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Help me Braves fan


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Now I have been watching baseball pretty much all my life and have been a Braves fan as well. I understand there is no salary cap in baseball but you have certain teams(Braves included) who seem to have a self inflicted cap. My question is why is that so and other teams such as the Yankees & Phillies go out and spend a seemingly substantial amount of dollars on bringing in free agents while Atlanta appears to be OK with standing pat.

Thanks in advance!

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Now I have been watching baseball pretty much all my life and have been a Braves fan as well. I understand there is no salary cap in baseball but you have certain teams(Braves included) who seem to have a self inflicted cap. My question is why is that so and other teams such as the Yankees & Phillies go out and spend a seemingly substantial amount of dollars on bringing in free agents while Atlanta appears to be OK with standing pat.

Thanks in advance!

Like all businesses, baseball teams have to balance expenditures against incoming revenue streams.

The Yankees, for example, have the advantages of having its own cable television distribution through its YES Network, an advantage not shared by most other teams. They also have the advantage of playing in the largest population city in the United States, which generates consideranbly more revenue than a team playing in a smaller market town. It's not a coincidence that teams with higher payrolls tend to play in larger cities. Ballparks also figure largely in the revenue streams of a franchise; most teams work on having a facility that they control, but have other people (most often taxpayers) actually build.

That's not to say that teams in smaller markets can't compete, but the margin for error when it comes to signing a free agent, making a trades, or selecting a draft pick is much smaller. The Yankees and other large market teams can make mistakes too, but can often get out of it by spending.

Liberty Media Group bought the Braves in February 2007. While the exact budget they provide the Braves is not known, the Braves are believed to have between $95,000,000 to $100,000,000 to spend on player salaries. That puts them around 12th in terms of payroll among the 30 major league teams. Comparable payrolls to ours would be St. Louis, Houston, San Francisco, Cleveland, and Toronto.

Hope this helps.

Edited by K26dp
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As it stands right now, the Braves have committed $82,400,334 to 12 players: Derek Lowe, Chipper Jones, Javier Vazquez, Tim Hudson, Kenshin Kawakami, Billy Wagner, Brian McCann, Nate McLouth, Takashi Saito, Matt Diaz, Omar Infante, and David Ross.

They have salary control over 8 other likely Braves: Jair Jurrjens, Yunel Escobar, Martin Prado, Jesse Chavez, Tommy Hanson, Kris Medlen, Jordan Schafer, and Eric O'Flaherty. This means the Braves can essentially decide what salary to pay these players, as long as it's at least $400,000. Some key contributers, like Jurrjens and Secobar, will likely get a little bit more. Count on this group collectively to earn around $3,500,000.

There are two players, Peter Moylan and Boone Logan, who have the right to have their salary determined by arbitration. It's uncertain now how much they'll get, but consensus is that Moylan will get a salary in the neighborhood of $1,500,000 and Logan around $600,000.

So these 22 players will account for around $87,400,934 of a budget between $95,000,000-$100,000,000. The Braves will not likely want to go to the top of their budget in spring training, in case they need to make a trade or a signing to back-fill a key injured or underperforming player.

Most baseball writers say the Braves have about $9,000,000 to spend right now. However, it's no secret that the Braves are interesting in trading Derek Lowe to free up more of the budget. Lowe's salary is highest on the team currently, at $15 million/year through 2012.

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well put k26dp.. Baseball does have somewhat of a salary cap in the sense of a luxury tax imposed on anyone spending more than a specified amount. The kicker on that though is that money can be reinvested into the stadium reducing their other revenue sharing expenditures as well. Some accountants got very rich out of this NY deal

Yankee Stadium Tax Breaks

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  • 1 month later...

With the announcement that Moylan has signed a contract, we can get pretty close to what the Braves' payroll is.

Lowe $15,000,000

C. Jones $14,000,000

Hudson $9,500,000

Kawakami $7,333,667

Wagner $6,750,000

McCann $5,666,667

McLouth $5,000,000

Saito $3,700,000

Cabrera $2,600,000 ($3.1 million minus $500k from Yankees)

Diaz $2,500,000

Infante $2,225,000

Glaus $2,000,000 (assuming most easily reached incentives, could go to $4 million)

Ross $1,600,000

Moylan $1,150,000

Hinske $1,000,000

Jurrjens @ $550,000

Escobar @ $550,000

Prado @ $500,000

O'Flaherty @ $500,000

Hanson @ $450,000

Chavez @ $450,000

Medlen @ $450,000

Heyward $400,000

Dunn $400,000

Conrad $400,000

This factors in some signing bonuses and easily reached incentives, for a payroll of $89,775,334. Some more incentives get made and the payroll will easily trip over $90,000,000.

While this may look like a payroll reduction from the past couple years, the Braves in those years were getting the benefit of insurance payments on the contracts of injured players like Mike Hampton and Tim Hudson. Those payments were going back into the payroll. Take out those insurance pay-outs, and the payrolls would be around the same as this season.

The players with the "@" next to their names have their rights owned by the Braves, do not have a contract for 2010, and aren't eligible for arbitration. Their salaries will essentially set by the club, so the salaries listed are estimates. Final roster composition is also somewhat of a guess. For example, the last infielder job could be Brooks Conrad, Diory Hernandez, Joe Thurston, or even Brandon Hicks. If Heyward doesn't earn a starting job, then that opens the door for Jordan Schaffer or Gregor Blanco. And the front end of the bullpen could include several choices not listed above. Regardless, the salaries listed would not significantly change depending on who won those jobs.

The only exception to that would be Scott Proctor. He is signed to a minor league contract, but would earn a $750,000 salary if on the major league roster.

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With the announcement that Moylan has signed a contract, we can get pretty close to what the Braves' payroll is.

Lowe $15,000,000

C. Jones $14,000,000

Hudson $9,500,000

Kawakami $7,333,667

Wagner $6,750,000

McCann $5,666,667

McLouth $5,000,000

Saito $3,700,000

Cabrera $2,600,000 ($3.1 million minus $500k from Yankees)

Diaz $2,500,000

Infante $2,225,000

Glaus $2,000,000 (assuming most easily reached incentives, could go to $4 million)

Ross $1,600,000

Moylan $1,150,000

Hinske $1,000,000

Jurrjens @ $550,000

Escobar @ $550,000

Prado @ $500,000

O'Flaherty @ $500,000

Hanson @ $450,000

Chavez @ $450,000

Medlen @ $450,000

Heyward $400,000

Dunn $400,000

Conrad $400,000

This factors in some signing bonuses and easily reached incentives, for a payroll of $89,775,334. Some more incentives get made and the payroll will easily trip over $90,000,000.

While this may look like a payroll reduction from the past couple years, the Braves in those years were getting the benefit of insurance payments on the contracts of injured players like Mike Hampton and Tim Hudson. Those payments were going back into the payroll. Take out those insurance pay-outs, and the payrolls would be around the same as this season.

The players with the "@" next to their names have their rights owned by the Braves, do not have a contract for 2010, and aren't eligible for arbitration. Their salaries will essentially set by the club, so the salaries listed are estimates. Final roster composition is also somewhat of a guess. For example, the last infielder job could be Brooks Conrad, Diory Hernandez, Joe Thurston, or even Brandon Hicks. If Heyward doesn't earn a starting job, then that opens the door for Jordan Schaffer or Gregor Blanco. And the front end of the bullpen could include several choices not listed above. Regardless, the salaries listed would not significantly change depending on who won those jobs.

The only exception to that would be Scott Proctor. He is signed to a minor league contract, but would earn a $750,000 salary if on the major league roster.

I'm further enlightened, preciate it sir! Good info.

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