Jump to content

Santini: Saints GM tried to cover up drug theft


Dirtybirdn@tion
 Share

Recommended Posts

You got so many breaks last year with your piss poor schedule and that god awful gift of a NFC championship

game.

I hope this thing comes down your eyeliner wearing, pill popping pompus, drag queen of a coach.

But this this could trickle down to some players as well. :P

In his first lengthy interview since filing a federal lawsuit against the team, former Saints security director Geoffrey Santini told USA Today that he only decided to resign and later sue the team after general manager Mickey Loomis tried to convince him to help cover up the theft of Vicodin from the team's headquarters.

"I was witnessing crimes, and I wasn't going to stand for that," Santini told the newspaper. "I did everything I could to save the people that were involved, but it just didn't go that way. Mickey didn't let it."

Loomis did not return a call to USA Today and hasn't responded publicly about Santini's lawsuit.

I was witnessing crimes, and I wasn't going to stand for that. I did everything I could to save the people that were involved, but it just didn't go that way. Mickey [Loomis] didn't let it.

-- Geoffrey Santini, to USA Today

The lawsuit, filed April 30, alleges one "senior staff member" was caught on video stealing the prescription pain killer Vicodin, while another was allowed to take a seemingly excessive amount of Vicodin from team supplies.

Santini told USA Today the "senior staff member" caught on video stealing Vicodin was Saints assistant head coach Joe Vitt and the other staff member mentioned in the lawsuit is Saints head coach Sean Payton.

Santini's lawsuit does not implicate Payton in anything illegal. Santini resigned from his post with the Saints effective Aug. 29.

Santini said being ordered to either undertake or ignore activity he thought may be criminal was what led him to resign, and he is seeking damages and back pay.

The lawsuit contends Loomis asked Santini to find out who was stealing Vicodin, then tried to keep the matter quiet after Santini, a retired FBI agent, brought back the results of his investigation.

Saints spokesman Greg Bensel has denied the allegations against the club, portraying Santini as a disgruntled former employee trying to orchestrate a shakedown. Bensel has said the team will aggressively defend itself in court.

According to USA Today, the lawsuit alleges that team head trainer Scottie Patton said that Vitt had a medical condition requiring the use of Vicodin. Payton did not have a medical condition where the drug was prescribed, USA Today reported Patton saying, citing the lawsuit.

Santini told USA Today that he asked Loomis to come clean about the situation before they met with team owner Tom Benson. Benson had said that NFL security told him "that they didn't feel they were getting all the facts," Santini told USA Today.

"I begged Mickey Loomis. I said 'Now's the opportunity to tell him everything. We can get this out on the table so at least the owner is fully aware. He owns the team. He's the boss. And if we get him fully knowledgeable, then we're safe.' But Mickey didn't want to do that," Santini told the newspaper.

The lawsuit states that Loomis told Saints Benson that both Vitt and Payton were taking Vicodin for medical conditions, even though Patton had said that Payton didn't have a condition requiring the use of the prescription drug, USA Today reported.

"He was protecting Payton," Santini told USA Today. "That day pretty much ended it for me."

On Saturday, Payton stopped short of responding directly to the allegations in the lawsuit, saying now was not the right time to tell his side because civil litigation is pending.

"Certainly, we understand the questions surrounding it, but I'm really not at liberty to" answer them, Payton said. "As time goes forward, well know more and more. ... There just needs to be the correct steps. When you have a civil suit, those probably become more complicated. ... That's the thing that's challenging."

If proven, the theft of controlled substances and an attempted cover-up could represent violations of state and federal laws. Failing to report the alleged thefts could be a violation of federal law.

Santini gave evidence he collected to federal authorities before he resigned from the Saints last August and also kept his own copies of video and audio recordings that his lawyer, Donald Hyatt II, said backs up his civil case.

USA Today, citing the lawsuit, reported that Santini recorded conversations with Loomis, Patton and assistant trainer Kevin Mangum.

The Drug Enforcement Administration has told The Associated Press that it is aware of the allegations and that an investigation is pending. Jefferson Parish authorities, who would have jurisdiction over state crimes in Metairie, said they were not aware of the allegations until the lawsuit was filed April 30 and that they are not investigating at this time.

NFL spokesman Greg Aiello has said the league is aware of Santini's lawsuit and is following developments, but has no further comment.

Edited by Dirtybirdn@tion
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You got so many breaks last year with your piss poor schedule and that god awful gift of a NFC championship

game.

I hope this thing comes down your eyeliner wearing, pill popping pompus, drag queen of a coach.

But this this could trickle down to some players as well. :P

In his first lengthy interview since filing a federal lawsuit against the team, former Saints security director Geoffrey Santini told USA Today that he only decided to resign and later sue the team after general manager Mickey Loomis tried to convince him to help cover up the theft of Vicodin from the team's headquarters.

"I was witnessing crimes, and I wasn't going to stand for that," Santini told the newspaper. "I did everything I could to save the people that were involved, but it just didn't go that way. Mickey didn't let it."

Loomis did not return a call to USA Today and hasn't responded publicly about Santini's lawsuit.

I was witnessing crimes, and I wasn't going to stand for that. I did everything I could to save the people that were involved, but it just didn't go that way. Mickey [Loomis] didn't let it.

-- Geoffrey Santini, to USA Today

The lawsuit, filed April 30, alleges one "senior staff member" was caught on video stealing the prescription pain killer Vicodin, while another was allowed to take a seemingly excessive amount of Vicodin from team supplies.

Santini told USA Today the "senior staff member" caught on video stealing Vicodin was Saints assistant head coach Joe Vitt and the other staff member mentioned in the lawsuit is Saints head coach Sean Payton.

Santini's lawsuit does not implicate Payton in anything illegal. Santini resigned from his post with the Saints effective Aug. 29.

Santini said being ordered to either undertake or ignore activity he thought may be criminal was what led him to resign, and he is seeking damages and back pay.

The lawsuit contends Loomis asked Santini to find out who was stealing Vicodin, then tried to keep the matter quiet after Santini, a retired FBI agent, brought back the results of his investigation.

Saints spokesman Greg Bensel has denied the allegations against the club, portraying Santini as a disgruntled former employee trying to orchestrate a shakedown. Bensel has said the team will aggressively defend itself in court.

According to USA Today, the lawsuit alleges that team head trainer Scottie Patton said that Vitt had a medical condition requiring the use of Vicodin. Payton did not have a medical condition where the drug was prescribed, USA Today reported Patton saying, citing the lawsuit.

Santini told USA Today that he asked Loomis to come clean about the situation before they met with team owner Tom Benson. Benson had said that NFL security told him "that they didn't feel they were getting all the facts," Santini told USA Today.

"I begged Mickey Loomis. I said 'Now's the opportunity to tell him everything. We can get this out on the table so at least the owner is fully aware. He owns the team. He's the boss. And if we get him fully knowledgeable, then we're safe.' But Mickey didn't want to do that," Santini told the newspaper.

The lawsuit states that Loomis told Saints Benson that both Vitt and Payton were taking Vicodin for medical conditions, even though Patton had said that Payton didn't have a condition requiring the use of the prescription drug, USA Today reported.

"He was protecting Payton," Santini told USA Today. "That day pretty much ended it for me."

On Saturday, Payton stopped short of responding directly to the allegations in the lawsuit, saying now was not the right time to tell his side because civil litigation is pending.

"Certainly, we understand the questions surrounding it, but I'm really not at liberty to" answer them, Payton said. "As time goes forward, well know more and more. ... There just needs to be the correct steps. When you have a civil suit, those probably become more complicated. ... That's the thing that's challenging."

If proven, the theft of controlled substances and an attempted cover-up could represent violations of state and federal laws. Failing to report the alleged thefts could be a violation of federal law.

Santini gave evidence he collected to federal authorities before he resigned from the Saints last August and also kept his own copies of video and audio recordings that his lawyer, Donald Hyatt II, said backs up his civil case.

USA Today, citing the lawsuit, reported that Santini recorded conversations with Loomis, Patton and assistant trainer Kevin Mangum.

The Drug Enforcement Administration has told The Associated Press that it is aware of the allegations and that an investigation is pending. Jefferson Parish authorities, who would have jurisdiction over state crimes in Metairie, said they were not aware of the allegations until the lawsuit was filed April 30 and that they are not investigating at this time.

NFL spokesman Greg Aiello has said the league is aware of Santini's lawsuit and is following developments, but has no further comment.

The guy even states Payton didn't do anything illegal...

Our schedule is determined years in advance, although easy we won the SB with it. In 2008 the Falcons had just as easy of a schedule as we did this year, but didn't do anything worth mentioning, except losing their playoff game.

If something does go down, I hope everyone involved is reprehended to the harshest degree, but I don't think the Saints are to worried, because when he tried to extort money from the organization about this they laughed and he resigned.

The article fails to mention that does it?

How does an athletic trainer know that Payton's condition doesn't warrant prescription pills?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You got so many breaks last year with your piss poor schedule and that god awful gift of a NFC championship

game.

I hope this thing comes down your eyeliner wearing, pill popping pompus, drag queen of a coach.

. :P

Are you actually over 12 years old, or are you always this big of a moron?

Here's my response to your thread:

>

>>

>>>

>>>>

>>>>>

How's that?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This guy and his lawyer keep going to the press every couple of days to state the same thing over and over.

Does he have anything else other than the original video of Vitt breaking into the cabinet or his wire-taps of the two Saints trainers??

I don't think he does. Its increasingly apparent that the only option left for him is to try to pressure the organization into a settlement as he watches his career as a security supervisor in corporate america come to a sad ending.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is what's going to happen..../

Actually, this situation has three elements to it.

1. Possible Criminal Charges, that could involve jail time;

2. Civil lawsuit, which is what Santini filed for monetary damages; and

3. Possibly disciplanary action from the NFL that could involve fines and/or suspension.

The good news is that there have not been charges filed, even though it appears the evidence was handed over to the DA a year ago. Obviously, this is the most serious; the other two could just cost you money, not your freedom.

Concerning the civil, Louisiana is an at-will state, meaning, they that he could be fired for just about any reason. Santini is claiming he was constructively discharged. Under LA law,

In order to prevail on her constructive discharge claim, employee must prove that the working conditions were so intolerable that a reasonable person would have felt compelled to resign.

Francois v. Acadiana Sec. Plus, Inc. 976 So.2d 809, 2007-1112 (La.App. 3 Cir.,2008)

Based upon what I have heard so far, I believe the Saints will file a motion for summary judgment asking the Judge to dismiss the case because as a matter of law, Santini can show that his quitting rises to the level of a constructive discharge, and regardless, he was an at-will employee who could have been fired for just about any reason anyway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You got so many breaks last year with your piss poor schedule and that god awful gift of a NFC championship

game.

I hope this thing comes down your eyeliner wearing, pill popping pompus, drag queen of a coach.

But this this could trickle down to some players as well. :P

LOL piss poor schedule. How was the schedule exactly piss poor?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i have heard Payton mentioned over and over again, you guys are in trouble man, literally ....

click your heels together and say theres no place like home

maybe it will help B)

http://network.yardbarker.com/nfl/article_external/Suit_Zero_Evidence_Linking_Payton_To_Drug_Abuse/2533972

read..

In the suit Santini cites an unnamed senior staff member, first reported by Mike Florio of Pro Football Talk as head coach Sean Payton, being “distributed” prescription painkillers improperly from Saints head trainer Scottie Patton. (Page 2, Item 7)

Though he did not confirm that he was one of the individuals named in Santini’s lawsuit, in a statement today Payton denied ever improperly using prescription drugs.

I have reviewed Geoff Santini’s lawsuit and the unwarranted publicity it has received. I have never abused or stolen vicodin or any other medication.

In reading the 13-page Santini lawsuit filing, I also found no evidence cited by Santini suggesting Payton did anything wrong.

Though Payton is getting most of the media attention, the focus of Santini’s suit actually barely involves the Saints head coach. Instead, the thrust of the civil claim stems from videotape evidence that another senior Saints staff member, reportedly linebackers coach Joe Vitt, stole a total of 20 Vicodin pills from a team medical cabinet on April 29-30, 2009.

Santini then cites a subsequent, alleged coverup attempt by Saints officials on why those pills, and 110 others, went missing as the reason for his constructive discharge.

On June 23, 2009, Santini reported the evidence of the misappropriation of prescription meds by the Saints, with approval from team General Manager Mickey Loomis, to the U.S. Attorney’s Eastern District of Louisiana office. 11 months later, with no criminal charges brought against any member of the Saints organization, Santini filed a civil suit against the club last Friday.

Though Florio at Pro Football Talk reports that before Santini sued the team, he offered to drop all claims against the club for a seven-figure payout.

Multiple sources tell us that, before filing suit, Santini requested payment in the amount of $2 million in exchange for a full and complete settlement of his claims. … As we understand it, the Saints did not respond to the opening demand.

Per our sources, Santini’s counsel, Donald Hyatt, eventually offered to make a bottom-line, non-negotiable demand. The number was significantly lower than $2 million, and possibly less than $1 million.

In response, no offer came from the Saints.

That said, we’ve picked up indications that the Saints were trying on Friday to put together a package in the low six figures.

From the amount of material evidence supporting Santini’s claim of prescription drug abuse and a subsequent effort within the organization to cover it up, it isn’t hard to figure out why the Saints aren’t settling - and the Feds haven’t brought charges against any member of the club.

The heart of Santini’s claim in the lawsuit filing is videotape of Vitt allegedly stealing 20 Vicodin pills and taped conversations Santini had with Saints head trainer Patton and assistant trainer Kevin Mangum.

With Santini wearing a wire during his conversations with Patton and Mangum, it appears from the transcripts of those discussions that the former Saints security chief tried to get the trainers to directly implicate Saints GM Loomis in a coverup of Vitt’s alleged Vicodin theft - along with another 110 missing Vicodin pills.

But from those taped conversations, there’s no smoking gun statement from Patton or Mangum that Loomis expressly directed them to misrepresent the dispensation of Vicodin as it pertained to Vitt or any member of the organization.

Yes, there’s some hinting from the trainers that indicates that might’ve happened, but that sentiment from Patton and Mangum may have resulted from a repeated, leading line of questioning from the wire-wearing Santini.

With no criminal charges pending, the only thing that ultimately matters now in this civil case is if Santini can prove that Loomis actively attempted to involve him and team trainers Patton and Mangum in the coverup of an illegal misappropriation of Vicodin to staff members.

Gwen Filosa of the NEW ORLEANS TIMES-PICAYUNE reported on April 30:

Santini, who said he recorded conversations about the missing Vicodin with his supervisors and other staff members, said he was instructed to create false records to conceal both federal and state criminal violations.

We know that Santini did indeed record conversations with Patton and Mangum, but there’s no indication in the lawsuit filing that Santini’s conversations with Loomis were recorded. And it’s transcript-less conversations with Loomis in the lawsuit filing that Santini cites as the main reason for his constructive discharge.

Santini transcribed the taped conversations with the two trainers word-for-word in his lawsuit filing, but there’s no such transcript from his numerous conversations with Loomis. Conversations that are critical to his claim against the club.

As for Payton, he’s barely mentioned in the lawsuit, which includes no material evidence suggesting that the coach did anything inappropriate. The passage below - direct from the filing - is the sole basis for Santini including Payton in the lawsuit:

Sean Payton Mention In Geoff Santini Lawsuit Filing

If Payton did receive pills, head trainer Patton told Santini he was “distributed” them despite Payton not having a “painful condition.” But if Payton was indeed “distributed” the pills by Patton, how did the coach acquire the medication improperly?

If Patton thought that Payton did not feel any pain, why did he distribute the coach the pills in the first place? With Vicodin being used as a fairly common, general pain relief medication, how did athletic trainer Patton know the level of pain Payton was experiencing?

The filing answers none of those questions.

The entire basis for Payton being included in Santini’s lawsuit is an athletic trainer giving his medical diagnosis on the pain threshold of the coach. Yet it was the same trainer who (allegedly) reported his own improper “distribution” of pills to Payton!

If anyone is at fault in that alleged drug transaction, it’s trainer Patton and the attending physician Dr. Amoss. Perhaps not coincidentally, there’s no subsequent mention in the filing of Payton ever being examined by Amoss - even after Patton claimed Payton was improperly distributed Vicodin.

So with all that in mind, why on earth did Santini include Payton in the filing?

Is it unreasonable to think that Santini thought he could get a larger “settlement” payout if Payton was somehow involved in his scandalous-sounding lawsuit?

I’m not dismissing the fact that some impropriety may have gone on in regards to the dispensation and/or acquisition of prescription medication by the Saints. If Vitt is seen on videotape stealing 20 Vicodin pills, that certainly is cause for concern.

But Santini said himself in the lawsuit that that evidence was turned over to the Feds last June. 11 months later, the Feds have yet to charge anyone in the Saints organization with criminal activity.

Beyond those slivers of material evidence, Santini’s claims against the club, especially when it comes to gratuitously including Payton in the lawsuit and then subsequently demanding $2 million from the club, can’t help but look dubious.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://network.yardbarker.com/nfl/article_external/Suit_Zero_Evidence_Linking_Payton_To_Drug_Abuse/2533972

read..

In the suit Santini cites an unnamed senior staff member, first reported by Mike Florio of Pro Football Talk as head coach Sean Payton, being “distributed” prescription painkillers improperly from Saints head trainer Scottie Patton. (Page 2, Item 7)

Though he did not confirm that he was one of the individuals named in Santini’s lawsuit, in a statement today Payton denied ever improperly using prescription drugs.

I have reviewed Geoff Santini’s lawsuit and the unwarranted publicity it has received. I have never abused or stolen vicodin or any other medication.

In reading the 13-page Santini lawsuit filing, I also found no evidence cited by Santini suggesting Payton did anything wrong.

Though Payton is getting most of the media attention, the focus of Santini’s suit actually barely involves the Saints head coach. Instead, the thrust of the civil claim stems from videotape evidence that another senior Saints staff member, reportedly linebackers coach Joe Vitt, stole a total of 20 Vicodin pills from a team medical cabinet on April 29-30, 2009.

Santini then cites a subsequent, alleged coverup attempt by Saints officials on why those pills, and 110 others, went missing as the reason for his constructive discharge.

On June 23, 2009, Santini reported the evidence of the misappropriation of prescription meds by the Saints, with approval from team General Manager Mickey Loomis, to the U.S. Attorney’s Eastern District of Louisiana office. 11 months later, with no criminal charges brought against any member of the Saints organization, Santini filed a civil suit against the club last Friday.

Though Florio at Pro Football Talk reports that before Santini sued the team, he offered to drop all claims against the club for a seven-figure payout.

Multiple sources tell us that, before filing suit, Santini requested payment in the amount of $2 million in exchange for a full and complete settlement of his claims. … As we understand it, the Saints did not respond to the opening demand.

Per our sources, Santini’s counsel, Donald Hyatt, eventually offered to make a bottom-line, non-negotiable demand. The number was significantly lower than $2 million, and possibly less than $1 million.

In response, no offer came from the Saints.

That said, we’ve picked up indications that the Saints were trying on Friday to put together a package in the low six figures.

From the amount of material evidence supporting Santini’s claim of prescription drug abuse and a subsequent effort within the organization to cover it up, it isn’t hard to figure out why the Saints aren’t settling - and the Feds haven’t brought charges against any member of the club.

The heart of Santini’s claim in the lawsuit filing is videotape of Vitt allegedly stealing 20 Vicodin pills and taped conversations Santini had with Saints head trainer Patton and assistant trainer Kevin Mangum.

With Santini wearing a wire during his conversations with Patton and Mangum, it appears from the transcripts of those discussions that the former Saints security chief tried to get the trainers to directly implicate Saints GM Loomis in a coverup of Vitt’s alleged Vicodin theft - along with another 110 missing Vicodin pills.

But from those taped conversations, there’s no smoking gun statement from Patton or Mangum that Loomis expressly directed them to misrepresent the dispensation of Vicodin as it pertained to Vitt or any member of the organization.

Yes, there’s some hinting from the trainers that indicates that might’ve happened, but that sentiment from Patton and Mangum may have resulted from a repeated, leading line of questioning from the wire-wearing Santini.

With no criminal charges pending, the only thing that ultimately matters now in this civil case is if Santini can prove that Loomis actively attempted to involve him and team trainers Patton and Mangum in the coverup of an illegal misappropriation of Vicodin to staff members.

Gwen Filosa of the NEW ORLEANS TIMES-PICAYUNE reported on April 30:

Santini, who said he recorded conversations about the missing Vicodin with his supervisors and other staff members, said he was instructed to create false records to conceal both federal and state criminal violations.

We know that Santini did indeed record conversations with Patton and Mangum, but there’s no indication in the lawsuit filing that Santini’s conversations with Loomis were recorded. And it’s transcript-less conversations with Loomis in the lawsuit filing that Santini cites as the main reason for his constructive discharge.

Santini transcribed the taped conversations with the two trainers word-for-word in his lawsuit filing, but there’s no such transcript from his numerous conversations with Loomis. Conversations that are critical to his claim against the club.

As for Payton, he’s barely mentioned in the lawsuit, which includes no material evidence suggesting that the coach did anything inappropriate. The passage below - direct from the filing - is the sole basis for Santini including Payton in the lawsuit:

Sean Payton Mention In Geoff Santini Lawsuit Filing

If Payton did receive pills, head trainer Patton told Santini he was “distributed” them despite Payton not having a “painful condition.” But if Payton was indeed “distributed” the pills by Patton, how did the coach acquire the medication improperly?

If Patton thought that Payton did not feel any pain, why did he distribute the coach the pills in the first place? With Vicodin being used as a fairly common, general pain relief medication, how did athletic trainer Patton know the level of pain Payton was experiencing?

The filing answers none of those questions.

The entire basis for Payton being included in Santini’s lawsuit is an athletic trainer giving his medical diagnosis on the pain threshold of the coach. Yet it was the same trainer who (allegedly) reported his own improper “distribution” of pills to Payton!

If anyone is at fault in that alleged drug transaction, it’s trainer Patton and the attending physician Dr. Amoss. Perhaps not coincidentally, there’s no subsequent mention in the filing of Payton ever being examined by Amoss - even after Patton claimed Payton was improperly distributed Vicodin.

So with all that in mind, why on earth did Santini include Payton in the filing?

Is it unreasonable to think that Santini thought he could get a larger “settlement” payout if Payton was somehow involved in his scandalous-sounding lawsuit?

I’m not dismissing the fact that some impropriety may have gone on in regards to the dispensation and/or acquisition of prescription medication by the Saints. If Vitt is seen on videotape stealing 20 Vicodin pills, that certainly is cause for concern.

But Santini said himself in the lawsuit that that evidence was turned over to the Feds last June. 11 months later, the Feds have yet to charge anyone in the Saints organization with criminal activity.

Beyond those slivers of material evidence, Santini’s claims against the club, especially when it comes to gratuitously including Payton in the lawsuit and then subsequently demanding $2 million from the club, can’t help but look dubious.

Highlighted interesting things..

Edited by bush4life
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For one i have to address the comparison between our 08 sced and yours.

you had a proven offense with an experiance QB ? was this an insinuation that the 08 falcons were as good as the 09 saints? Even im not going that far.

My opinion is regardless of it being the saints organization even if it were the falcons i say roll out a huge suspension/fine on whoever is convicted. End of story.

just to show you how unbias i am when it comes to drugs babs deserves anything he gets even if its 4-6 games if he got 10 id be a little angry because **** players get away with murder in the nfl half the time. but still if babs isnt suspended i'll be angry. I just dont like drugs/illiegal use of perscription drugs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thats to much to read, i will just go by what i just now heard on NFL Live, Basical i heard Payton and Vitt stole the pills, the gm covered it up. to protect Payton

You must be clicking YOUR heels too much to hear what they're saying. Santini never accused Payton of stealing vicodin.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You must be clicking YOUR heels too much to hear what they're saying. Santini never accused Payton of stealing vicodin.

why does his name keep coming up ?????

every day they mention him involved in this in some way....

is it a conspiracy ?????

if he is not involved why does his name keep coming up ????

tell me please...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you actually over 12 years old, or are you always this big of a moron?

Here's my response to your thread:

>

>>

>>>

>>>>

>>>>>

How's that?

Whoa Sally if you can't take any BANTER this might not be the place for you.... The fact that you've shown up out of no-where on the FMB close to or right after the fact speaks volumes...... ;)

Edited by Dirtybirdn@tion
Link to comment
Share on other sites

this is why his name keeps coming up

http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=5153943

heres the only part i saw that mattered, the very first of the article

NEW ORLEANS -- Less than three months after their thrilling victory in the Super Bowl, the New Orleans Saints have been accused by their former security director of trying to cover up the theft of prescription pain pills from the club's drug locker.

One of those involved was head coach Sean Payton, two people familiar with the case told The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because of the sensitive nature of the suit.

if it looks like a fish

acts like a fish

and smells like a fish

chances are its a fish man

Link to comment
Share on other sites

this is why his name keeps coming up

http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=5153943

heres the only part i saw that mattered, the very first of the article

NEW ORLEANS -- Less than three months after their thrilling victory in the Super Bowl, the New Orleans Saints have been accused by their former security director of trying to cover up the theft of prescription pain pills from the club's drug locker.

One of those involved was head coach Sean Payton, two people familiar with the case told The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because of the sensitive nature of the suit.

if it looks like a fish

acts like a fish

and smells like a fish

chances are its a fish man

Well I told you what to read that states Payton did no wrong I do know what else to tell ya....

Bottom line nothings going to be done except maybe a 4 game suspension like your bioy babs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Saints lawyer says team will respond to Vicodin charges in court

Wednesday, 12 May 2010

Associated Press Reporting

Quote:

An attorney for the New Orleans Saints says the team will respond in court to allegations of prescription Vicodin thefts made by the club's former security director.

Lawyer Phil Wittmann says the Saints won't settle with Geoffrey Santini, look forward to the trial, and won't be publicly discussing the lawsuit that he filed against the team.

Wittman's comments came after Santini said in an interview with Usa Today that he regrets not going straight to Saints owner Tom Benson when he found out about missing prescription drugs at team headquarters.

http://www.wwl.com/Saints-lawyer-say...din-ch/7034180

loos like it's going to court shrug.

You know if someone ends up going to jail, it's their fault, bt I am going to love that this guy wont see a dime and has to pay his court fees hah.

Edited by bush4life
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Saints lawyer says team will respond to Vicodin charges in court

Wednesday, 12 May 2010

Associated Press Reporting

Quote:

An attorney for the New Orleans Saints says the team will respond in court to allegations of prescription Vicodin thefts made by the club's former security director.

Lawyer Phil Wittmann says the Saints won't settle with Geoffrey Santini, look forward to the trial, and won't be publicly discussing the lawsuit that he filed against the team.

Wittman's comments came after Santini said in an interview with Usa Today that he regrets not going straight to Saints owner Tom Benson when he found out about missing prescription drugs at team headquarters.

http://www.wwl.com/S....din-ch/7034180

loos like it's going to court shrug.

You know if someone ends up going to jail, it's their fault, bt I am going to love that this guy wont see a dime and has to pay his court fees hah.

so will this court thing go down during the season ?????

wow that could be even bigger problems.... its a bloody mess, we had ours in 07, i feel for ya, would feel for you more if it were not Saints lol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

so will this court thing go down during the season ?????

wow that could be even bigger problems.... its a bloody mess, we had ours in 07, i feel for ya, would feel for you more if it were not Saints lol

Nah it will be when we return from Dallas in March =]

Edited by bush4life
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any bright people out there will realize that if you have any kind of case you don't leak your relevant evidence to the media before it goes to trial. Such a maneuver only makes sense if your goal is to embarrass the other party in the public forum to such a degree as to influence a settlement. The Saints are taking it to trial with confidence, which tells me that not only will they win, but the damage this guy is doing in the interim is negligible.

Santini wants money, gang. This isn't a criminal trial.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...