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Stadium Info-Nice Breakdown


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I don't recall seeing this type of breakdown anywhere. It discusses anything from the Falcons attendance making up roughly 50% of the total GWCC events, McKay saying the deal is probably 7 years away, to off topic Jag's and Patriots coming to Flowery Branch in August. The connections are obvious there and would be cool if it were open to the public. I don't know if the Canadian Press borrowed this article but it's pretty informative especially in the offseason.

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Falcons want new stadium, but versatile Georgia Dome won't be torn down

By Charles Odum (CP) 1 hour ago

ATLANTA Atlanta Falcons president Rich McKay said Friday the team wants a new stadium within seven years, but it doesn't appear the Georgia Dome is going away.

Frank Poe, the executive director of the Georgia World Congress Center which manages the Georgia Dome, told The Associated Press on Friday that the facility may be renovated but it won't be torn down. He said the dome simply is too valuable as a revenue-producer.

Poe said a new open-air stadium for the Falcons would complement, not replace, the Georgia Dome, which opened in 1992.

"If there is a second stadium we still have to keep the Georgia Dome in operation," Poe said.

He said the Georgia Dome must be kept to draw such events as the Chick-fil-A Bowl, Southeastern Conference football championship game and SEC basketball tournaments in 2011 and 2014. The Georgia Dome has been home to two Super Bowls and will host its third Final Four in 2013.

The Georgia Dome also hosts an annual matchup of SEC and Atlantic Coast Conference teams on the first week of the college football season. Beginning this year it will serve as the home for Georgia State in its inaugural football season.

"We can't lose our positioning for those types of events beyond the Falcons, which have value as well," Poe said. "The football championships, the bowl games, the other entertainment still serve our mission as an economic driver and bringing in visitors to the city."

Added Poe: "We have a solid group of clients ... who have been in an enclosed environment and have not expressed interest in an open-air stadium."

Only 10 of the 106 Georgia Dome events in 2009 were Falcons games, including eight regular-season games, according to the GWCC.

In terms of total attendance at the Georgia Dome, the Falcons drew 524,500 of more than 1,335,000 for all events in 2009, according to GWCC statistics.

The SEC has a contract to stage its football championship game in the facility through 2015.

McKay said the Falcons would support playing in a second facility while the Georgia Dome continues to host other events.

"There's been a suggestion made of an outdoor stadium and it certainly interests us but it also interests us from the potential of the dome remaining active and open in housing events," he said.

McKay said a new open-air stadium could increase revenue by "attracting new events and growing the pie as opposed to shrinking the pie."

The Georgia legislature recently passed a bill extending the hotel-motel tax for the Georgia Dome until 2045. The bill is awaiting the signature of Gov. Sonny Perdue.

"The governor's final signature is a key which helps unlock the door toward really seriously considering major renovations," Poe said.

McKay said it may be too expensive to put a retractable roof on a new stadium or the Georgia Dome.

Poe called a retractable roof on the dome "a consideration" that "probably has some challenges that would have to be overcome architecturally."

McKay said Falcons owner Arthur Blank prefers to have a new stadium near the Georgia Dome or at least near downtown. McKay said it would be difficult to find room for a new stadium near the dome.

"Those limits are just created by the availability of land, but I think Arthur is definitely focused on doing a deal downtown, and in doing it we know we've got to work within some limits that are going to put some constraints on a project. That includes parking and the size of the stadium."

McKay said other sites away from downtown are still being considered.

McKay acknowledged he expects opposition to using tax dollars with private funds.

"Everybody is extremely sensitive to the current economic environment, but this is a project we've been working on for a couple of years and we will work on for more years," McKay said. "It's not as though this is a stadium that will be built in the next three or four years. This is something we're talking about in the next six or seven years."

NOTES: The Falcons will hold combined practices with the Jacksonville Jaguars and New England Patriots during training camp. Jacksonville will be at the Falcons' suburban complex for practices on Aug. 9-10. After Atlanta's preseason opener, the Patriots travel to Flowery Branch for practice on Aug. 17, two days before meet in an exhibition game at the Georgia Dome. Falcons coach Mike Smith is Jacksonville's former defensive co-ordinator, and general manager Thomas Dimitroff is New England's former director of college scouting.

Copyright © 2010 The Canadian Press. All rights reserved

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I am not a proponent of our team getting a new stadium when the Dome serves our needs just fine. I would not look forward to late December games when it is raining and the wind is cutting through you like in Fulton County Stadium nor am I am not a fan of higher season ticket prices and PSL requirements that would surely accompany a new stadium.

Thanks for the thread and article phatty. I hope some of the scrimmages are open to the public.

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..........HOW MANY TIMES HAVE I SAID THIS??????!!!!!!

nobody's tearing down the Georgia Dome. The Chic-fil-A bowl, SEC championship, Final Four aint going NOWHERE.

an outdoor stadium will be built, but it will be the BEST in the business. I'd bet my bottom dollar on that. Blank is not going to get enough funding to build a nice retractable roof stadium.

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..........HOW MANY TIMES HAVE I SAID THIS??????!!!!!!

nobody's tearing down the Georgia Dome. The Chic-fil-A bowl, SEC championship, Final Four aint going NOWHERE.

an outdoor stadium will be built, but it will be the BEST in the business. I'd bet my bottom dollar on that. Blank is not going to get enough funding to build a nice retractable roof stadium.

I am betting that if it entails much tax payer funding the GA Dome will still be the home of the Falcons as well. Not much sympathy will be generated by the general public for a team with a perfectly good stadium already erected for them to use.

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I know very little about Major League Soccer which I know Blank had a bid on a team a few years back so I checked them out a little bit. He also mentioned trying again in 2013 or so. As I recall from earlier the season runs from March to October. I looked at average attendance in the stadiums and looked at average tickets prices and very roughly the attendance would bring 6 to 10M to a new open air stadium. That's less than half than the hotel tax but what the article doesn't state is how those tax funds are distributed and how they are used.

Blank mentioned that by not owning the stadium they are cut out of a lot of the revenues and can't compete with the current NFL model. That is why the Falcons organization ends up on the bottom of the barrel of Forbes every year.

I debated the open vs closed stadium in the various other threads like everyone else so that wasn't the point in posting this. This sounds like a pizzing contest between the GWCC and the Falcons and worst of all it will go on for as McKay said 6 or 7 years. It could be interesting that the SEC contract runs out in 2015.

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I am not a proponent of our team getting a new stadium when the Dome serves our needs just fine. I would not look forward to late December games when it is raining and the wind is cutting through you like in Fulton County Stadium nor am I am not a fan of higher season ticket prices and PSL requirements that would surely accompany a new stadium.

Thanks for the thread and article phatty. I hope some of the scrimmages are open to the public.

The team is seriously de-valued because it LEASES the stadium. They need their own.

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The team is seriously de-valued because it LEASES the stadium. They need their own.

Letting the pseudo government run the daily operations and decide how best to spend money is a contradiction. The governments job is to account for every cent to provide for it's citizens. A private industries job is to maximize the bottome line. The GWCC is tied to the city of Atlanta and what brings revenue dollars to the area to justify their crazy mismanaged and inefficient advententures gone awry. Since Blank took over the Falcons are laser beam focused on sustaining a profitable company, that gives back to the community, and provides a civic pride towards the city which also does the job of the city of Atlanta which gets tied up in politics and forgets about boosting the Chamber of Commerce.

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I know very little about Major League Soccer which I know Blank had a bid on a team a few years back so I checked them out a little bit. He also mentioned trying again in 2013 or so. As I recall from earlier the season runs from March to October. I looked at average attendance in the stadiums and looked at average tickets prices and very roughly the attendance would bring 6 to 10M to a new open air stadium. That's less than half than the hotel tax but what the article doesn't state is how those tax funds are distributed and how they are used.

Blank mentioned that by not owning the stadium they are cut out of a lot of the revenues and can't compete with the current NFL model. That is why the Falcons organization ends up on the bottom of the barrel of Forbes every year.

I debated the open vs closed stadium in the various other threads like everyone else so that wasn't the point in posting this. This sounds like a pizzing contest between the GWCC and the Falcons and worst of all it will go on for as McKay said 6 or 7 years. It could be interesting that the SEC contract runs out in 2015.

Good read Phatty---if you look at what the GWCC has said to date and what the Falcons have made very public---it is very clear that they need each other. The City wants the Falcon revenue and rent so bad the politicians and city leaders will bend over to keep us downtown. The truth is that downtown has been dying for a decade. All the new construction (when they were building) and beefy rent rates are north of the perimeter.

Mr. Blank does not want to pull a Jerry Jones and spend 1-billion dollars. He didn't get to be the king by taking such crazy risk, therefore a deal on the existing Ga. Dome will get done that includes a retractable roof and a better tailgate and pregame fan experience.

All the media stuff you see right now is hot and posturing for dollars. We will stay in the Dome but a new roof will be put on it.

Edited by Nono
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I am betting that if it entails much tax payer funding the GA Dome will still be the home of the Falcons as well. Not much sympathy will be generated by the general public for a team with a perfectly good stadium already erected for them to use.

If there is ANY talk of using tax money on this project, it will not be built. When we have already laid off firemen and policemen due to tax shortfalls (and left some neighborhoods dangerously close to being unprotected in case of a fire) you won't be able to make the case we should use tax money to build a stadium instead of rehiring fire and police.

I paid my property taxes last fall (had budgeted for it and thought I was all done). The county I live in didn't collect as much in tax revenue as they hoped, so the county RETROACTIVELY raised property taxes and sent me ANOTHER tax bill for a higher amount blowing my budget out of the water. My budget is blown and my child and family are doing without so we can pay for this additional unexpected tax. Now someone comes along and suggests we use tax money to pay for a...football stadium?

Tax revenues at every level (national, state, county, city) are down. Vital government services are being eliminated, reduced, or stretched to the breaking point at every government level. If a new tax is devised it should be used to restore vital services. Right now the priority for spending tax money should be (1) police, (2) fire, (3) teachers/education, and (17,482) build a new stadium.

I know taxes like a hotel or rental car tax are paid by "outsiders", but that doesn't mean that money should be spent in just any way. You can pay policemen with money raised by a hotel tax just as easily as you can pay for a stadium.

In this economic/tax climate the idea of using tax money to build a stadium to replace the Dome (or worse, sit along side the Dome, which would put the government on the hook for two sets of stadium maintenance costs) is not just ill advised, it is reckless.

This is the kind of move that will lose politicians their jobs.

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There's some misconceptions here in the responses. First, they've already looked at renovating the dome and have already decided it is better to build a new stadium from a financial standpoint. Second, using public funds to help pay for the dome is not a waste of taxpayer dollars. It is an investment in our city and will create jobs, not only in the short term to build the thing, but long term jobs as well. This team brings money to the city of Atlanta and provides lots of jobs (directly and indirectly). Atlanta won't pay for the whole thing, but providing the land and a small percentage of the building costs would be a smart investment. Otherwise the stadium could wind up in the suburbs and the city will lose out.

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There's some misconceptions here in the responses. First, they've already looked at renovating the dome and have already decided it is better to build a new stadium from a financial standpoint. Second, using public funds to help pay for the dome is not a waste of taxpayer dollars. It is an investment in our city and will create jobs, not only in the short term to build the thing, but long term jobs as well. This team brings money to the city of Atlanta and provides lots of jobs (directly and indirectly). Atlanta won't pay for the whole thing, but providing the land and a small percentage of the building costs would be a smart investment. Otherwise the stadium could wind up in the suburbs and the city will lose out.

When you are short of money, replacing a stadium that works fine with a new one is not a smart economic move.

Creates jobs? No, shifts jobs. The "stadium jobs" (vending, etc...) already exist with the Dome. Those jobs will just be shifted from the Dome to the new facility.

New construction jobs? The money spent constructing a new stadium could also be spent on other projects (more teachers, policemen, firemen for example). Choosing to spend money to build a stadium means you spend money to create construction jobs, but don't on teachers. Again, just job shifting, not job creation.

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When you are short of money, replacing a stadium that works fine with a new one is not a smart economic move.

Creates jobs? No, shifts jobs. The "stadium jobs" (vending, etc...) already exist with the Dome. Those jobs will just be shifted from the Dome to the new facility.

New construction jobs? The money spent constructing a new stadium could also be spent on other projects (more teachers, policemen, firemen for example). Choosing to spend money to build a stadium means you spend money to create construction jobs, but don't on teachers. Again, just job shifting, not job creation.

The team being in Atlanta creates jobs- across the service and hotel industries as well as actual Falcons/stadium realted jobs. As well as bringing in tax revenues and making the city more attractive to fortune 500 companies.

The team does not have to stay here, they can move wherever they want. It is up to the city to provide the team enough incentive to keep their business and jobs here. So if the city doesn't want to help out, then the city can allow the jobs to "shift" somewhere else. Not a smart move, and not what the city will choose.

The stadium doesn't "work fine" for the team. That is the issue. If investing in a new stadium brings more money to the city, and keeps the team here for the next 30 years, then it is a smart investment. It will keep jobs, business, and tax revenues here- and that will provide more money to spend on teachers and firemen.

I'm born and raised here. I live here. I want us to pay our teachers and public servants. I also think losing the team, even if its just moving them OTP, will cost the city more than what it would take to keep them here.

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