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MorganGrafixx
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Now I know this probably isn't the right place for this, but I wanted to make sure as many people as possible see it. Tomorrow is Veteran's Day and today (November 10th) is the 234th birthday of the United States Marine Corps. I wanted to share with everyone my greatest memory from my Marine Corps career.

I was on a funeral detail in 2003 burying a retired Colonel. It was about 90° that day. The guys on my rifle squad that were performing the 21-gun salute stood in the heat in our dress blue uniforms for over an hour while the funeral precession filed in. The priest gave the sermon, we fired our 21 rounds into the air and the other Marines folded the flag. Afterwards, we piled into our vehicle to head back to base. There was a gas station close by so we voted to stop so that we could all get something cold to drink. We all walked into the store, back to the coolers, chose our drinks and took them to the counter to pay. The man behind the register told us that our money was no good and insisted that we each go grab another one for each of us incase we finished the ones we had. Needless to say, we were very appreciative. We thanked the man again and filed out of the store. We stood around outside the van, wasting time so that we didn't have to cramp back up into the tight van until everyone was ready to go. About a minute later, a totally unremarkable car pulled up and a little girl no older than 6 or 7 got out of the passenger side. She walked straight over to me and I could see that she was crying. About a million things were running through my head at that time. I didn't know if someone had hit her, stolen something from her...I couldn't figure it out. I was about to ask when she grabbed my hands pulled them around her and gave me a hug. "Thank you for what you did for my grandpa." My throat snapped shut and swallowing became almost impossible. Apparently, the Colonel we had just buried was her grandfather. I fought it for about 10 seconds, but even I wasn't strong enough to hold back tears. Picture a battle-hardened, 200 lb. US. Marine in dress blues crying like a little baby. That little girl will be in my memory until the day I die.

So, even though it may not seem like much, a simple "thank you" from a little girl I met at a gas station meant more to me than anything I can remember. So if you have family, friends, co-workers or neighbors that have served or are currently serving, tell them thank you.

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Now I know this probably isn't the right place for this, but I wanted to make sure as many people as possible see it. Tomorrow is Veteran's Day and today (November 10th) is the 234th birthday of the United States Marine Corps. I wanted to share with everyone my greatest memory from my Marine Corps career.

I was on a funeral detail in 2003 burying a retired Colonel. It was about 90° that day. The guys on my rifle squad that were performing the 21-gun salute stood in the heat in our dress blue uniforms for over an hour while the funeral precession filed in. The priest gave the sermon, we fired our 21 rounds into the air and the other Marines folded the flag. Afterwards, we piled into our vehicle to head back to base. There was a gas station close by so we voted to stop so that we could all get something cold to drink. We all walked into the store, back to the coolers, chose our drinks and took them to the counter to pay. The man behind the register told us that our money was no good and insisted that we each go grab another one for each of us incase we finished the ones we had. Needless to say, we were very appreciative. We thanked the man again and filed out of the store. We stood around outside the van, wasting time so that we didn't have to cramp back up into the tight van until everyone was ready to go. About a minute later, a totally unremarkable car pulled up and a little girl no older than 6 or 7 got out of the passenger side. She walked straight over to me and I could see that she was crying. About a million things were running through my head at that time. I didn't know if someone had hit her, stolen something from her...I couldn't figure it out. I was about to ask when she grabbed my hands pulled them around her and gave me a hug. "Thank you for what you did for my grandpa." My throat snapped shut and swallowing became almost impossible. Apparently, the Colonel we had just buried was her grandfather. I fought it for about 10 seconds, but even I wasn't strong enough to hold back tears. Picture a battle-hardened, 200 lb. US. Marine in dress blues crying like a little baby. That little girl will be in my memory until the day I die.

So, even though it may not seem like much, a simple "thank you" from a little girl I met at a gas station meant more to me than anything I can remember. So if you have family, friends, co-workers or neighbors that have served or are currently serving, tell them thank you.

Thanks for the story. I would have lost it as well. I have a cousin in the marines, as well as a friend in the Army who is getting deployed. I always thank them for their service, and I thank you as well for yours. Happy Veterans Day and God Bless America.

Edited by ConnFalcon
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Now I know this probably isn't the right place for this, but I wanted to make sure as many people as possible see it. Tomorrow is Veteran's Day and today (November 10th) is the 234th birthday of the United States Marine Corps. I wanted to share with everyone my greatest memory from my Marine Corps career.

I was on a funeral detail in 2003 burying a retired Colonel. It was about 90° that day. The guys on my rifle squad that were performing the 21-gun salute stood in the heat in our dress blue uniforms for over an hour while the funeral precession filed in. The priest gave the sermon, we fired our 21 rounds into the air and the other Marines folded the flag. Afterwards, we piled into our vehicle to head back to base. There was a gas station close by so we voted to stop so that we could all get something cold to drink. We all walked into the store, back to the coolers, chose our drinks and took them to the counter to pay. The man behind the register told us that our money was no good and insisted that we each go grab another one for each of us incase we finished the ones we had. Needless to say, we were very appreciative. We thanked the man again and filed out of the store. We stood around outside the van, wasting time so that we didn't have to cramp back up into the tight van until everyone was ready to go. About a minute later, a totally unremarkable car pulled up and a little girl no older than 6 or 7 got out of the passenger side. She walked straight over to me and I could see that she was crying. About a million things were running through my head at that time. I didn't know if someone had hit her, stolen something from her...I couldn't figure it out. I was about to ask when she grabbed my hands pulled them around her and gave me a hug. "Thank you for what you did for my grandpa." My throat snapped shut and swallowing became almost impossible. Apparently, the Colonel we had just buried was her grandfather. I fought it for about 10 seconds, but even I wasn't strong enough to hold back tears. Picture a battle-hardened, 200 lb. US. Marine in dress blues crying like a little baby. That little girl will be in my memory until the day I die.

So, even though it may not seem like much, a simple "thank you" from a little girl I met at a gas station meant more to me than anything I can remember. So if you have family, friends, co-workers or neighbors that have served or are currently serving, tell them thank you.

Semper Fi from one veteran to another. After being in the Air Force for 19 years and taking early retirement, I appreciate the veterans now more than ever.

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Now I know this probably isn't the right place for this, but I wanted to make sure as many people as possible see it. Tomorrow is Veteran's Day and today (November 10th) is the 234th birthday of the United States Marine Corps. I wanted to share with everyone my greatest memory from my Marine Corps career.

I was on a funeral detail in 2003 burying a retired Colonel. It was about 90° that day. The guys on my rifle squad that were performing the 21-gun salute stood in the heat in our dress blue uniforms for over an hour while the funeral precession filed in. The priest gave the sermon, we fired our 21 rounds into the air and the other Marines folded the flag. Afterwards, we piled into our vehicle to head back to base. There was a gas station close by so we voted to stop so that we could all get something cold to drink. We all walked into the store, back to the coolers, chose our drinks and took them to the counter to pay. The man behind the register told us that our money was no good and insisted that we each go grab another one for each of us incase we finished the ones we had. Needless to say, we were very appreciative. We thanked the man again and filed out of the store. We stood around outside the van, wasting time so that we didn't have to cramp back up into the tight van until everyone was ready to go. About a minute later, a totally unremarkable car pulled up and a little girl no older than 6 or 7 got out of the passenger side. She walked straight over to me and I could see that she was crying. About a million things were running through my head at that time. I didn't know if someone had hit her, stolen something from her...I couldn't figure it out. I was about to ask when she grabbed my hands pulled them around her and gave me a hug. "Thank you for what you did for my grandpa." My throat snapped shut and swallowing became almost impossible. Apparently, the Colonel we had just buried was her grandfather. I fought it for about 10 seconds, but even I wasn't strong enough to hold back tears. Picture a battle-hardened, 200 lb. US. Marine in dress blues crying like a little baby. That little girl will be in my memory until the day I die.

So, even though it may not seem like much, a simple "thank you" from a little girl I met at a gas station meant more to me than anything I can remember. So if you have family, friends, co-workers or neighbors that have served or are currently serving, tell them thank you.

Thanks for choking me up at work, Jarhead. ;)

Semper Fi and Happy Birthday!

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thanks for the story..

i know for me a lot of times its easy to not think of these soldiers as actual people with families and friends and things... even that fox broadcast this sunday with all of them talking about football and some had their team jersey's out, was cool to me.. its easy to forget that they are people..

thanks to those who have served and those currently serving....

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Thanks to all of our Veterans and Active Servicemen! What you do for us is beyond comprehension for most of us.

Special Hollah Out:

I love you Jason Parks - keep your head down over there in Afghanistan and come home to us soon! Your wife, baby son and daughter miss you and so do we!

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Prayer For A Soldier

If ever there was a time for a prayer to be heard.

And now is the time, to hear every word.

Now that our boys called soldiers have gone,

Please march with them and keep them strong.

Stand beside them if they have to fight,

And in the darkness be their light.

Don’t desert them, march in their faith,

So they’ll be here when the morning breaks.

Bring them home safe and sound,

Across the waters to peaceful ground.

Home to loved ones, mother’s wives, daughters, sons,

Bless them all, each and every one.

They stand for freedom and make our flag true,

These boys called soldiers for the red, white and blue.

A prayer for a soldier, please let it be heard,

And please Lord, hear every word.

A prayer for a soldier, with the job to be done,

Please bring them home, these soldiers your sons.

Please bring them home, the soldiers, your sons.

AMEN.

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Wow! How's this for some Veterans Day irony? :mellow:

Article

Milwaukee muggers see Army ID, return wallet

By CARRIE ANTLFINGER

The Associated Press

MILWAUKEE — A Milwaukee Army reservist's military identification earned him some street cred Tuesday, when he says four men who mugged him at gunpoint returned his belongings and thanked him for his service after finding the ID.

Today on accessAtlanta

The 21-year-old University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee student said he was walking home from work about 1:15 a.m. Tuesday when he was pulled into an alley and told to lay face down and with a gun to his neck. Four men took his wallet, $16, keys, his cell phone and even a PowerBar wrapper from his pants pockets, he said.

But the hostile tone quickly changed when one of the robbers, whom the reservist presumed was the leader, saw an Army ID in the wallet. The robber told the others to return the items and they put most of his belongings on the ground next to him, including the wrapper, the reservist said.

"The guy continued to say throughout the situation that he respects what I do and at one point he actually thanked me and he actually apologized," said the reservist, who asked not to be identified Tuesday because the robbers still had his keys.

The reservist said he asked the men, who all had hoods or hats covering their faces, if he could get up and they said he could before starting to walk away.

"The leader of the group actually walked back, gave me a quick fist bump, which was very strange," he said.

Milwaukee police spokeswoman Anne E. Schwartz said the reservist is credible and that officers still were looking for the suspects Tuesday.

The reservist didn't realize until later that his keys were not with him and he doesn't know if the robbers intended to keep those, he said. Still, he said he feels lucky.

"I'm just kind of awe struck that everything was given back to me due to just being in the military, " he said. "I realize in pretty much every other situation that wouldn't happen."

He said he's never been deployed, only having signed up for the Army Reserves about a year ago. He said he is the first person in his immediate family to join the military.

Schwartz said there were two other incidents within 40 minutes in the same area and police suspect the four men were involved in all of them. The robbers were unsuccessful at 12:35 a.m., when the 39-year-old man they approached ran into the street and started screaming.

Schwartz said within 10 minutes of that they approached a 47-year-old man — a convicted burglar who had a Department of Corrections inmate ID in his wallet — ordered him to the ground and pointed a gun at him. They took his wallet, apparently unfazed by that ID.

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