Jump to content

Egypt's Mubarak says he won't run for a new term


JDaveG
 Share

Recommended Posts

Egypt's Mubarak says he won't run for a new term

AP

Hosni Mubarak AP – In this image from Egyptian state television aired Tuesday evening Feb 1 2011, Egyptian President Hosni …

By SARAH EL DEEB and HADEEL AL-SHALCHI, Associated Press Sarah El Deeb And Hadeel Al-shalchi, Associated Press – 9 mins ago

CAIRO – Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak said he will not run for a new term in office in September elections, but rejected demands that he step down immediately and leave the country, vowing to die on Egypt's soil, in a television address Tuesday after a dramatic day in which a quarter-million protesters called on him to go.

Mubarak said he would serve out the rest of his term working to ensure a "peaceful transfer of power" and carry out amendments to rules on presidential elections.

But the half-way concession — an end to his rule months down the road — was immediately derided by protesters massed in Cairo's main downtown square.

Watching his speech on a giant TV set up in Tahrir square, protesters booed and waved their shoes over the heads in a sign of contempt. "Go, go, go! We are not leaving until he leaves," they chanted, and one man screamed, "He doesn't want to say it, he doesn't want to say it."

The 82-year-old Mubarak, who has ruled the country for nearly three decades, insisted that his decision not to run had nothing to do with the unprecedented protests that have shaken Egypt the past week. "I tell you in all sincerity, regardless of the current circumstances, I never intended to be a candidate for another term."

"I will work for the final remaining months of the current term to accomplish the necessary steps for the peaceful transfer of power," he said.

Mubarak, a former air force commander, resolutely vowed not to flee the country. "This dear nation .. is where I lived, I fought for it and defended its soil, sovereignty and interests. On its soil I will die. History will judge me like it did others."

His speech came after a visiting envoy of President Barack Obama told Mubarak that his ally the United States sees his presidency at an end. Frank Wisner, a respected former U.S. ambassador to Egypt who is a friend of the Egyptian president, made clear to Mubarak that the U.S "view that his tenure as president is coming to close," according to an administration official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the delicacy of the ongoing diplomacy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Its not going to be enough. Nothing short of an immediate resignation will resolve this crisis. The nation is basicly shutdown as it is and the lack of basic needs will pump enriched oxygen into the fuel. He needs to find a suitable substitute until special elections can be held.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Its not going to be enough. Nothing short of an immediate resignation will resolve this crisis. The nation is basicly shutdown as it is and the lack of basic needs will pump enriched oxygen into the fuel. He needs to find a suitable substitute until special elections can be held.

Perfectly positioned for a military junta followed by a power vacuum for years. When the military doesn't follow the orders of the nations leader, they are always following the orders of someone. I read where a senior Muslim Brotherhood official went on Iranian TV to say that all Egyptians should be prepared for war with Israel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Perfectly positioned for a military junta followed by a power vacuum for years. When the military doesn't follow the orders of the nations leader, they are always following the orders of someone. I read where a senior Muslim Brotherhood official went on Iranian TV to say that all Egyptians should be prepared for war with Israel.

If elections arent held ASAP, thats exactly what you will get.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If elections arent held ASAP, thats exactly what you will get.

Unfortunately, elections won't solve anything but a temporary quelling of emotions. This isn't a focused rebellion, but a general cry of frustration from a hodge podge of constituencies. The real battle is for "what's next?".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...