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JHav

HBO: Game of Thrones

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Quality dumper for sure. Whoever is in charge of casting the broads on this show should be commended (with the exception of the Tully women)

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It's bothering me that they're calling this The War of the Five Kings in the show. Beside the fact that Balon doesn't declare himself the King of the Iron Islands until after Renly's death, which would keep the number of self-declared kings at four, Lord Greyjoy hasn't done f*ck all except give Yara and Theon free reign to conquer what they like, as is the iron way.

What I didn't understand was the scene between Theon and Yara/Asha. Don't get me wrong, it was a fantastic scene between the two, but I didn't get the reasoning behind it, nor did I understand the same scene in the book.

Balon Greyjoy takes up the crown of salt and iron and declares himself King of the Iron Islands, but then sends word to Yara/Asha to tell Theon to come home after he takes the Heart of the North because he fears that Theon has bitten off more than he can chew. Yara/Asha echoes these sentiments by telling Theon "Don't die so far away from the sea." Dude, what? You're the ******* ones who decided to raid the North in the first place taking Deepwood Motte and Torrhen's Square, but then Theon concocts a brilliant plan to capture Winterfell, the ancient capitol of the entire region and suddenly you want to back off? Sh*t or get off the pot, b*tch. If you're planning to take over the North then why are you pleading for your brother to abandon his plans the second he gives you the greatest prize House Greyjoy has ever known?

Theon manages to succeed at something that so many Greyjoys before him have failed to do, yet your response, after all that talk of "rights of conquest" and doing things "the iron way" and being badass pirate-viking-raiders is "Uh, we were just kidding dude come back home, you've taken this too far." Balon Greyjoy is a punk *****.

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It's bothering me that they're calling this The War of the Five Kings in the show. Beside the fact that Balon doesn't declare himself the King of the Iron Islands until after Renly's death, which would keep the number of self-declared kings at four, Lord Greyjoy hasn't done f*ck all except give Yara and Theon free reign to conquer what they like, as is the iron way.

What I didn't understand was the scene between Theon and Yara/Asha. Don't get me wrong, it was a fantastic scene between the two, but I didn't get the reasoning behind it, nor did I understand the same scene in the book.

Balon Greyjoy takes up the crown of salt and iron and declares himself King of the Iron Islands, but then sends word to Yara/Asha to tell Theon to come home after he takes the Heart of the North because he fears that Theon has bitten off more than he can chew. Yara/Asha echoes these sentiments by telling Theon "Don't die so far away from the sea." Dude, what? You're the ******* ones who decided to raid the North in the first place taking Deepwood Motte and Torrhen's Square, but then Theon concocts a brilliant plan to capture Winterfell, the ancient capitol of the entire region and suddenly you want to back off? Sh*t or get off the pot, b*tch. If you're planning to take over the North then why are you pleading for your brother to abandon his plans the second he gives you the greatest prize House Greyjoy has ever known?

Theon manages to succeed at something that so many Greyjoys before him have failed to do, yet your response, after all that talk of "rights of conquest" and doing things "the iron way" and being badass pirate-viking-raiders is "Uh, we were just kidding dude come back home, you've taken this too far." Balon Greyjoy is a punk *****.

The producers do their explaining of the motivations in that Theon & Yara scene in this video starting at 1:40

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It's bothering me that they're calling this The War of the Five Kings in the show. Beside the fact that Balon doesn't declare himself the King of the Iron Islands until after Renly's death, which would keep the number of self-declared kings at four, Lord Greyjoy hasn't done f*ck all except give Yara and Theon free reign to conquer what they like, as is the iron way.

What I didn't understand was the scene between Theon and Yara/Asha. Don't get me wrong, it was a fantastic scene between the two, but I didn't get the reasoning behind it, nor did I understand the same scene in the book.

Balon Greyjoy takes up the crown of salt and iron and declares himself King of the Iron Islands, but then sends word to Yara/Asha to tell Theon to come home after he takes the Heart of the North because he fears that Theon has bitten off more than he can chew. Yara/Asha echoes these sentiments by telling Theon "Don't die so far away from the sea." Dude, what? You're the ******* ones who decided to raid the North in the first place taking Deepwood Motte and Torrhen's Square, but then Theon concocts a brilliant plan to capture Winterfell, the ancient capitol of the entire region and suddenly you want to back off? Sh*t or get off the pot, b*tch. If you're planning to take over the North then why are you pleading for your brother to abandon his plans the second he gives you the greatest prize House Greyjoy has ever known?

Theon manages to succeed at something that so many Greyjoys before him have failed to do, yet your response, after all that talk of "rights of conquest" and doing things "the iron way" and being badass pirate-viking-raiders is "Uh, we were just kidding dude come back home, you've taken this too far." Balon Greyjoy is a punk *****.

Reading the books, I have gotten the impression that the Iron-born are more raiders and pillagers than conquerors. They sack a village, take what's theirs, then move on. Theon took Winterfell by surprise with 20 men. He would have absolutely no chance of holding the city when a real force comes calling.

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Yara said something about their ships being their strength and Winterfell being too far inland.

What I'd like to know is if in the books they explain why Robert gave Storm's End to Renly instead of Stannis.

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The producers do their explaining of the motivations in that Theon & Yara scene in this video starting at 1:40

My issue is not with the fact that Yara actually holds some sisterly love for Theon and fears for his safety.

It's the fact that this is the greatest opportunity House Greyjoy has ever had to raid the North after capturing 3 prominent castles, one of which being the ancient capitol of the North that has nothing but a cripple and his Aspergers-riddled brother to protect it and Yara and Balon's reaction is to just tuck tail and go back home?

What was the point of invading and attempting to conquer the North if your plan was to just go home and die close to the sea all along? Why the **** didn't you just sit your miserable ***** on your iron rocks and grow old and die then?

All the other Greyjoys talk of conquering the North but the second Theon actually gives them their greatest foothold they want him to abandon it because it's too dangerous. Theon is being manipulated and mind-****** beyond all recognition.

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Yara said something about their ships being their strength and Winterfell being too far inland.

What I'd like to know is if in the books they explain why Robert gave Storm's End to Renly instead of Stannis.

Because he reminded him of his younger self and he knew the Lords of the Stormlands loved him and would rally behind him. Stannis is un-flenching in his sense of duty and honor. He's cold and lawful and makes no exceptions for the laws of the land.

So much so that even AFTER Davos smuggled in food for Storm's End and saved an entire castle from being wiped out due to starvation, Stannis STILL had the tips of his fingers removed for bringing the food in without proper passage.

Robert knew that nobody would ever love Stannis enough to follow him into battle under the Baratheon banners should the need ever arise, so he gave Storm's End to Renly instead, and awarded Stannis the ancient home of the Targaryen's, Dragonstone, which is miles off the coast of Westeros.

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Who are the 3 guys Jaime thinks can give him a go: The Mountain, The Hound, and...??

I assume he thinks Barristan Selmy is too old, but who knows. Ned Stark was the only other one.

Also I'm not ruling out that Jaqen isn't a ninja.

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It's bothering me that they're calling this The War of the Five Kings in the show. Beside the fact that Balon doesn't declare himself the King of the Iron Islands until after Renly's death, which would keep the number of self-declared kings at four, Lord Greyjoy hasn't done f*ck all except give Yara and Theon free reign to conquer what they like, as is the iron way.

What I didn't understand was the scene between Theon and Yara/Asha. Don't get me wrong, it was a fantastic scene between the two, but I didn't get the reasoning behind it, nor did I understand the same scene in the book.

Balon Greyjoy takes up the crown of salt and iron and declares himself King of the Iron Islands, but then sends word to Yara/Asha to tell Theon to come home after he takes the Heart of the North because he fears that Theon has bitten off more than he can chew. Yara/Asha echoes these sentiments by telling Theon "Don't die so far away from the sea." Dude, what? You're the ******* ones who decided to raid the North in the first place taking Deepwood Motte and Torrhen's Square, but then Theon concocts a brilliant plan to capture Winterfell, the ancient capitol of the entire region and suddenly you want to back off? Sh*t or get off the pot, b*tch. If you're planning to take over the North then why are you pleading for your brother to abandon his plans the second he gives you the greatest prize House Greyjoy has ever known?

Theon manages to succeed at something that so many Greyjoys before him have failed to do, yet your response, after all that talk of "rights of conquest" and doing things "the iron way" and being badass pirate-viking-raiders is "Uh, we were just kidding dude come back home, you've taken this too far." Balon Greyjoy is a punk *****.

The iron-born are a naval power. Don't have knights to fight because they don't have land to give them.

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Because he reminded him of his younger self and he knew the Lords of the Stormlands loved him and would rally behind him. Stannis is un-flenching in his sense of duty and honor. He's cold and lawful and makes no exceptions for the laws of the land.

So much so that even AFTER Davos smuggled in food for Storm's End and saved an entire castle from being wiped out due to starvation, Stannis STILL had the tips of his fingers removed for bringing the food in without proper passage.

Robert knew that nobody would ever love Stannis enough to follow him into battle under the Baratheon banners should the need ever arise, so he gave Storm's End to Renly instead, and awarded Stannis the ancient home of the Targaryen's, Dragonstone, which is miles off the coast of Westeros.

Didn't Robert also appoint Stannis to some nautical bureaucratic job as well, only he hadn't been in King's Landing in a while? Stannis was never on the King's Council like Renly, at The Hand's meetings and such, was he?

I thought I read/saw that Stannis removed the last knuckle on 3 fingers of one of Davos' hands and that Davos keeps them in his breast pocket. Did Stannis remove the fingers for the specefic act of bringing food into Storm's End, or did he do so for Davos' past smuggling transgressions?

Hopefully this week we see that black pirate friend of Davos' that wants to bang Cersei.

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Something I thought of after this week's episode and reading the books: how much time elapses during the series? Reading the first book has been weird because it reminds you of how young the characters really are, but even in the first season the actors portraying the children especially looked for the most to be in their late teens. But on Sunday's episode, Tyrion asked if Joffrey was 17. Wasn't he 14 at the beginning of the first book? Neither the book nor the show go into how long periods of time go by, only short periods like fortnights.

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Not much is made of how much time passes during the series at all. Generally it's believed that anywhere from 2-4 years have passed from book 1 to book 5. The only time I've really heard about time passing in the show is the first episode of season 1 when Cersei tells Robert they've been on the road for a month and that "the dead can wait." So we can assume at least a month passed from the time Ned left Winterfell to the time he arrived in King's Landing.

It's confused me a few times this year, notably how quickly Littlefinger seems to travel. One episode he's in Renly's camp, and then the next episode he's chatting with Tywin. Unless he has the ability to teleport, I assume it was a week or two in between each visit.

I believe Martin originally planned for a 5-year time jump after Book 3 so it could give some of his characters time to grow up (He has stated that he wishes he would have made the younger characters about 5 years older than he did), but he abandoned that plan for some reason.

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Been reading some sorta conflicting stuff about "Blackwater"...

Unlike the Season 1 battle which began with Tryion getting knocked out and fast-forwarded to him waking up after it had ended, 'Blackwater' will focus almost entirely on the Stannis invasion of King's Landing with minimal shortcuts. A Song of Ice and Fire author George R.R. Martin has stepped in to pen the screenplay that will take one of the most important battles from the books and condense it into one action-packed episode.

HBO's synopsis for each episode typically circles Westeros, touching upon each of the key players and where their story is headed. The synopsis for 'Blackwater' is a single sentence only, "Tyrion and the Lannisters fight for their lives." The expectation is that every minute of 'Blackwater' will be devoted to Lord Stannis' invasion.

Game of Thrones showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss have gone on record as saying they fought hard with HBO to get the necessary budget to bring the Battle of Blackwater Bay to life on the small screen. They didn't get every dollar asked for, but got enough to film the battle as written by George R.R. Martin. This episode will feature far more visual effects shots than any before it, covering a naval assault and subsequent ground attack that will shake King's Landing at its core.

Game of Thrones 'Blackwater' Promo: War is Coming to King's Landing

  • It was reported that co-producer Vince Gerardis had said that the titular and iconic Battle of the Blackwater will take up 16 minutes of the finished episode. However, this was later corrected to a general statement that it takes up a notable portion of the episode and is impressive, but likely not as impressive as some fans would like it to be.[3]
  • Producers David Benioff and D.B. Weiss were disappointed at not being able to film the large-scale Battle of the Green Fork in Season 1, so always planned to shoot the Battle of the Blackwater. At one stage budgetary restrictions made it look like it would not be possible and the battle would have to take place off-screen, but the producers were able to convince HBO to provide a larger budget for the episode.[4]
  • Despite the larger budget and a creative decision to move the battle to the night, there was still not enough time or money to film the battle as depicted in the books. George R.R. Martin was aware of this and pared the battle down significantly in his script. However, it still retained several elements that the producers then had to remove to make the budget work.[4]

Blackwater (episode) - Game of Thrones Wiki

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I might have to get this. I still listen to my Gladiator soundtrack from time to time.

I believe they have one composer who does all their stuff. I like how they'll take a particular piece, then re-use it later while changing the tempo, or whether it's the strings or it's the percussions being emphasized, or various other musical elements I'm not qualified to speak on, in order to make the song match the new scene's mood.

I can't remember which episode they used a different interpretation of this one, but I think I remember it was changed to play more somber as opposed to how triumphant it was in the final scene of the first season.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xSm5aZNDYq4

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We checked in on every single storyline last week... which was why that episode wasn't one of the stronger ones... so I really wonder if we'll be anywhere other than King's Landing and Blackwater Bay for the entirety of this week's episode.

I wouldn't be mad if I didn't see Qarth and The Wall again till the finale.

game-of-thrones-battle-of-blackwater-hbo.png

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Pretty sure this episode will only have one setting. That's all I'm hearing and the only episode description for this week is 'The Lannisters fight for their lives in King's Landing.

Little bit discouraged by what you posted a few posts up about the battle, but I wasn't expecting Helm's Deep or anything like that. There's really only one scene that I want to see for sure, and if we get some good choreographed POV sequences I'll be cool with that.

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