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Vargil
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So I've decided to take guitar lessons (acoustic) and wanted to find a good guitar to start with that I can practice and learn on that will last me a while. Anyone have any good suggestions?

Also I'd love to hear if anyone thinks it would be better to start with electric vs. acoustic and why. I don't know, so I am asking.

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I would recommend learning on acoustic steel string to build finger strength. Plus acoustic necks are generally a little wider which makes it easier for beginners to chord.

I don't know your price range so I can't recommend a brand. if you are taking lessons in a music store, ask if you can try different ones during your lesson. It is worth spending a little more to get one that is easier to fret, because a bad, hard to play guitar can break your spirit and make you give up.. Make sure if you are having trouble playing it's you and not the guitar.

There are some easy to play cheap guitars for under 200 bucks. I was really impressed with an Esteban I played at a pawn shop as far as playability.It wouold have been a fine beginners guitar. I have no idea how they hold out over the long run, tho.

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Second the D10-N if you go acoustic.

For electric, you can't beat a Squier Classic Vibe Telecaster for the $$$. $300 of awesome classic Tele sounds. If you want a Strat, the CV Strat is fine, too, but I'd recommend the Tele because trem guitars are finicky and you don't want to get frustrated early trying to keep it in tune. Plus, everyone needs at least 1 good Tele.

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Second the D10-N if you go acoustic.

For electric, you can't beat a Squier Classic Vibe Telecaster for the $$$. $300 of awesome classic Tele sounds. If you want a Strat, the CV Strat is fine, too, but I'd recommend the Tele because trem guitars are finicky and you don't want to get frustrated early trying to keep it in tune. Plus, everyone needs at least 1 good Tele.

I'll agree with this one.........I've owned a tele since 73 and when they bury me the one I have now goes with me

sam

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Second the D10-N if you go acoustic.

For electric, you can't beat a Squier Classic Vibe Telecaster for the $$$. $300 of awesome classic Tele sounds. If you want a Strat, the CV Strat is fine, too, but I'd recommend the Tele because trem guitars are finicky and you don't want to get frustrated early trying to keep it in tune. Plus, everyone needs at least 1 good Tele.

I'll second the tele suggestion too. I own a mexican made telecaster, and it's one kick butt little instrument. You can't go wrong with a telecaster!

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Ibanez Artcore AS-73 are great guitars that can be found on Craigslist, etc for under $300. Of course, if you go electric, you will need to spend some $$ on an amp, too.

A word of advice, I have a few friends who make a living teaching guitar lessons, and if their income didn't depend on it (so they could be fully honest with you), they would suggest that you teach yourself.

There are so many online vids & info for free that as long as you have the drive to learn, you don't need to pay for a teacher. Also, teaching yourself allows you to develop your own true style & helps develop your ear.

If you think you want to become a guitarist, teach yourself.

If you just want to learn how to play a bunch of covers for fun, take lessons.

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A word of advice, I have a few friends who make a living teaching guitar lessons, and if their income didn't depend on it (so they could be fully honest with you), they would suggest that you teach yourself.

There are so many online vids & info for free that as long as you have the drive to learn, you don't need to pay for a teacher. Also, teaching yourself allows you to develop your own true style & helps develop your ear.

If you think you want to become a guitarist, teach yourself.

If you just want to learn how to play a bunch of covers for fun, take lessons.

Honestly -- and we rarely disagree -- I could not disagree more.

I "taught myself" for 25 years. I now have about 2 years of lessons, and I am light years ahead of where I was 2 years ago (meaning I merely suck, instead of sucking donkey balls out loud :P ).

If you want to learn the bare bones basics of pentatonic blues/rock wanking, teach yourself. If you are INCREDIBLY astute or a prodigy on the instrument (or if you have other musical training already, preferably piano), you can learn a lot more on your own (I have a friend who is largely self taught, but his dad plays, he took a LOT of seminars, etc., and he is put lightly a prodigy). I also agree youtube is an awesome resource for learning basics and the note-for-note stuff. But there are more advanced theory issues you really need a good instructor for, IMHO. I know playing off the chords and soloing outside the minor pentatonic box for me has improved by leaps and bounds since I started taking lessons. My technique isn't appreciably better, but I now not only know how to play, for example, the solo to "You Shook Me All Night Long," but why Angus chose those notes and why it sounds good. We were doing Clapton-esque major/minor pentatonic blends over blues progressions over a year ago, and now I can throw in Dorian and Mixolydian licks as well as half-whole diminished licks over the same progression and do so seamlessly without having to think "gee, I should play some Dorian here." I just know what notes "fit" now, so I don't have to think through them or hunt for them. And it sounds so much better when all the notes fit over the chord you are playing, instead of sounding like someone playing scales over a progression.

I knew I was improving when we'd work on a song and I'd play the part we just went over and then I knew where to go (even though that's not where the recording artist went). In other words, when I could improvise my own solo on the fly instead of relying on what they did. I'd recommend lessons if you can afford them.

and if you want to be a ####ty guitarist, let me teach you. :P

Or do this -- this is much better advice :lol:

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:lol:

it's true. I just never had " it" on guitar and I knew it early on. Trthfully I only wanted to play guitar so I could write songs, and I learned well enough to do that and just stopped learning it seems. And even at that, I write almost entirely in G C and D, which is easy for me to sing in. I figured what the heck, you can always transpose later and a good song is a good song, more so about lyrics to me.

but I still have a little itch to learn more so I started practicing scales. Then I had a slight stroke in my left hand and just said " screw it, :P

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Snippage

My technique isn't appreciably better, but I now not only know how to play, for example, the solo to "You Shook Me All Night Long," but why Angus chose those notes and why it sounds good. .

I've been struggling along solo trying to figure out the whys and wheres instead of just learning note for note cover tunes.

Struggling the key word. So lessons in music theory taught by a competent teacher may better serve than attempting to self teach? Thanks for the advice and info...much appreciated.

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Honestly -- and we rarely disagree -- I could not disagree more.

I "taught myself" for 25 years. I now have about 2 years of lessons, and I am light years ahead of where I was 2 years ago (meaning I merely suck, instead of sucking donkey balls out loud :P ).

If you want to learn the bare bones basics of pentatonic blues/rock wanking, teach yourself. If you are INCREDIBLY astute or a prodigy on the instrument (or if you have other musical training already, preferably piano), you can learn a lot more on your own (I have a friend who is largely self taught, but his dad plays, he took a LOT of seminars, etc., and he is put lightly a prodigy). I also agree youtube is an awesome resource for learning basics and the note-for-note stuff. But there are more advanced theory issues you really need a good instructor for, IMHO. I know playing off the chords and soloing outside the minor pentatonic box for me has improved by leaps and bounds since I started taking lessons. My technique isn't appreciably better, but I now not only know how to play, for example, the solo to "You Shook Me All Night Long," but why Angus chose those notes and why it sounds good. We were doing Clapton-esque major/minor pentatonic blends over blues progressions over a year ago, and now I can throw in Dorian and Mixolydian licks as well as half-whole diminished licks over the same progression and do so seamlessly without having to think "gee, I should play some Dorian here." I just know what notes "fit" now, so I don't have to think through them or hunt for them. And it sounds so much better when all the notes fit over the chord you are playing, instead of sounding like someone playing scales over a progression.

I knew I was improving when we'd work on a song and I'd play the part we just went over and then I knew where to go (even though that's not where the recording artist went). In other words, when I could improvise my own solo on the fly instead of relying on what they did. I'd recommend lessons if you can afford them.

Or do this -- this is much better advice :lol:

I think in a situation like yours, it makes a lot of sense to take lessons. If you already have an above average grasp on playing, but feel you have reached a plateau, it's probably not a bad idea to take some lessons. I have many friends who are much more knowledgable and technically savvy guitarists than I am, and from time to time I pick their brins to help get over a hump. However, I feel that most people that START playing guitar by taking lessons don't stick with it too often for whatever reason. Plus, the basic stuff is stuff you can teach yourself with relative ease, and that can be a much more rewarding result than just doing what someone else tells you to do.

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I think in a situation like yours, it makes a lot of sense to take lessons. If you already have an above average grasp on playing, but feel you have reached a plateau, it's probably not a bad idea to take some lessons. I have many friends who are much more knowledgable and technically savvy guitarists than I am, and from time to time I pick their brins to help get over a hump. However, I feel that most people that START playing guitar by taking lessons don't stick with it too often for whatever reason. Plus, the basic stuff is stuff you can teach yourself with relative ease, and that can be a much more rewarding result than just doing what someone else tells you to do.

That may be right -- frankly, I think everyone should start on piano if you are serious about learning an instrument. I really wish I had (and I'll probably end up taking piano lessons yet). Everything you need to know about music and theory is right there on the keyboard.

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I've been struggling along solo trying to figure out the whys and wheres instead of just learning note for note cover tunes.

Struggling the key word. So lessons in music theory taught by a competent teacher may better serve than attempting to self teach? Thanks for the advice and info...much appreciated.

I think so. Before I took lessons, I could throw minor blues licks over a progression, assuming the progression started on the root chord (i.e., if the key is A, A needed to be the first chord in the progression, because if not, I'd play A-minor pentatonic over, say, they key of D, which sounds like rusted butt if you don't know which notes are safe). From there, my instructor taught me major pentatonic (easy if you know minor -- just move down 3 frets), then how to solo over the chord using major pentatonic instead of staying in the same scale for all the chords, then the major scale, then major/minor a'la Clapton, then some of the modes (I'm still not well versed in modal stuff), etc. I still can't apply most of it because I just don't practice it enough, but I know for example that if I have a G7 chord at the 3rd fret, I have a Dorian pattern, a Mixolydian pattern, a half-whole diminished pattern, and major and minor blues scales that are all options. And if it moves to say the IV chord, I can usually stay put, or I can transition to C minor or major pentatonic, etc. I'm usually not thinking "oh, I'm playing Dorian here" or whatever. It's more just knowing which notes are safe -- which ones "fit" over the chord the band is playing.

The other benefit is along the way you start to associate chord shapes with scales, so I know that if I have a certain C-chord (say the C-form barre chord at the 12th fret), I also have a certain pentatonic box for major and another for minor that fit over the chord in that position, and I know which major scale box fits there as well. So your options start to expand on what you can play on the neck because you are free to move around more, and at the same time you don't necessarily have to move around at all since all the notes are usually right where you are anyway. Add to that the fact you can now do chord melody and play licks off the chords and all of a sudden your rhythm playing is improving.

I still don't consider myself a "good" guitar player. But I'm way better now than I used to be. I attribute 90% of that to taking lessons. The other 10% is playing with a band and playing live, both of which have improved my playing a lot.

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i am horrible at guitar but when I have some THC in me i sit and play forever with the delay pedal and go on journeys of epic proportions where elder statesmen of the badger population have taken reign over the universe and enslaved the human race to dig for grub worms. And then i save the human race when i hit the phaser pedal and blast all the badgers to bits and am crowned king of ****** guitar playing but sounds good when you're hight YESS!!!!!

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That may be right -- frankly, I think everyone should start on piano if you are serious about learning an instrument. I really wish I had (and I'll probably end up taking piano lessons yet). Everything you need to know about music and theory is right there on the keyboard.

I have so many friends who are bummed their parents forced them to take piano lessons when they were younger and here I sit at 33 wishing I had been forced to take piano lessons.... :D

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THis is the product of being self taught... if this is bad to you, so be it. Yeah, there are some notes that are a little off, but this is from a live show during a song that is mostly improved.

Oh, I'm not saying it can't happen. SRV was self-taught. EVH was self-taught.

I'm just saying most people aren't prodigies.

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