DVR their shows anymore. This, I believe, is a microcosm to the problems the various media networks have been experiencing due to the internet. Technology is changing which is causing more and more people to abandon cable altogether. After all, why pay an arm and a leg for it when you can get things like Netflix for very little? Still, people want to watch the new shows but don't want to wait a year+ for them to come on Netflix, if they even do at all.

The logical response to piracy is to adapt your business model; You have to compete with free, but people have shown they are more than willing to pay for products online if they can immediately obtain them at fair prices and don't have strings attached which limit their use or ownership. The gaming industry has done this with Steam, as it provides a huge selection of computer games and often for cheaper prices than at stores and Louis CK and other comedians have released albums online for only $5 and have made a killing off them, so why can't HBO and other companies do something similar? If HBO offered a service where you could download the episodes not long after they air for, say, $5-8 apiece, they would have a major boom. ****, at those prices they could potentially make more than selling DVD box sets. Instead, they have become more restrictive towards their audience and have backed draconian legislation to keep their obsolete business model afloat.

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^^^ It doesn't help that HBO is responding to this by becoming more restrictive with their media. You can't even DVR their shows anymore. This, I believe, is a microcosm to the problems the various media networks have been experiencing due to the internet. Technology is changing which is causing more and more people to abandon cable altogether. After all, why pay an arm and a leg for it when you can get things like Netflix for very little? Still, people want to watch the new shows but don't want to wait a year+ for them to come on Netflix, if they even do at all.

The logical response to piracy is to adapt your business model; You have to compete with free, but people have shown they are more than willing to pay for products online if they can immediately obtain them at fair prices and don't have strings attached which limit their use or ownership. The gaming industry has done this with Steam, as it provides a huge selection of computer games and often for cheaper prices than at stores and Louis CK and other comedians have released albums online for only $5 and have made a killing off them, so why can't HBO and other companies do something similar? If HBO offered a service where you could download the episodes not long after they air for, say, $5-8 apiece, they would have a major boom. ****, at those prices they could potentially make more than selling DVD box sets. Instead, they have become more restrictive towards their audience and have backed draconian legislation to keep their obsolete business model afloat.

I gladly pay money to Amazon.com to watch "The Walking Dead" 24 hours after each new episode airs and I would gladly pay the same to HBO for "Game of Thrones". But since the latter isn't available, on the days that I don't go over to a friend's house to watch it, I d*** sure pirate the s*** out of that episode to keep up to date with the series. It's a classic example of someone who is willing to pay but has to pirate because that is the only way to get the content. And I will buy the DVD's next season gladly to live through the season once more.

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Wait u can't dvr hbo shows anymore?? That's ridiculous, I work at 10 so would never get to see some of their best stuff!

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Watch the 27-Hour ‘Game of Thrones’ Marathon Before the Finale

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One can never have too much ‘Game of Thrones.’ Seriously! With only ten episodes in a season, and HBO approaching the end of the George R.R. Martin’s series’ second outing, there’s precious little time spend exploring Westeros as the War of the Five Kings rages. So as if this Sunday’s upcoming epic ‘Blackwater‘ isn’t enough to satisfy, how about a solid 27 hours worth before the June 3 finale?

In case you haven’t caught the second season of HBO’s ‘Game of Thrones,’ or merely want a refresher course in time for June 3 season finale “Valar Morghulis, HBO Zone has you covered. In anticipation of the HBO finale, HBO Zone will screen the first nine episodes of season 2 not once, not twice, but three times for a 27-hour refresher course!

We’d recommend watching all 27 hours, in sequence. Just to be sure you haven’t missed anything. You never know.

Beginning Saturday, June 2 at 6:00 p.m. on HBO Zone the first marathon will run until 3:00 a.m., immediately followed by a second until noon on Sunday, the third sequence finally ending at 9:00 p.m. just as the season finale begins on HBO. And for extra fun, why not watch the first season early Saturday morning to be thorough?

That’s our Memorial Day. Who needs a barbecue? Check out the marathon on June 2, and tell us how many times you’ll watch in the comments!

Jimsmusic™ and Goal Line D like this

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Wait u can't dvr hbo shows anymore?? That's ridiculous, I work at 10 so would never get to see some of their best stuff!

There is some sort of new policy in which if you DVR their shows you're blocked from watching the recording. I don't know the exact details of the policy, however.

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HOLY **** WHITE WALKER/ZOMBIE ARMY. Good finale. In an interesting parallel to last season, it ended above the wall this season as well. The scene with Maester Luwin was very touching. Favorite line of the episode "It was a good speech, I didn't want to interrupt."

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