Jump to content

Agent's firing back at Saban for his comments.


SacFalcFan
 Share

Recommended Posts

Before #Saban hurls insults at #agents he best check to see the dirt they have on him. He's as clean as a bed bug. Starts in #college.

Joe Schad had this earlier today, but it's not there now. He said he spoke to an agent who said "why is he (saban) so concerned about me talking to player X? He's been recruiting him since he was 14"

I have been reading many other tweets about it. Saban (i guess calling them pimps ticked them off than calling them predators by meyer) has really stirred up a hornet's nest.

Per Saban's "pimp" comments about agents, what was his agent doing when he left LSU 4 the NFL & then left Miami for Alabama? Baking cookies?

There is not an offseason with college football. Oh man we can't have a week without some type of controversy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Love Saban's and Meyer's comments on rogue agents. Glad somebody in college football has the guts to take them on. They have been ruining things for college kids for awhile and they give agents who do things the right way a bad name. As Saban said, his only beef is with the agents who are preying on these young kids while they are still amateur athletes. That is not good for those players, the NFL, and especially college football.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Love Saban's and Meyer's comments on rogue agents. Glad somebody in college football has the guts to take them on. They have been ruining things for college kids for awhile and they give agents who do things the right way a bad name. As Saban said, his only beef is with the agents who are preying on these young kids while they are still amateur athletes. That is not good for those players, the NFL, and especially college football.

'm glad Saban said it as well. It's true afterall. And which agent would possibly know if Saban is trying to recruit a 14 year old kid, unless said agent has already approached the kid about being his agent? It's obvious to me that Saban is speaking only about the agents that do these things to get to kids before it is allowed. He wasn't indicting all agents.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now would either of these two be saying anything if it didn't affect their programs???

of course they wouldn't.. they wouldn't be saying a thing about it. It's selective outrage and IMO CMR is right on this it's no worse than it was before. This has been happening for decades, but the big difference is you have things like twitter and facebook where in the past you didn't.

On 1st and 10 today they talked about the pimp reference being extremely insulting and wrong (there is no comparison at all that makes that term right here) and they talked about the exploitation of the players isn't being done by just the agents, that's why you don't use that term because at least the agents want the players to be paid.

Article

Don't look for fake "outrage" by Mark Richt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Am I the only person who sees a holier-than-thou attitude from Saban at these SEC meetings. I've always been a big Saban fan but its starting to get ridiculous.

"Pimp" are you kidding me. Coming from a guy who bolted from LSU and Miami. I don't really care about the different jobs, I get it, its business. But to turn around and attack agents as if you have been an ethical human being your whole life. Pot meet kettle. Think about the kids left behind at LSU and the Dolphins players.

If you caught the "10 at 10" from Chip on the Ajc, you will find another nugget. He goes on and on about rising juniors showing up at his camps with multiple offers from other institutions. Yet Saban and staff no longer offers rising juniors, and we're supposed to believe him. Come on already, I wouldn't even believe Coach Richt on that one, and I think the world of Coach Richt.

Sac has already documented the issue with Saban vs. Mullen on offense philosophies.

This guy Saban is really starting to annoy the **** out of me. Again, this is nothing against Saban or the Bammers, I have all the respect in the world for what he has accomplished. Someone needs to tell him to tone it down a bit. Dude is starting to sound like Lane Kiffin.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Am I the only person who sees a holier-than-thou attitude from Saban at these SEC meetings. I've always been a big Saban fan but its starting to get ridiculous.

"Pimp" are you kidding me. Coming from a guy who bolted from LSU and Miami. I don't really care about the different jobs, I get it, its business. But to turn around and attack agents as if you have been an ethical human being your whole life. Pot meet kettle. Think about the kids left behind at LSU and the Dolphins players.

If you caught the "10 at 10" from Chip on the Ajc, you will find another nugget. He goes on and on about rising juniors showing up at his camps with multiple offers from other institutions. Yet Saban and staff no longer offers rising juniors, and we're supposed to believe him. Come on already, I wouldn't even believe Coach Richt on that one, and I think the world of Coach Richt.

Sac has already documented the issue with Saban vs. Mullen on offense philosophies.

This guy Saban is really starting to annoy the **** out of me. Again, this is nothing against Saban or the Bammers, I have all the respect in the world for what he has accomplished. Someone needs to tell him to tone it down a bit. Dude is starting to sound like Lane Kiffin.

Again, I think Saban, Meyer, and anybody else railing on the rogue agents is dead on accurate. Neither Saban nor Meyer are attacking the good agents who do things the right way -- the problem is these guys going after kids with elibility left. They know that is against the rules and do it anyway because there are no repurcussions as of now for their actions.

And, for the record, I have had a problem with this for years -- going back to 1992 when a sports agent got a signature from Antonia Langham on a cocktail napkin to represent him in the future. Again, preying on kids who they know have eligibility left. And this type of conduct is certainly not exclusive to Alabama, the SEC, or college football players specifally -- it is across the board in amateur athletics.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Again, I think Saban, Meyer, and anybody else railing on the rogue agents is dead on accurate. Neither Saban nor Meyer are attacking the good agents who do things the right way -- the problem is these guys going after kids with elibility left. They know that is against the rules and do it anyway because there are no repurcussions as of now for their actions.

And, for the record, I have had a problem with this for years -- going back to 1992 when a sports agent got a signature from Antonia Langham on a cocktail napkin to represent him in the future. Again, preying on kids who they know have eligibility left. And this type of conduct is certainly not exclusive to Alabama, the SEC, or college football players specifally -- it is across the board in amateur athletics.

I get your point of view. But don't kid yourself if you think Saban and Meyer have the best interests of the players. The same coaches who oversign recruits and then have to force some players out to meet scholly numbers. What about when you recruit a kid to come to your school and then a week later you bolt to another job. The agents are snakes, but what agent isn't a snake. That is the nature of their business. Saban and Meyer are just trying to cover themselves, nothing more than a political move in my mind.

Personally, I don't have a problem with a player taking money or benefits from an agent just as long as the agents have no affiliation to any institution. Its the American way of doing business. If you want to invest in a future prospect and bet your money on it, why not? College football is a multi-billion dollar business, it will happen sooner or later.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think way too much is being made about the "pimp" comment and not enough is being made about the credible issue at hand. Agents have been meddling with college kids for years and years, but that in no way makes what they do any less harmful to the entire team and university.

Agents can contact these high profile kids at any time and it's extremely hard for a kid that left his family in a crap neighborhood with little money to go play football on a scholarship. It's hard for a kid that came from nothing to look at someone offering them the sun and the moon and tell them to wait a year or two.

But the player and the agent are not affected by any agreement they make, other than profit on both sides. Meanwhile the university and players that are still playing, most not even getting a shot at the NFL, they get stuck with the consequences of an individual's decision.

I don't know why people bring up Saban and Meyer moving to new jobs in the ways that they have... there were not NCAA violations involved and that's what makes the issue of agents contacting college players legit. Universities cannot control what these kids do on the side. They have to hope that the player knows better and keeps that in mind when they're being offered a great deal of money.

I don't have any problem with a player reaping the benefits of his hard work, that's not the issue. If players received a stipend or something from a general fund, that would be one thing... but they aren't and it is very much against the rules for players to receive special attention from professional level representatives.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think way too much is being made about the "pimp" comment and not enough is being made about the credible issue at hand. Agents have been meddling with college kids for years and years, but that in no way makes what they do any less harmful to the entire team and university.

Agents can contact these high profile kids at any time and it's extremely hard for a kid that left his family in a crap neighborhood with little money to go play football on a scholarship. It's hard for a kid that came from nothing to look at someone offering them the sun and the moon and tell them to wait a year or two.

But the player and the agent are not affected by any agreement they make, other than profit on both sides. Meanwhile the university and players that are still playing, most not even getting a shot at the NFL, they get stuck with the consequences of an individual's decision.

I don't know why people bring up Saban and Meyer moving to new jobs in the ways that they have... there were not NCAA violations involved and that's what makes the issue of agents contacting college players legit. Universities cannot control what these kids do on the side. They have to hope that the player knows better and keeps that in mind when they're being offered a great deal of money.

I don't have any problem with a player reaping the benefits of his hard work, that's not the issue. If players received a stipend or something from a general fund, that would be one thing... but they aren't and it is very much against the rules for players to receive special attention from professional level representatives.

Well said. And for the record, I think the "pimp" comment fits pretty well with the rogue agents. These rogue agents, like pimps, use promises and enticements on the front end, as well as manipulation, to get control over the players so they can ultimately profit from the players' "work." Pretty dang close when you get right down to it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well said. And for the record, I think the "pimp" comment fits pretty well with the rogue agents. These rogue agents, like pimps, use promises and enticements on the front end, as well as manipulation, to get control over the players so they can ultimately profit from the players' "work." Pretty dang close when you get right down to it.

You know that you could replace the wor "pimps" and "agents" and replace them with "Nick Saban" or "Urban Meyer"

Your comment would still hold some truth by making those adjustments.

All kidding aside. Come on man. Do you think that these coaches don't know what's going on?

This investigation is slowly starting to snowball into something that's getting ready to be real ugly. ESPN is now reporting UF being investigated for a separate party. Somehow I believe that pleasing USC is behind this whole witch hunt. Get ready folks, its about to get ugly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Add Bob Stoops to the list of coaches calling out unscrupulous agents. Here is an excerpt and the link to the full article is below:

“I agree with Nick wholeheartedly,” Stoops said. “I mean, something has to start happening to these people, agents and the people representing them, and the players. Otherwise, you’re wasting your time to want to penalize the schools. We don’t want it happening. We do all we can to prevent it and educate and all. But if an individual or couple individuals together collaborate, how are you to prevent that? The penalties have to happen to those involved. And they need to be strong ones, otherwise it isn’t going to stop.”

Stoops concerned about unscrupulous agents

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Saban, as much as I despise him, is spot on with his analysis. As far as them saying stuff about him doing what he did, leaving LSU and Miami. I have one thing to say about that, he's an employee, not a student that stands to lose eligibility. The only thing it costs Saban in his instances is the money to buy the contract out and the fan base he's leaving. As dirty or underhanded as his actions leaving are, they are also covered in some aspect in his contracts. These players are not being paid, or aren't supposed to be anyway. He is a professional coach, these players are student athletes. As much as I hate Saban at times, he didn't miss the mark with this shot. These kids have enough to worry about already, and it should cost agents money for improper contact with them. Yeah, colleges have been recruiting some players since they've been in middle school. They, for the most part, abide by the rules too as far as offering scholarships when the players are eligible to be offered a scholarship. Inviting them to summer camps and stuff like that are all part of their development, and I believe are covered under NCAA rule. As long as they're not breaking recruiting rules, there's no harm in it. ****, look at Eric Berry's little brother. He loved UT so much while his brother was there, he said he was verbally committing to them now, and I think he's in elementary school if I remember right.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Saban, Meyer shift blame to unscrupulous agents.

HOOVER, Ala. - Each year, hordes of committed fans decked out in their favorite team's apparel gather in the Wynfrey Hotel lobby during SEC Media Days with hopes of getting autographs from their favorite coaches and players.

The sad reality is those fans may be far more committed to their teams than some of the players they adore.

Allegations have surfaced in recent days that Alabama defensive end Marcel Dareus and South Carolina tight end Wesley Saunders, among others, attended an agent-thrown party in Miami earlier this summer. In addition, former Florida center Maurkice Pouncey was alleged to have accepted $100,000 from an agent before last season's Sugar Bowl victory over Cincinnati. All of this has come on the heels of reports that as many as five North Carolina defenders may have had illegal contact with agents.

At Media Days on Wednesday, Alabama coach Nick Saban wouldn't answer specific questions about the Dareus situation, but did say the school's compliance office, "in conjunction with the NCAA," is looking into the matter. SEC commissioner Mike Slive said the league office is assisting in the investigation.

Inappropriate contact with an agent and accepting gifts are cardinal sins in college athletics. Either can cause a player to lose eligibility. A program can lose much more; just ask USC, which lost 30 scholarships and a chance to play for championships in the wake of the Reggie Bush scandal.

So, the news that Dareus was involved in an incident that raised questions about who paid for his travel, lodging and food in Miami provoked frustration and outrage from Saban, who's been through something like this before. But the direction of his anger was slightly off-target.

"I think the NFL Players Association has a responsibility to monitor and control what agents do," Saban said Wednesday during his scheduled appearance at SEC Media Days. "I think if an agent does anything to affect the eligibility of a college football player, his license ought to be suspended for a year.

"That's the only way we're going to stop what's happening out there because it's ridiculous and it's entrapment of young people at a very difficult time in their life."

The times may be difficult for players, but deciding whether to accept an illegal flight shouldn't be.

As with every major-college program in the nation, Alabama has a compliance department that - ad nauseum - educates its players about what they can and cannot do. Every college football player in the country knows a free plane trip to a party held by an agent is illegal. Suggesting otherwise would only be perpetuating the dumb jock stereotype.

Saban did acknowledge that players had to be held responsible for their actions, but he still laid most of the blame elsewhere.

"There are a lot of good agents out there that don't do this stuff," he said. "They're not out there chasing guys and giving them money and breaking rules and flying them all over the country, sending girls after them, all kinds of stuff."

Saban suggested college programs could close their campuses to NFL scouts if the league doesn't take an active role against unscrupulous agents. Perhaps Alabama could be proactive and take the lead on that. Until the NFLPA reacts in a manner to its satisfaction, Alabama could stop accommodating NFL scouts.

But that's not likely to happen. It is standard practice in recruiting for programs to tout their records of sending players to the NFL. No use giving the competition an unnecessary edge.

Ironically, while Saban was expressing his opinion, a message flashed on a giant video screen boasting that the SEC had 49 players selected in the most recent NFL draft, more than any other conference in the country.

Saban used the term "pimps" to describe agents with unethical business practices. Florida coach Urban Meyer called them predators.

"I used the term 'predator' because they're there," Meyer said Wednesday during his scheduled Media Days appearance, a few hours after Saban's. "Since my first day at Florida, I've never seen anything like it. We have security for one reason, and that's to make sure that people are away from our players."

Despite those security measures, Meyer said it's unrealistic to completely shield players from agents that might try to tempt them.

"For a coach to figure out who a [agent's] runner is at a nightclub at 2:30 in the morning ... I've been asleep for four hours," he said. "The coaches can't do that. I've tried to."

Florida's Mike Pouncey said his brother did not accept money while playing at Florida.

Obviously, the inability to keep agents away from players can be frustrating for a coach. Still, an agent can't fly a player all over the country if the player doesn't accept the ticket. The agent can't give money if the player isn't willing to take it.

After the 2008 season, Alabama All-America offensive tackle Andre Smith was ruled ineligible for the Sugar Bowl because of contact with an agent. Without him, Alabama lost to Utah 31-17.

Dareus was on that team. He saw the consequences first-hand. He saw how losing a star player can affect a team. Did Dareus forget?

Maybe Dareus did nothing wrong at all. Pouncey denied taking money, and his twin, Mike, Florida's starting center, vouched for him.

"I talked to my brother and it's not true," Mike said at Media Days. "I feel bad about [the allegation] because it ruined somebody's name. Those that know who we are know we're not those kinds of people. We pride ourselves on having a clean name."

If Dareus did break NCAA rules, he potentially faces a multiple-game suspension. Last season, Oklahoma State receiver Dez Bryant was suspended nine games for lying to NCAA investigators about contact with former NFL star Deion Sanders.

The Crimson Tide would be significantly weakened without Dareus; the Tide already must replace nine defensive starters, and Dareus was expected to contend for All-America honors a season after leading the Tide in sacks.

Alabama is trying to become the first team to win consecutive BCS national championships. One loss can mean the difference between playing in the national championship game and watching it. Dareus may have jeopardized his season just to attend a party.

That's really why Saban should be angry.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think way too much is being made about the "pimp" comment and not enough is being made about the credible issue at hand. Agents have been meddling with college kids for years and years, but that in no way makes what they do any less harmful to the entire team and university.

Agents can contact these high profile kids at any time and it's extremely hard for a kid that left his family in a crap neighborhood with little money to go play football on a scholarship. It's hard for a kid that came from nothing to look at someone offering them the sun and the moon and tell them to wait a year or two.

But the player and the agent are not affected by any agreement they make, other than profit on both sides. Meanwhile the university and players that are still playing, most not even getting a shot at the NFL, they get stuck with the consequences of an individual's decision.

I don't know why people bring up Saban and Meyer moving to new jobs in the ways that they have... there were not NCAA violations involved and that's what makes the issue of agents contacting college players legit. Universities cannot control what these kids do on the side. They have to hope that the player knows better and keeps that in mind when they're being offered a great deal of money.

I don't have any problem with a player reaping the benefits of his hard work, that's not the issue. If players received a stipend or something from a general fund, that would be one thing... but they aren't and it is very much against the rules for players to receive special attention from professional level representatives.

not enough is being made for using the pimp statement actually.. there are plenty of other words to use and things to call them then to bring up a term that has no business to be used in this situation. these players are no not victims at all. they aren't held captive, tied up, beat up, and a number of other horrific things being done to them without a say. they are willingly breaking the rules period. again these players aren't victims in this at all.

this has been done for decades (in fact this party has been done for many years) and not anymore than in the past. the big difference is technology and sites like twitter and facebook and items like the iphone and the droid. the reason they found out about this was due to austin and his twitter. i can only imagine what would have been found out in the 80s and 90s if those same athletes had the above items at their disposal. people act like this is new and it isn't. these same coaches screaming are the ones who have benefited from the closeness with agents for years being very disingenuous. bianchi below is right we can see how this is going to play out.. a 2 game suspension at most.. how is that punishment? just like dirty coaches, there are plenty of them, we have dirty agents and neither is good for college football, but don't believe for one minute it's any worse than in the past. the ncaa and the school's haven't decided to make this an open process (players and agents talking) and get involved in the agent process, but instead close their eyes and ears and not do anything about it for years. They want to fix it you have a liason at each school who handles the agent contact with the recruits and at least you would have an open process, but nothing will stop a player from taking money no matter how many times these coaches yell and scream. You will always have runners and you will always have players looking for a handout.

so you playing that modern warfare now? lol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unscrupulous sports agents? What about unscrupulous players?

by bianchi

HOOVER, Ala. – Here we go again.

The requisite defiance.

The obligatory indignation.

The necessary deniability.

The first day of Southeastern Conference Media Days predictably turned into a forum for coaches such as Florida's Urban Meyer and Alabama's Nick Saban to stand up and rail against these evil, unscrupulous sports agents preying upon their poor, naïve players.

Gag.

Meyer referred to the agents as "predators" and "piranhas preying on our kids."

"It's ridiculous and it's entrapment of young people," Saban said. "… Agents that do this, I hate to say this, but how are they any better than a pimp? I have no respect for people who do that to young people, none. I mean, none. How would you feel if they did it to your child?"

Question for Saban: If the agents are pimps, doesn't that make prostitutes out of the players who knowingly take the illicit cash and gifts? And, by the way, Nick, isn't there something a little hypocritical about a $4 million-a-year college football coach essentially referring to agents as blood-sucking parasites?

As you probably know by now, both Florida and Alabama, the big dogs of the SEC, are not only fighting for league supremacy; they are battling over who is has a more embarrassing agent controversy.

The Gators are investigating allegations that former star offensive lineman Maurkice Pouncey received $100,000 from a sports agent before last season ended. Pouncey has vehemently denied the allegations as did his twin brother Mike here Wednesday. Meanwhile, Alabama is investigating whether one of its current stars — junior defensive end Marcell Dareus — attended an agent-related party in South Florida over the summer.

And, as has become customary, everybody is being held accountable for the agent problem in college football except the most guilty people of all – the players themselves.

Can we stop painting these players as the innocent victims when really they are the culpable villains?

Let's make this clear: We don't know whether Pouncey is guilty of taking $100,000 from a sports agents as has been alleged, but if he did, don't give me this garbage about how he was victim of entrapment. Good grief, the guy is a 21-year-old junior in college. He knows how the game works. He has been lectured ad nauseum about the evils of taking money from a sports agent. He knows it is wrong to take $100,000 in cash.

These players know exactly what they're doing when they have their hands out taking money from any agent who will give it to them. And why shouldn't they when there are no ramifications for their actions.

Alabama's Dareus is a perfect case study. I can almost guarantee this is how his "punishment" will go down because this is how it always goes down: He will be ruled ineligible at some point in the next few days, but Alabama will then immediately apply to the NCAA have his eligibility restored. Translation: Dareus may be suspended for a game or two, but you better believe he'll be on the field when the Tide reaches the meat of their schedule.

Saban can talk all he wants about how players need to be held responsible, but what player isn't going to take free money when all he's risking is a two-game suspension? I've been writing this for more than a decade: If you want to stop players from taking handouts from agents then expel them from the team and ban them from NCAA competition permanently. Put their NFL futures in jeopardy – and you will quickly get their attention.

These players are intentionally breaking the rules. They know they are jeopardizing their school's stature, image and future. Yet, still, they suffer no meaningful repercussions.

Look at what Reggie Bush cost Southern Cal. He destroyed the school's reputation. He caused coaches and administrators to get fired. He got massive NCAA penalties levied against the school.

Everybody got punished for Reggie Bush's actions except Reggie Bush. He jetted off and made millions in the NFL while the USC program and the players left in it now have to deal with the monumental fallout.

It's time for coaches, administrators and, yes, law enforcement officials to start getting tough on players. Ask yourself this: Why is there is a state law in Florida making it illegal for agents to pay college players, but it's not illegal for college players to accept money from agents?

The bottom line is this:

If you're going to prosecute the pimp, you better prosecute the prostitute.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great article Sac. I have been shocked how easily the media has eaten up the portrayal of players as innocent lambs by UF and Bama. Glad to see there are some voices that are seeing through this crap. I don't understand how any player that has taken $100K can be termed "innocent".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's not one dayum thing wrong with calling them pimps, IMO. They (Saban & Meyer) obviously wouldn't call ethical agents pimps, it's just the guys that work outside the rules with ZERO regard for the possible destruction of a college career, that these two coaches were calling out. ANd far too many people here are just itching to jump on anything Nick, and Urban say and spin it as a negative, IMO. Maybe a better term would have been leeches, or parasites but even those words aren't nearly as accurate as "pimps". There's so many people on this site that just look for something bad to say about the coach of other teams.

IMO, Saban, Meyer, Spurrier, and Richt are all correct in what they had to say about this situation. We all know waht Saban and Meyer said, but SPurrier basically said that the responsibility falls on the players, and that the coaches, the instituations, and even the NCAA cannot do enough to prevent this from happening. Richt, is likely also correct in sayng that this has always happened and that it's nothing new. But the fact that players today have so many other means of being "reached" by agents, and runners is certainly a new development and as technology changes, the means of combating this situation will need to change some too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...