Jump to content

Ryan Kerrigan


hawkeye
 Share

Recommended Posts

Kyle Rudolph*/TE/Notre Dame: Rudolph showed reliable hands and helped the Irish get off to a quick start, catching four passes during the first quarter. Yet, it was his blocking that really stood out, as Rudolph looked dominant run blocking and in pass protection. He consistently handled Purdue's Ryan Kerrigan, one of the nation's best pass rushers, in one-on-one assignments.

Dont get me wrong.. I like Ryan Kerrigan... I just dont see him as a 1st round product... I see him as a 3rd round guy (maybe late 2nd round)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm certainly no expert, but I hope that Kerrigan is a late second rounder.

Watched the Notre Dame game and Rudolph was the only blocker that handled him, which was surprising after watching Kerrigan go past the right tackle consistently.

I don't know how many sacks Kerrigan got in the game (by my memory, he got at least one sack, at least two tackles for loss, and one forced fumble), but he should get an assist for one of the other ones. The running back came over to help out on Kerrigan instead of picking up the blitzer.

Overall a great performance by Kerrigan.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Player of the Week - September 4, 2010

DE Ryan Kerrigan, Purdue 6-4 / 263 / 4.82 -- opponent: Notre Dame

With Brian Kelly bringing an even higher tempo offense to Notre Dame than Charlie Weis' there was reason to think Kerrigan, who finished 3rd in the country last year with 13 sacks, might be contained. Instead, he led the Boilermakers with 7 tackles, 2.5 tackles for loss, a sack and a forced fumble. Kerrigan lined up most of the game at his typical left defensive end position in the 4-3 alignment, but he was also moved to the right side. From either spot, he was consistently pushing the pocket. Kerrigan has good burst off the snap and accelerates throughout his rush. He doesn't have elite flexibility, but can dip his shoulder, rip through the tackle's out-stretched arms, and turn the corner. Good hand technique, overall. Quick hands and good hand-eye coordination to knock the ball away. Forced 7 fumbles in 2010 and, despite still being blocked by RT, knocked the ball out of Notre Dame QB Dayne Crist's hand for a fumble in the first quarter. Good size and leg drive for the bull rush. At least effective upper body strength, but can get locked up. With greater explosiveness, he could improve his club, hip toss techniques. Works hard to keep contain and generally has enough size and strength to set the edge. Lacks the bulk and power to consistently hold up to double-teams, however. Instinctive. Locates the ball quickly and pursues with passion.

http://rob-rang.blogs.cbssports.com/mcc/blogs/view/13682485

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dont get me wrong.. I like Ryan Kerrigan... I just dont see him as a 1st round product... I see him as a 3rd round guy (maybe late 2nd round)

If Kerrigan has another year like last year (and he's started off pretty good!), then there is no way he goes in the third, and very unlikely that he's available at our 2nd round pick. I'd expect him to go in the top 50 picks - I wouldn't even be surprised if he sneaked into the 1st round.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Honestly, I think he is going to be a clone of Biermann at BEST in the NFL (although Biermann is a little faster/quicker).

I just wouldn't spend a 1st or even 2nd round pick on a guy who is basically a clone of what we already have.

If we get a DE in this years draft, I would rather him be more of a high upside guy like Sidbury. Even in that case, Abraham is here for another year and Biermann/Sidbury are going to be receiving the bulk of the snaps alongside/behind him. Unless neither of those two guys rise up to the challenge, then I would like to consider a DE earlier in the draft.

I think we have enough "role" DEs. We need a guy who is going to, along with Sidbury, try to replace Abe's production when he leaves.

For me, it's either grab a big-time DE in the first round (which is highly unlikely for one to fall to the late 1st) or grab a high upside DE between the 2nd and 5th rounds.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Honestly, I think he is going to be a clone of Biermann at BEST in the NFL (although Biermann is a little faster/quicker).

I just wouldn't spend a 1st or even 2nd round pick on a guy who is basically a clone of what we already have.

If we get a DE in this years draft, I would rather him be more of a high upside guy like Sidbury. Even in that case, Abraham is here for another year and Biermann/Sidbury are going to be receiving the bulk of the snaps alongside/behind him. Unless neither of those two guys rise up to the challenge, then I would like to consider a DE earlier in the draft.

I think we have enough "role" DEs. We need a guy who is going to, along with Sidbury, try to replace Abe's production when he leaves.

For me, it's either grab a big-time DE in the first round (which is highly unlikely for one to fall to the late 1st) or grab a high upside DE between the 2nd and 5th rounds.

I agree.... I love some Kroy Biermann but you dont need 2 of those type guys... I agree i rather draft another athletic type DE

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree.... I love some Kroy Biermann but you dont need 2 of those type guys... I agree i rather draft another athletic type DE

Kerrigan is bigger than Kroy right now. He is also more athletic and better against the run than Kroy was coming out. 6-4, nearly 270lbs and running a 4.70-4.80 forty is pretty athletic.

Obviously Kroy has come on leaps and bounds since then, but as college prospects the only similar traits they had was a relentless motor.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kerrigan is bigger than Kroy right now. He is also more athletic and better against the run than Kroy was coming out. 6-4, nearly 270lbs and running a 4.70-4.80 forty is pretty athletic.

Obviously Kroy has come on leaps and bounds since then, but as college prospects the only similar traits they had was a relentless motor.

I agree.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I understand what you are saying, but I think Kroy has the potential to be a 10+ sacks a season type of guy. Kerrigan probably has more upside than Kroy had coming out.

If Kroy is a 10+sack guy, (which I think he is more around 7+) how much better could Kerrigan really be?

I define many DEs in really two categories:

1. You have the elite guys who have top speed/quickness/athleticism. These type guys are usually the players with the most upside at the position. Basically, when these guys get the mental part of the game and improve their technique/hand usage, they are virtually unstoppable. i.e. Demarcus Ware, Dwight Freeney, & Elvis Dumerville

2. Then you have the high motor guys who usually get most of their sacks from relentless effort. They are definitely great guys to have, but they usually are not going to be putting up double digit sack totals annually.

I put Kerrigan/Biermann in that #2 category. They may not have been the same size coming out of college, but what they make a living off of in the NFL is going to be virtually the same..... High relentless effort in both the Run and Pass game.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wrote about this during the summer and in a recent post

I did a post about this earlier this offseason... I was talking to a former scout that runs a website and he basically said the samething... He likes Kroy Biermann (thinks he will be a good DE) but he thinks Sid has the potential to be a DE and will be (in the long run) .

I dont think its about saying Biermann is so limited that he cant be a great DE.

Thier are normally 3 types of rushers.

1. The physical freak type DE.. Big, fast, and strong (Julius Peppers, Justin Tuck, and Mario Williams type) *rare*

2. You have your speed rushers (Abe, Freeney type)

3. You have your high motor / high effort (Patrick Kerney, Kyle Vanden Bosch type)

If you got any of these guys (in their prime)... you are lucky.. All of these guys are good DE's.... Saying that.... Normally your Freak of nature DE's and your Speed rushers are one man wrecking crew... They normally an do their thing regardless (ofcourse everyone has down years here and there) ... With high effort/high motor guys... You know what you are going to get... A guy that leaves it all out there but a high effort guy i just that because normally their sacks come on there 2nd moves (not giving up) .

Effort guys are normally Robins (not Batmans) ... They normally have their best seasons when another guy is having a great season...

Now there are exceptions... His name is Jared Allen... Jared Allen is in that high motor group but he is faster then your normal high effort guy (like PK) .... He does not have speed rusher speed like but he is somewhere in the middle between high motor and speed rusher.. I think Biermann has more speed then your normal high motor guy also... Not going to say the guy is Jared Allen but he has what it takes to be an impact DE.

So yea.. When Pat said some in the Falcons organization think Sidbury has a better upside its because athletically he fits in that speed rusher category... That doesnt mean they dont think Kroy Biermann wont be an **** of a DE. They are just fit in 2 different categories.

I'm just impressed TD found 2 young totally different DE's in those 3 categories that looks like they are developing into 2 really good DE's... Whats mostly impressive is both are former FCS prospects...

Saying that... I think Kerrigan is stouter then Kroy but i think Kroy is quicker.

Hakim i also kinda agree with you... Can Kroy get 10 sacks... yes... But i see him more as a 8 sack guy... Thats still impressive and really really good for the LDE position.

I like Kerrigan and i wouldnt mind getting him but i think we need a different type DE.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If Kroy is a 10+sack guy, (which I think he is more around 7+) how much better could Kerrigan really be?

I define many DEs in really two categories:

1. You have the elite guys who have top speed/quickness/athleticism. These type guys are usually the players with the most upside at the position. Basically, when these guys get the mental part of the game and improve their technique/hand usage, they are virtually unstoppable. i.e. Demarcus Ware, Dwight Freeney, & Elvis Dumerville

2. Then you have the high motor guys who usually get most of their sacks from relentless effort. They are definitely great guys to have, but they usually are not going to be putting up double digit sack totals annually.

I put Kerrigan/Biermann in that #2 category. They may not have been the same size coming out of college, but what they make a living off of in the NFL is going to be virtually the same..... High relentless effort in both the Run and Pass game.

I said coming out of college he probably has more upside than Kroy. Kroy was what 6-3, 240LBS running a 4.8 forty. Also coming from a small school. Obviously TD found a gem!

I can see Kroy having between 8-12 sacks this year, and think Kerrigan would be that type of DE. He's never gonna have a monster year like Dumerville or Ware though, so from that point I agree.

But we have Sidbury, who has as much upside as a Michael Johnson, or JPP or Greg Romeus. But none of these players would play in our sub package. Whereas Kerrigan, whose stout against the run, could play in the sub package and on third downs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I said coming out of college he probably has more upside than Kroy. Kroy was what 6-3, 240LBS running a 4.8 forty. Also coming from a small school. Obviously TD found a gem!

I can see Kroy having between 8-12 sacks this year, and think Kerrigan would be that type of DE. He's never gonna have a monster year like Dumerville or Ware though, so from that point I agree.

But we have Sidbury, who has as much upside as a Michael Johnson, or JPP or Greg Romeus. But none of these players would play in our sub package. Whereas Kerrigan, whose stout against the run, could play in the sub package and on third downs.

I'm not worried about our base package... I feel like you can teach stoutness in the run game with time... You cant teach god given ability... Lets be real... The way we have been with our DE's coming from the draft lately... We basically sith them there 1st year... They dont play no more then 15% of the plays during their rookie year.

I see us drafting a DE in 2 instances...

1. If Kroy Biermann nor Sidbury step up... We will grab one of the top DE's.

2. If Kroy and Sid step up... DER is not a big need so we take a guy mid round that we can develop... Normally thos guys are speed rushers.

I look at last year..When we couldnt get neither of the top guys... We tried to draft 6'2 250lbs Arthur Moats (4.64 40) but the bills snatched him up. link

I really think Sid and Kroy will develop so i have us getting a DE in the 3rd or4th round in my latest mock

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I said coming out of college he probably has more upside than Kroy. Kroy was what 6-3, 240LBS running a 4.8 forty. Also coming from a small school. Obviously TD found a gem!

I can see Kroy having between 8-12 sacks this year, and think Kerrigan would be that type of DE. He's never gonna have a monster year like Dumerville or Ware though, so from that point I agree.

But we have Sidbury, who has as much upside as a Michael Johnson, or JPP or Greg Romeus. But none of these players would play in our sub package. Whereas Kerrigan, whose stout against the run, could play in the sub package and on third downs.

The sub package is where guys like Davis and JA98 come in. It comes down to what you would want from a new DE?

If Kerrigan doesn't have the potential to have a big year like that, why draft him over someone who possibly could? This especially considering that him and Kroy have similar skill sets.

Basically, I would rather have two Sidbury type talents on our team as opposed to two Biermann type talents. This is simply because guys like Sidbury do have the potential to put up huge numbers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know this was against W. Illinois, but he is balling out. If he keeps this up he might just get into the 1st rd. I don't care if he is similar to Kroy or whoever, as long as he can rush the QB and play the run. That's a

DE's job. IMO that only applies to WR's, RB's, and maybe CB's. But at DE it don't matter how they get to the QB.

http://www.jconline.com/article/20100912/SPORTS020101/9120351/Leathernecks-get-to-know-Purdue-s-Kerrigan

When Purdue's athletic department begins to compile and distribute material for defensive end Ryan Kerrigan's postseason accolades, Western Illinois will be a perfect source.

While the Boilermakers' 31-21 victory Saturday against the Leathernecks in Ross-Ade Stadium was less than inspiring, the 6-foot-4, 263-pound Kerrigan was.

Four tackles for loss, 12 total tackles, a sack and a forced fumble. Kerrigan now ranks 11th in Purdue history with 371/2 career tackles for loss.

"He is a **** of player," Western Illinois right tackle Mike Lamphear said of the defender he attempted to block all day. "He goes 100 percent from whistle to whistle. He doesn't take a play off.

"He is one of the strongest defensive ends I've ever gone against. It gave me great experience. He is a little bit faster than I anticipated. I'm glad I won't have to block him again. He is a great player."

Kerrigan, who criticized his own play after the Sept. 4 loss at Notre Dame, was more satisfied after the home opener.

"I did better today," Kerrigan said. "I think we all did better. I'm my own worst critic, like any athlete.

"You always think there are plays you could've done better, like a lot of the sacks I should've had today."

Western Illinois coach Mark Hendrickson joked that he isn't quite sure which number Kerrigan -- 94 -- wears.

"What number was he?" Hendrickson said smiling. "He almost was our fullback considering that he was in our backfield so much. I've done this a long time, and you can't be much better than him."

Through two games, Kerrigan has 19 tackles.

"I don't know if there is a better player on the defensive line in America than him," Hendrickson said. "He is big and quick. He almost can jump by you with the snap. I would almost say our tackles still did a good job on him to be able to execute offensively as well as we did.

"He is as good as I can ever remember seeing. He made a difference in the outcome of the game. He is a difference-maker and such a great effort player. He doesn't take downs off. He is 100 miles an hour, full motor, all the time. He is amazing. You can't find a better guy than that one."

Western Illinois quarterback Matt Barr, who completed 25 of 38 passes for 286 yards and a touchdown, said the Leathernecks tried not to let Kerrigan dictate their offensive game plan.

"There are 11 on our side of the ball, so we're not going to try to run away from him, but he does make things difficult," Barr said. "Whether he was on the weak side or the strong side, he was in there making plays.

"He is a really good player who is strong and quick. He was in there pretty quick a couple of times. He is very fast for a big guy. Luckily, I was able to be elusive enough to get outside the pocket and get the ball downfield a little."

Purdue defensive tackle Kawann Short said Kerrigan's play continues to inspire the Boilermakers.

"That was pretty much the whole game," Short said. "We couldn't leave it all up to him. We had to do work, too."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...