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Mark Cuban can become the most popular man amongst college football fans


ChuyDawg
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I personally think the guy is nuts but he may be on to something.

From ESPN:

DALLAS -- After two failed bids to buy a Major League Baseball team, billionaire Mark Cuban is seriously considering trying to use his money to create a playoff alternative to college football's Bowl Championship Series.

Cuban, the outspoken owner of the NBA's Dallas Mavericks, told ESPNDallas.com on Wednesday that he is "actively interested but in the exploratory stage" of creating and funding a playoff system to crown a champion for major college football.

"The more I think about it, the more sense it makes as opposed to buying a baseball team," said Cuban, who tried to buy the Chicago Cubs and Texas Rangers within the last few years. "You can do something the whole country wants done."

Cuban said he has talked to two athletic directors from BCS conferences who were extremely enthusiastic about the idea. He intends to contact several school presidents and state senators in the coming weeks to determine whether the idea is worth pursuing.

Cuban said he envisions either a 12- or 16-team playoff field with the higher seeds getting homefield advantage. The homefield advantage, Cuban said, would ensure the college football regular-season games would not lose any importance.

The bowl games could still exist under Cuban's plan, but he said he would make it more profitable for programs to make the playoffs than a bowl.

"Put $500 million in the bank and go to all the schools and pay them money as an option," Cuban said. "Say, 'Look, I'm going to give you X amount every five years. In exchange, you say if you're picked for the playoff system, you'll go.' "

One way to push school presidents toward approving the idea would be to lobby major donors of college athletic programs, Cuban said. He suggested convincing the donors to cut off their donations until their presidents approved a playoff system.

Cuban, who is reading the book "Death to the BCS," said he thinks it would take about three or four years of planning before enacting the playoff system. He believes it's a better business opportunity than owning a baseball team, and he admits he's intrigued by the idea of revolutionizing a major sport.

"It's an inefficient business where there's obviously a better way of doing it," Cuban said. "The only thing that's kept them from doing it is a lack of capital, which I can deal with.

"The one thing every college football fan wants you can probably create for less than it takes to buy a baseball team."

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Cuban said he envisions either a 12- or 16-team playoff field with the higher seeds getting homefield advantage. The homefield advantage, Cuban said, would ensure the college football regular-season games would not lose any importance.

I haven't looked at the playoff system in depth or anything but I've heard that anything over 4 or 8 teams minimizes the importance of the regular season and that's at least partly what makes college football what it is

If a playoff system can keep every week meaningful and still provide some kind of playoff system then I'm all for it

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I have always said that the same BCS system could co-exist with a playoff system. A +1 or +2 system would be a perfect fit. You simply match the top teams that come out of the bowls and have a mini-playoff, that's the only way we can determine a true NC.

Remember when LSU and USC shared the NC, had there been a +1 or a +2, all of those arguments of who's really the NC would have been settled on the playing field. But the almighty NCAA wanted no part of it.

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I have always said that the same BCS system could co-exist with a playoff system. A +1 or +2 system would be a perfect fit. You simply match the top teams that come out of the bowls and have a mini-playoff, that's the only way we can determine a true NC.

Remember when LSU and USC shared the NC, had there been a +1 or a +2, all of those arguments of who's really the NC would have been settled on the playing field. But the almighty NCAA wanted no part of it.

yeah I agree with you on that, a plus 1 (or 2) could work out really well

I hope Cuban doesn't become the most unpopular man in America because he messes with something that is tolerable (CFB as it stands today) and makes it like another pro sports league

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I haven't looked at the playoff system in depth or anything but I've heard that anything over 4 or 8 teams minimizes the importance of the regular season and that's at least partly what makes college football what it is

If a playoff system can keep every week meaningful and still provide some kind of playoff system then I'm all for it

The regular season isn't meaningful, though. You can lose twice, and still win the NC, even when you arguably aren't even the best team in your conference(LSU, when UGA would have, and did, beat the crap out of them, in 2008).

You can also go undefeated in the SEC, and not even get a shot: AU in 2004

How is that meaningful?

I get what you're saying, in that every game feels important....but the reason it feels important is because we REALLY want to see our team win every game. CFB is so much about "my team is better than yours", you're still going to want to win JUST as much, every game. And with homefield advantage on the line, and possibly even a bye....yeah, its still pretty important...assuming they don't add any more games to the regular season.

Now, 16 teams....That's too much. The no.16 team in the country really doesn't deserve a shot. But I think a 12 team playoff, or a 10 team playoff(putting the no 1 and 2 overall teams in different 5 team brackets, and basically giving them 2 byes and have them play whoever wins out amongst the other 4) would be the best thing to ever happen to college football.

The problem with the current system is that luck and chance of any one game can go so far towards determining a champion, and additionally, who you schedule matters SO much, and yet it isn't really taken that much into account.

BSU, regardless of how good they are, should never even be mentioned as a NC candidate with their schedule....but here's the thing, I'm fine with giving them their shot as a lower seed in a playoff. They just don't get to play crap all year and then waltz into ONE game where the other team is beat to **** from playing the SEC/BIG !!/ETC all year, and just have to win that one game. If you're going to play a crappy schedule, you still get to prove you belong as the NC< but you need to go through more than one team to do it, just like everyone else does. Playoff would REALLY level the playing field there, in a way that is fair both to BSU, and to the other major powers.

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Pickle you raise some really good points, especially about the importance of games being determined by our desire as fans.

I guess the only think I DONT want is for CFB to turn into the NFL, where games can mean absolutely nothing late in the season (or the middle, for that matter) because a team has already locked up a spot in the playoffs or locked themselves out by playing poorly

To be fair, playing Idaho St. between UF and AU wasn't very meaningful so thats something to consider I guess

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Personally, I wouldn't want anymore than 8 teams if they were to do a playoff. If you start going much below that, you'll be bringing in potentially 3-4 loss teams, or a bunch teams from crap conferences that don't play anyone all year. While I'm not a huge fan of things now, I do like that the entire body of work is a big part of the picture.

Also this quote by Cuban was a little odd to me:

"Put $500 million in the bank and go to all the schools and pay them money as an option," Cuban said. "Say, 'Look, I'm going to give you X amount every five years. In exchange, you say if you're picked for the playoff system, you'll go.' "

So what happens if School A or Conference A says no? But school A is ranked #1. Are they just excluded from this playoff then? Do we have a playoff champion and a BCS champion?

If we did go that route of a playoff, I want Full buy-in from all D1 schools/conferences.

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Pickle you raise some really good points, especially about the importance of games being determined by our desire as fans.

I guess the only think I DONT want is for CFB to turn into the NFL, where games can mean absolutely nothing late in the season (or the middle, for that matter) because a team has already locked up a spot in the playoffs or locked themselves out by playing poorly

To be fair, playing Idaho St. between UF and AU wasn't very meaningful so thats something to consider I guess

Oh, I agree with you. But I just think the process will take care of itself.

Why is the NFL like that(and I agree it is, it's great, but just not quite what CFB is)?

1. Too many games. I want more games, personally, just so football will last longer, but when you play 16 games, the individual ones just aren't quite as important as when you play 12 regular season games.

2. Here's the big one: Voting. In the NFL, the top 12 teams who go to a playoff are NOT voted in. If they're a couple games up, and it's the last game of the season, they can just rest everbody, get blown out, and still waltz in, without even losing their seeding.

In CFB, if Texas was the no. 3 team in the country, with 2 games left, and wanted to rest some guys or not go as hard, they'd probably get beat twice, and either ruin their seeding, or drop out of the top 16 completely. One loss will drop you a lot further in the rankings based off perception by voters, than one numerical loss in the NFL.

And I like that :)

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I haven't looked at the playoff system in depth or anything but I've heard that anything over 4 or 8 teams minimizes the importance of the regular season and that's at least partly what makes college football what it is

If a playoff system can keep every week meaningful and still provide some kind of playoff system then I'm all for it

My response isn't directed specifically at you, but is aimed at everyone who thinks a playoff would make the regular season less important. I think that train of thought is way, way off the mark.

In college basketball it is not uncommon to see UNC or Duke faceoff against Kentucky or to see a team like UCLA play another program on the level of a Syracuse. The basketball season starts with the top programs playing a couple of cupcakes who are obviously intended to be "victims of a beatdown". And then they begin to play other out of confrence teams that are on approximately the same level as them, then confrence play finishes out the regular season. But other than those first couple of games, the really good basketball programs play other power teams and they play hard, with the intent of winning.

In football we see multiple instances of powerhouse programs playing 25% or more of their season against out of confrence foes who have no chance of beating them. If we went to a 16 team playoff we would almost certainly see multiple matchups between top flight teams who hope to compete for a national championship. Since football doesn't have season ending confrence tournaments that allows teams to get hot and win their way into the NCAA championship, I think the teams would all know that the regular season still matters greatly. They would still have to fight hard to win all of their confrence games in order to make it to their confrence championship games. A playoff would take away the fear of losing a game due to a strong out of conf. opponent. Coach's would know that they could lose a game and still get to their confrence championship game, which would lead to the NCAA playoffs after that game.

Imagine if UGA, UT, or UF were to play Ohio State and the loser not be nearly eliminated from championship contention due to that single loss. There are so few games in football, that all of them will still matter regardless of whether a playoff system was created. Provided a team can win their confrence games and win their division, they would still make their conference championship game and still have hope of winning a national championship by going through the playoffs. I think the good coach's would look to schedule tougher games in an effort to better prepare their teams to compete for their confrence championship and then make it to the NCAA playoffs.

A playoff system wouldn't lessen the importance of the regular season significantly, if at all IMO. But it would definately free up the head coach's to aggressively schedule stronger opponents in an effort to get their teams mentally tough, and physically prepared to compete against the best teams out there by the time the playoffs arrived.

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Personally, I wouldn't want anymore than 8 teams if they were to do a playoff. If you start going much below that, you'll be bringing in potentially 3-4 loss teams, or a bunch teams from crap conferences that don't play anyone all year. While I'm not a huge fan of things now, I do like that the entire body of work is a big part of the picture.

Also this quote by Cuban was a little odd to me:

So what happens if School A or Conference A says no? But school A is ranked #1. Are they just excluded from this playoff then? Do we have a playoff champion and a BCS champion?

If we did go that route of a playoff, I want Full buy-in from all D1 schools/conferences.

I think full buy in would happen once School A saw that School B was considered the "uncowardly" national champion who actually earned it on the field, whereas School A was more of a paper champion.

Recruits would start gravitating to the schools that signed on to this as well, if its done right. Within a couple years, it would be a "get on the train or get run over" sort of thing.

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I want a playoff so bad I can't stand it, and to say it takes away from the regular season is ridiculous.

Right now it would be so badass to see

#1 Auburn vs #16 Alabama

#2 Oregon vs #15 Nevada

#3 TCU vs #14 Oklahoma St

#4 Stanford vs #13 Virginia Tech

#5 Wisconsin vs #12 Missouri

#6 Ohio St vs #11 LSU

#7 Oklahoma vs #10 Boise St

#8 Arkansas vs #9 Michigan St

Name a week of College Football that has ever been this good. I would break my remote trying to watch all of that

Edit: and to the person above that says Boise St. should never be considered for the National Championship due to schedule, then you should protest Oregon because Boise State's Strength of Schedule was ranked higher than Oregon's this year

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I'd prefer it if he just saved that money and bought the Braves.

Amen to that. The Phills are buying themselves the pennant and we're just standing around. Liberty Media needs to open up the wallet and snatch us a solid outfielder, otherwise we will not compete with those dang Phills.

Anything official on the Uggla extention?

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Amen to that. The Phills are buying themselves the pennant and we're just standing around. Liberty Media needs to open up the wallet and snatch us a solid outfielder, otherwise we will not compete with those dang Phills.

Anything official on the Uggla extention?

Nothing official, but I'd expect it by the end of next week. Looks like it'll be 5 years, $60m.

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Shocker of the century here folks...

BCS director doubts Mark Cuban

NEW YORK -- BCS executive director Bill Hancock doubts "financial inducements," such as the one Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban is considering, will lead to a major college football playoff.

Cuban told ESPNDallas.com on Wednesday that he was "actively interested but in the exploratory stage" of trying to bankroll a 12- or 16-team playoff to replace the controversial Bowl Championship Series.

Hancock responded to Cuban's comments in an e-mail to the AP on Thursday, saying, "Given how much support our current system has among university presidents, athletics directors, coaches and athletes, I don't think any amount of financial inducement will make people abandon" the BCS.

Cuban, who has made unsuccessful attempts to buy the Chicago Cubs and Texas Rangers in recent years, said he's spoken to two athletic directors from conferences with automatic BCS bids who were enthusiastic about his idea. He intends to contact several school presidents and state senators to determine whether the idea is worth pursuing.

"Put $500 million in the bank and go to all the schools and pay them money as an option," Cuban said. "Say, 'Look, I'm going to give you X amount every five years. In exchange, you say if you're picked for the playoff system, you'll go."

The BCS, using polls and computer rankings, matches the top two teams in the country after the regular season in a national title game. No. 1 Auburn and No. 2 Oregon meet on Jan. 10 in Glendale, Ariz.

The BCS is wildly unpopular among fans, but the leadership of the six most powerful conferences -- the Big Ten, Big East, Big 12, ACC, SEC and Pac-10 -- support it and the bowl system, making any radical changes in the near future highly unlikely.

"It speaks to the power and popularity of college football that a successful businessman and innovator like Mark Cuban would have this level of interest in investing in college football," Pac-10 commissioner Larry Scott said in an e-mail.

"But the fact is that college football has never been more popular in its current format, and it's a mistake to assume the impediment to a playoff is money. We could get a lot more money tomorrow from lots of folks by moving to an expansive playoff; this is about a broader set of priorities benefiting schools and student-athletes."

Cuban suggested trying to persuade major donors to college athletic programs to cut off financial support until their presidents approve a playoff system. He said he thinks it would take about three or four years of planning to get a playoff up and running.

He called the BCS "an inefficient business where there's obviously a better way."

"The only thing that's kept them from doing it is a lack of capital," Cuban said, "which I can deal with."

Hancock, of course, disagrees.

"College football is so popular today," he said, "because we have a great regular season and because we have an important bowl tradition that provides a meaningful experience for the students and fans -- all of which would be at risk if this concept were implemented."

Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press

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Pickle you raise some really good points, especially about the importance of games being determined by our desire as fans.

I guess the only think I DONT want is for CFB to turn into the NFL, where games can mean absolutely nothing late in the season (or the middle, for that matter) because a team has already locked up a spot in the playoffs or locked themselves out by playing poorly

To be fair, playing Idaho St. between UF and AU wasn't very meaningful so thats something to consider I guess

CFB is already like the NFL in those terms. It's all about the money. Cuban is right on point. As far as the importance of the regular season. What's the use of so many non-conference games? You can cut back on a couple of those. I hate when they talk about a 4-8 team playoff, because that is basically what the BCS is.

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I want a playoff so bad I can't stand it, and to say it takes away from the regular season is ridiculous.

Right now it would be so badass to see

#1 Auburn vs #16 Alabama

#2 Oregon vs #15 Nevada

#3 TCU vs #14 Oklahoma St

#4 Stanford vs #13 Virginia Tech

#5 Wisconsin vs #12 Missouri

#6 Ohio St vs #11 LSU

#7 Oklahoma vs #10 Boise St

#8 Arkansas vs #9 Michigan St

Name a week of College Football that has ever been this good. I would break my remote trying to watch all of that

Edit: and to the person above that says Boise St. should never be considered for the National Championship due to schedule, then you should protest Oregon because Boise State's Strength of Schedule was ranked higher than Oregon's this year

It's less about player skill, and more about sheer size/toughness. Oregon got hit harder every week than Boise did, even if the teams they played, as a whole, sucked.

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Mark Cuban would make a very interesting MLB team owner.

I can see it now:

Mark Cuban jumping onto the field to argue balls and strikes with the ump and ultimately getting tossed only to get a roaring standing ovation.

Mark Cuban rushing the mound because the star player on his team just got nailed in the back.

Mark Cuban rushing out to home plate to join in the celebratory mob after a game winning home run.

I must admit that it would be funny to watch, but the rest of the owners and MLB want no part of Cuban.

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