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Braves will retire Glavine's number August 6th


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ATLANTA -- Tom Glavine thought of his rocky first full season with the Atlanta Braves when the team announced Tuesday it will retire his number.

Glavine's highlights with the Braves included two NL Cy Young awards and the decisive win over the Cleveland Indians in the 1995 World Series.

Before he enjoyed five seasons with 20 or more wins with Atlanta, Glavine went 7-17 in 1988. He says at that point there was no way he could know his No. 47 would one day be retired by the team.

"It's not something you ever envisioned and not something I ever envisioned, certainly with the way my career started in Atlanta," Glavine told The Associated Press.

The Braves will induct Glavine into the team's Hall of Fame and retire his number on Aug. 6 before a home game against the San Francisco Giants.

Glavine ranks 21st all-time with 305 wins, including 244 with the Braves. He spent five years with the New York Mets from 2003-07 but played most of his career with manager Bobby Cox and pitching coach Leo Mazzone in Atlanta.

The left-hander joined Greg Maddux, who had his No. 31 retired by the Braves and Cubs last year, and John Smoltz in a dominant Braves rotation. The three combined to win seven Cy Young awards in the 1990s.

"Like most of my career, I was fortunate to play for a great manager and have a great pitching coach and have some great players around me," Glavine said. "That all made me better and it was just a great environment to play in."

He will become only the seventh Braves player to have his number retired, joining Maddux, Hank Aaron (44), Warren Spahn (21), Eddie Mathews (41), Dale Murphy (3) and Phil Niekro (35).

"Obviously it puts me in some pretty darn good company," Glavine said, "not only in the Atlanta Braves world, but also in the world of baseball. Those are guys who were great players. It's always special when you're put in that kind of company."

The left-hander finished his playing career with the Braves in 2008. He attempted a 2009 comeback from surgery on his left elbow and shoulder. He was bitter when he was released by the team after what he believed was a successful minor league rehab stint.

Glavine's relationship with the team was restored in February when he made his retirement official and was named a special assistant to team president John Schuerholz. He also works on some Braves radio and TV broadcasts as he decides what long-term role to pursue.

"Tom has been, and continues to be, a very special part of the Atlanta Braves organization," Schuerholz said, adding it was time Glavine's number "finds its rightful place alongside other great Braves Hall of Famers."

Glavine, a 10-time All-Star, was 244-147 with a 3.41 ERA in 17 seasons with Atlanta and 305-203 overall. He won Cy Young awards in 1991, when the Braves began their run of 14 straight division titles, and 1998.

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Good for him. I didn't know a Brave won the Cy Young 7/10 times in the 1990's, that's insane! We must have been the real deal, I didn't watch baseball then, I became a fan of the Braves in 2006, the year the "dynasty" stopped. THK and JHey is gonna get us another one going though.

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Good for him. I didn't know a Brave won the Cy Young 7/10 times in the 1990's, that's insane! We must have been the real deal, I didn't watch baseball then, I became a fan of the Braves in 2006, the year the "dynasty" stopped. THK and JHey is gonna get us another one going though.

The Braves pitching staff was just so sick back then. We won 6 Cy Youngs in a row and 7 out of 8. Maddux had 2 straight years with an ERA under 1.65 and 6 straight under 2.75. He used to pitch the shortest games you've ever seen, like 2 hour complete games where he threw 90 pitches (or less). So much fun to watch him just carve up hitters.

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The Braves pitching staff was just so sick back then. We won 6 Cy Youngs in a row and 7 out of 8. Maddux had 2 straight years with an ERA under 1.65 and 6 straight under 2.75. He used to pitch the shortest games you've ever seen, like 2 hour complete games where he threw 90 pitches (or less). So much fun to watch him just carve up hitters.

Well we got our "Smoltz", who can be our Maddux and Glavine? It sucks I missed it, I wish I loved baseball like I do now when I was younger.

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Well we got our "Smoltz", who can be our Maddux and Glavine? It sucks I missed it, I wish I loved baseball like I do now when I was younger.

I think Medlen could be our Glavine, though obviously from the right side and with different stuff.

No chance on another Maddux, though one day Teheran might be our Smoltz #2.

Note: I am not saying Medlen will be a 300 game winner or Hanson a Hall of Famer.

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Well we got our "Smoltz", who can be our Maddux and Glavine? It sucks I missed it, I wish I loved baseball like I do now when I was younger.

Chip and Joe were talking about crafty pitchers last night. They mentioned that almost only left handers are the crafters. Well, Greg Maddux was a true right handed crafter. He was an architect up there and had a blueprint for every batter. He was a true professor and he almost always knew what he was going to pitch several pitches before. Like John Smoltz said about Greg...

"Every pitch has a purpose. Sometimes he knows what he's going to throw two pitches ahead. I swear, he makes it look like guys are swinging foam bats against him."

Ok, to answer your question, I don't think we have the next Maddux. I don't the MLB has the next Maddux. I think Maddux is in a class by himself.

For Glavine, I think Mike Minor can possibly be him. He's been coined to have not an overpowering fastball but he hits his corners with ease, like Glavine. His best pitch is that change up like Glavine. Not saying he is the next Glavine, but his stuff could compare to Glavine's.

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As time passes, people are going too look back at those Braves rotations with even more awe than now, simply because they were putting up those kinds of numbers in the the thick of the Steroid Era too.

And not just Maddux, Glavine, and Smoltz, either. The Braves got some great work from guys like Steve Avery, Denny Neagle, John Burkett, and Kevin Millwood. We knew we had it good, but it looks even better in hindsight.

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As time passes, people are going too look back at those Braves rotations with even more awe than now, simply because they were putting up those kinds of numbers in the the thick of the Steroid Era too.

And not just Maddux, Glavine, and Smoltz, either. The Braves got some great work from guys like Steve Avery, Denny Neagle, John Burkett, and Kevin Millwood. We knew we had it good, but it looks even better in hindsight.

This to me is why Maddux might be the BEST pitcher of all time. To do what he did in that era without an overpowering fastball...just disgusting.

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This to me is why Maddux might be the BEST pitcher of all time. To do what he did in that era without an overpowering fastball...just disgusting.

he proved that with location and movement on your pitches, you can be a dominating SP without having to throw 95+

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As time passes, people are going too look back at those Braves rotations with even more awe than now, simply because they were putting up those kinds of numbers in the the thick of the Steroid Era too.

And not just Maddux, Glavine, and Smoltz, either. The Braves got some great work from guys like Steve Avery, Denny Neagle, John Burkett, and Kevin Millwood. We knew we had it good, but it looks even better in hindsight.

+1 from me just for that valid point.

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he proved that with location and movement on your pitches, you can be a dominating SP without having to throw 95+

I think it was Leo Mazzone on the radio the other day, but whoever it was, he was saying that Maddux would give signs to the catcher while he pitched by how he caught the ball from the catcher. Like if he caught the ball away from his body it meant he wanted to throw a changeup, or if he caught it on either side of his body it indicated the side of the plate he wanted to throw to with a fastball.

I can't remember the specific signs he said, so those were just my guesses.

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Just to let you guys know, if this game ends up being anything like the Maddux ceremony game it will be an awesome game to be at.

I went to the Maddux ceremony game last season and the fans really came out in force to be there. It was a sell out and the stadium was full of Braves fans which is really rare now. The crowd was great and it was just an awesome atmosphere.

Hopefully Glavine will get the same and I hope to be there.

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The Braves pitching staff was just so sick back then. We won 6 Cy Youngs in a row and 7 out of 8. Maddux had 2 straight years with an ERA under 1.65 and 6 straight under 2.75. He used to pitch the shortest games you've ever seen, like 2 hour complete games where he threw 90 pitches (or less). So much fun to watch him just carve up hitters.

Those were the days. :(

I think Medlen could be our Glavine, though obviously from the right side and with different stuff.

No chance on another Maddux, though one day Teheran might be our Smoltz #2.

Note: I am not saying Medlen will be a 300 game winner or Hanson a Hall of Famer.

There can never be another Maddux but Jurrjens does pitch a lot like Maddux. He likes to throw back up 2-seamer to lefties like Maddux did a lot. He likes to get ground ball outs. They are both great fielders, help them self with the bat and don't clog up the bases.

As time passes, people are going too look back at those Braves rotations with even more awe than now, simply because they were putting up those kinds of numbers in the the thick of the Steroid Era too.

And not just Maddux, Glavine, and Smoltz, either. The Braves got some great work from guys like Steve Avery, Denny Neagle, John Burkett, and Kevin Millwood. We knew we had it good, but it looks even better in hindsight.

Totally.

This to me is why Maddux might be the BEST pitcher of all time. To do what he did in that era without an overpowering fastball...just disgusting.

Yep. Roger Clemens be damned.

Just to let you guys know, if this game ends up being anything like the Maddux ceremony game it will be an awesome game to be at.

I went to the Maddux ceremony game last season and the fans really came out in force to be there. It was a sell out and the stadium was full of Braves fans which is really rare now. The crowd was great and it was just an awesome atmosphere.

Hopefully Glavine will get the same and I hope to be there.

The crowds so far this year have been great. They sound really loud on the radio and tv.

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