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Something that stands out to me regarding the AJ Green situation


Xnex
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We've all debated the suspension of AJ, and the fairness or lack of fairness associated with the number of games he will be forced to sit out. And what makes this much more upsetting is the "Seeming" inequality of the punishment he received when compared to other players who have been suspended.

What bothers me is a belief that I have which tells me that the NCAA is passively threatening any program that publically discusses or questions the validity of those suspensions. In my mind the NCAA is not simply "asking" these programs not to say anything publically, they are kind of implying that if these schools do say anything the sanctions might be worse.

So basically this "supreme ruler" is handing out judgements and punishments while also saying "if you make a big deal of this, or if you try to embarrass us over this we will make it worse for you". So they allow themselves to sit in judgement, while attempting to intimidate the programs into accepting the punishments in silence, thus rendering their decisions unreviewable, and making them unaccountable to anyone as far as being made to explain in detail why certain players are hit much harder than other ones.

This allows the NCAA to go from being a policing organization to becoming a predatory group that rules through intimidation without recourse for any overstepping that they may do.

And that's what really "grinds my gears". B)

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It's why people year in and year out lust for too many undefeated teams to end the season. People want controversy, because they want the system to break. I'm one of them. I hate the current college football system in general. The whole thing stinks of politics and dirty money and what makes it worse is that these are schools we are talking about.

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It's why people year in and year out lust for too many undefeated teams to end the season. People want controversy, because they want the system to break. I'm one of them. I hate the current college football system in general. The whole thing stinks of politics and dirty money and what makes it worse is that these are schools we are talking about.

The only evidence you need of it being corrupt is how all other NCAA football levels manage to have successful playoffs with very little controversy year in and out. There are AQ's in other divisions as well as wild card spots, the system would work, it's just a matter of corporations and big money getting in the way.

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The NCAA has always operated that way. Any time you have a powerful authority that answers to no one, there's the possibility of abuse of power. People are afraid to protest abuses because they fear repercussions. Those systems are unstable long term, because the abuses and resentment grow over time until a revolt occurs.

I don't have a problem with the NCAA's punishment for AJ, if they could thoroughly explain the basis for it. If they can't do that, or won't because they don't care about the perception of inequity, then this case incrementally adds to the stack of chips of resentment towards the NCAA. Eventually they'll overplay their hand and lose everything in a flash.

Edited by CalDawg
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I had to steal this from EDSBS because its very relevant to this:

Classic Totalitarian Strategy

No, seriously. It’s exactly what the NCAA has adopted. To wit:

1) Make pretty much everything illegal.

2) Implement #1 with rules as convoluted and contradictory and incoherent as possible.

3) Thanks to #1 and #2, pretty much everybody will be a criminal at some point in every single day they are alive.

4) Treat everyone with the contempt they deserve because of #3. But single out some—at apparent random—and mete out widely varying punishments to make examples, confuse, demoralize, and appall—again, at apparent random.

5) Let some particularly heinous offenders off the hook completely, and make no secret of it. This will not only spread bafflement and dismay, but reinforce the understanding your regime is not one of laws but of men, and the appreciation that your power to either grant favors or single out individuals for punishment is entirely arbitrary and capricious.

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I had to steal this from EDSBS because its very relevant to this:

Classic Totalitarian Strategy

No, seriously. It’s exactly what the NCAA has adopted. To wit:

1) Make pretty much everything illegal.

2) Implement #1 with rules as convoluted and contradictory and incoherent as possible.

3) Thanks to #1 and #2, pretty much everybody will be a criminal at some point in every single day they are alive.

4) Treat everyone with the contempt they deserve because of #3. But single out some—at apparent random—and mete out widely varying punishments to make examples, confuse, demoralize, and appall—again, at apparent random.

5) Let some particularly heinous offenders off the hook completely, and make no secret of it. This will not only spread bafflement and dismay, but reinforce the understanding your regime is not one of laws but of men, and the appreciation that your power to either grant favors or single out individuals for punishment is entirely arbitrary and capricious.

I believe this is the single best definition of NCAA policy I have ever read. You sir just made my day and cleared up any remaining questions we may have had. :D

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The NCAA has always operated that way. Any time you have a powerful authority that answers to no one, there's the possibility of abuse of power. People are afraid to protest abuses because they fear repercussions. Those systems are unstable long term, because the abuses and resentment grow over time until a revolt occurs.

I don't have a problem with the NCAA's punishment for AJ, if they could thoroughly explain the basis for it. If they can't do that, or won't because they don't care about the perception of inequity, then this case incrementally adds to the stack of chips of resentment towards the NCAA. Eventually they'll overplay their hand and lose everything in a flash.

That is my thinking as well. If we could just get the details on why this suspension is much more extreme than the other ones I think that could help quiet some of the screaming. But the NCAa seems to be that kid that puts his fingers in his hears and screams aloud whenever someone begins to question their reasoning. If more information were made available it might go a long way toward getting this thing behind them.

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I had to steal this from EDSBS because its very relevant to this:

Classic Totalitarian Strategy

No, seriously. It’s exactly what the NCAA has adopted. To wit:

1) Make pretty much everything illegal.

2) Implement #1 with rules as convoluted and contradictory and incoherent as possible.

3) Thanks to #1 and #2, pretty much everybody will be a criminal at some point in every single day they are alive.

4) Treat everyone with the contempt they deserve because of #3. But single out some—at apparent random—and mete out widely varying punishments to make examples, confuse, demoralize, and appall—again, at apparent random.

5) Let some particularly heinous offenders off the hook completely, and make no secret of it. This will not only spread bafflement and dismay, but reinforce the understanding your regime is not one of laws but of men, and the appreciation that your power to either grant favors or single out individuals for punishment is entirely arbitrary and capricious.

that is pretty much it..

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The NCAA has always operated that way. Any time you have a powerful authority that answers to no one, there's the possibility of abuse of power. People are afraid to protest abuses because they fear repercussions. Those systems are unstable long term, because the abuses and resentment grow over time until a revolt occurs.

I don't have a problem with the NCAA's punishment for AJ, if they could thoroughly explain the basis for it. If they can't do that, or won't because they don't care about the perception of inequity, then this case incrementally adds to the stack of chips of resentment towards the NCAA. Eventually they'll overplay their hand and lose everything in a flash.

I wouldn't say they've always operated the same way as they do now, but that simply has to do with technology. It's much easier to hunt these types of situations down compared to even 10-20 years ago. Phone and internet records are very easy to obtain and they're more detailed compared to even a few years ago. Even a simple thing like a plane ticket is much easier to track because very few if any airlines accept cash for tickets on a regular basis.

I don't see a revolt happening simply because not enough people care enough to pursue the issue. The games are still entertaining despite the NCAA and that's truly all people really care about when it comes down to it.

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I wouldn't say they've always operated the same way as they do now, but that simply has to do with technology. It's much easier to hunt these types of situations down compared to even 10-20 years ago. Phone and internet records are very easy to obtain and they're more detailed compared to even a few years ago. Even a simple thing like a plane ticket is much easier to track because very few if any airlines accept cash for tickets on a regular basis.

I don't see a revolt happening simply because not enough people care enough to pursue the issue. The games are still entertaining despite the NCAA and that's truly all people really care about when it comes down to it.

Sad, but true, although there is a growing sentiment of dissent out there.

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Here's all you need to know about the hypocracy of the NCAA.

NCAA President Myles Brand for the '06-07 FY "received compensation of more than $935,000,"

And that was 4 years ago, you figure a 4% per year raise and it will be closer to $1,094,000 for the new "King of College Athletics".

Non-profit.........

2235_dr_evil_right_thumb.jpg

Edited by Deacon 13
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I had to steal this from EDSBS because its very relevant to this:

Classic Totalitarian Strategy

No, seriously. It’s exactly what the NCAA has adopted. To wit:

1) Make pretty much everything illegal.

2) Implement #1 with rules as convoluted and contradictory and incoherent as possible.

3) Thanks to #1 and #2, pretty much everybody will be a criminal at some point in every single day they are alive.

4) Treat everyone with the contempt they deserve because of #3. But single out some—at apparent random—and mete out widely varying punishments to make examples, confuse, demoralize, and appall—again, at apparent random.

5) Let some particularly heinous offenders off the hook completely, and make no secret of it. This will not only spread bafflement and dismay, but reinforce the understanding your regime is not one of laws but of men, and the appreciation that your power to either grant favors or single out individuals for punishment is entirely arbitrary and capricious.

This is also the recipe for our government and, in a different way, even for corporate America.

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