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WalMart Cake Goof


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I received this via email and thought it worth sharing:

This actually happened. Someone ordered a cake for a friend who was moving.

walmartcake.jpg

Okay so this is how I imagine this conversation went:

Walmart Employee: "Hello 'dis be Walmarts, how can I help you?"

Customer: "I would like to order a cake for a going away party this week."

Walmart Employee: "What you want on da cake?"

Customer: " 'Best Wishes Suzanne' and underneath that 'We will miss you'."

Some things can't be fixed!

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Don't get me wrong, if you've heard people say "under neat" as part of their dialect or manner of speaking, that is what you heard. I personally deal with people from all stations of life every working day and I don't equate "under neat" with Ebonics. But, I'm not from the ATL, either.

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Don't get me wrong, if you've heard people say "under neat" as part of their dialect or manner of speaking, that is what you heard. I personally deal with people from all stations of life every working day and I don't equate "under neat" with Ebonics. But, I'm not from the ATL, either.

I'm with you, definitely don't get what the need was to make the employee out like that, but each to their own I guess :mellow:

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oh, i guess living in atlanta makes you an professor of african american vernacular. :rolleyes:

When you grow up around it, have friends that speak it, and people talk to you every day like that for 20ish years; I would say it does. I think the proof comes when people start asking me to "translate" for them. :lol:

By the way, it is, "a professor"; not "an professor." :)

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When you grow up around it, have friends that speak it, and people talk to you every day like that for 20ish years; I would say it does. I think the proof comes when people start asking me to "translate" for them. :lol:

By the way, it is, "a professor"; not "an professor." :)

id like to see the degree first.

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When you grow up around it, have friends that speak it, and people talk to you every day like that for 20ish years; I would say it does. I think the proof comes when people start asking me to "translate" for them. :lol:

By the way, it is, "a professor"; not "an professor." :)

I was the same way when I worked at the power plant. Had an old black guy that no one could understand but I did because I sat with him at lunch every day and talked to him. He HATED the ####ing Cowboys as much as anyone has ever hated anything, so naturally me and him were buddies. Talking with him really became like learning a second language. He spoke regular English but he just spoke so fast and had a deep, gravelly voice most people couldn't hear where one word started and the other ended. It took me about a year but after that I got it perfect. People would call me over and ask me what he was saying. I thought the world of that dude, and bless him, he died last year from ####ing cancer.

His name was John Henry Jones which made him even cooler. R I P JJ

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