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make it happen Wren.....get rid of that turtle head looking jack hole in the dugout.

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Hitting coach 'wanted some security'

DALLAS -- Longtime hitting coach Rudy Jaramillo rejected a one-year contract offer and will not return to the Texas Rangers next season, it was announced Wednesday.

Jaramillo's contract will expire on Oct. 31, and he will become a free agent at that time. Jaramillo, 59, had been the Rangers' hitting coach since 1995.

"It goes without saying that Rudy has given 15 outstanding years of service," Rangers general manager Jon Daniels said in a conference call with reporters Wednesday. "He will definitely be missed. We wish him the best wherever it is that he ends up landing."

Jaramillo, who had interviewed for the New York Mets' managerial position after the 2004 season, leaves with an impressive résumé. Before 2009, his offenses were consistently at or near the top of the American League. Under his watchful eye, the Rangers had four MVPs (Juan Gonzalez [2], Pudge Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez), a batting title (Michael Young), 17 Silver Slugger awards, three home run titles and three RBI titles.

"The Rangers did what they felt they had to do in offering me a one-year deal," Jaramillo said. "That's understandable with the sale of the club and the situation the club is in. I just felt that I wanted some security, and the way to get security is to go out and find out where you stand on the market.

"I don't think this opportunity comes around all the time and I don't want to end my career and say, 'Man, I should have done it.' I want to thank the Rangers. It was just a decision I made."

Rangers president Nolan Ryan said the club met with Jaramillo after the season about how to improve the offense, which scored only 784 runs -- the fewest since Jaramillo was hired. The team hit .260, the lowest average since moving into Rangers Ballpark in Arlington in 1994, and the .320 on-base percentage ranked 12th in the AL.

"You had a lot of young kids that were inexperienced," Jaramillo said. "It was all mental. You saw mechanical issues, but the problem was trusting themselves at the big league level. They put pressure on themselves and they wanted to excel and the harder they tried, the tougher it got."

Richard Durrett and the rest of the ESPNDallas.com team have the inside scoop on the Rangers, the American League and Major League Baseball. Blog.

Said Ryan: "We were all disappointed in the number of strikeouts and the lack of walks. We felt like for us to move forward, that was an area we had to stress with the hitters, like maybe have a different approach on two strikes. [Rudy] was in agreement with that."

Daniels, who said he was a little surprised that Jaramillo rejected the offer, said the club hasn't put together a list of candidates to fill the position. Jaramillo's last two contracts were multiyear deals, but Daniels said that Jaramillo specifically mentioned that the one-year offer was not a factor in his decision to leave the club.

Manager Ron Washington mentioned situational hitting as a big concern. The Rangers were 20th in the majors in runs scored and RBIs with runners in scoring position.

"I think we were very inconsistent at [situational hitting], and the players have to take the acceptance of that not being done," Washington said. "That's something we have to harp on in spring training -- play to the situation in the ballgame."

Jaramillo believes the Rangers' young hitters will figure it out and improve next season.

"They'll get there," Jaramillo said. "They are good hitters, you just have to be patient. Injuries hurt us too. Hambone [Josh Hamilton] is such a big part of this offense. If he was healthy and even close to last year, the whole season is different. Ian [Kinsler] was hurt for a while and [Michael] Young, too. That hurt."

Richard Durrett covers the Rangers for ESPNDallas.com. E-mail richard.durrett@espn3.com. Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.

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What's not to like? There is a reason the Rangers have one of the top offenses in baseball year in and year out with different players. The guy can flatout teach guys how to hit.

The Rangers also typically lead or are near the lead in strikeouts, and are middle of the pack in OBA. And I suspect that the Rangers during much of his tutelage also were pharmaceutically enhanced. Since 2003, the Rangers have steadily gotten worse as a team, which I suspect is the main indicator that a lot of the Rangers offensive success prior to that has more to do with the players' steroid and HGH suppliers than the batting coach.

The Braves problem right now is that we have a batting coach who values "being aggressive" more than "scoring runs". Jaramillo has essentially the same philosophy. He's hit and miss about developing young players (say, how's Jared Saltalamachia these days?).

In other words, there's a reason why the Rangers are letting Jaramillo walk without a fight. Here's a quote from Nolan Ryan:

"We were all disappointed in the number of strikeouts and the lack of walks. We felt like for us to move forward, that was an area we had to stress with the hitters, like maybe have a different approach on two strikes. [Rudy] was in agreement with that."

Edited by K26dp
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Well if we get him which I hope to God we do I would want Frenchy back real bad. It was TP's fault why he was not playing good.

Well, and Jaramillo also gave him crap instruction. Yes, he fixed Francouer's swing for a few weeks, but he didn't help his approach or pitch selection. This is a recurring theme, and the reason why he's not returning to the Rangers. Jaramillo is a superb hitting technician. Something wrong with your swing? Jaramillo is a great guy to see. But his hitting philosophy is exactly wrong for any club.

And there's absolutely no reason to want Francouer back, ever.

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Well, and Jaramillo also gave him crap instruction. Yes, he fixed Francouer's swing for a few weeks, but he didn't help his approach or pitch selection. This is a recurring theme, and the reason why he's not returning to the Rangers. Jaramillo is a superb hitting technician. Something wrong with your swing? Jaramillo is a great guy to see. But his hitting philosophy is exactly wrong for any club.

And there's absolutely no reason to want Francouer back, ever.

Mark DeRosa has been a pretty **** good hitter after he went to the Rangers for that 1 year. Also Frenchy had a pretty good 2nd half with the Mets. But I'm starting to get the feeling you're a Billy Bean type guy. Someone who thinks walks and OBP are the only thing that matters. I don't give a rats *** if a guy walks 20 times or 120 times if he has a high batting average and is driving in runs I'm all for it. Last time I checked the main goal to win games was scoring more runs than the other team. Not the team with the most runs. Not the team with the highest OPB.

Oh and speaking of Billy Bean how many World Series have the A's won since he took over? How many playoff series have the A's won since he took over? I know you can say the same thing about the Rangers but their problem has always been pitching till this year and they still didn't have enough to keep up with the Angels or Red Sox. The Angels have the perfect offense. Not only do they walk alot and get on base but they actually turn those walks into runs with stolen bases and hits and runs. That's something Bobby forgot how to do a long time ago. Back when we had Nixon, Sanders and Gant and other guys we would do that.

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A "Billy Beane kind of guy" am I? Someone who thinks walks and OBP are the only things that matter? Congratulations sir, I now know that conclusively that you have no idea what you are talking about.

Yes, I value OBP, because it's the main indicator of how often a hitter doesn't get out. If a hitter doesn't get out, that means he's done something valuable. Yes, a home run is better than a walk. A double is better than a walk. More often than not, a single is better than a walk. But sometimes the pitcher won't let a hitter hit a home run. Sometimes a walk is the best a hitter is going to get. A hitter with a good approach, a good eye, and some smarts is going to take what the pitcher gives him, because no matter how good a hitter is, the pitcher is going to win a majority of the time.

That's why the best hitters in the league are guys who can hit the other way, take a walk when a walk is all you can get, and hit the ball out of the park when the pitcher makes a mistake. That's why they make the big bucks, and that's why they win MVP trophies and WS titles. And guess what? Invariably, they're the ones that have good OBP.

Oh and speaking of Billy Bean how many World Series have the A's won since he took over? How many playoff series have the A's won since he took over? I know you can say the same thing about the Rangers but their problem has always been pitching till this year and they still didn't have enough to keep up with the Angels or Red Sox. The Angels have the perfect offense. Not only do they walk alot and get on base but they actually turn those walks into runs with stolen bases and hits and runs. That's something Bobby forgot how to do a long time ago. Back when we had Nixon, Sanders and Gant and other guys we would do that.

So the Rangers get a pass because of poor personel, but not the A's? How many playoff appearances have the A's had on a shoe-string budget, and compare that to Jaramillo's Rangers.

The Angels do have a great offense, and it's because of their approach (and talent). They take what the pitcher gives them, they have long offensive innings, and they maximize their rallies by NOT MAKING OUTS. The stolen bases are icing on the cake. As for Bobby "forgetting" how to do that... tell me how long it's been since he's had top-of-the-order guys like Otis Nixon. Sanders? He was flashy, he stole bases when he had the chance, but he didn't score many runs because he didn't get on base enough. You know scoring runs, the "main goal to win games"? That's why when we went from Sanders to Grissom (by way of Roberto Kelly) it was an upgrade for the team; even though Grissom didn't steal as many bases for the Braves (though his SB% was excellent), he scored a TON of runs.

It's a simple concept. The more times you get on base, the more runs you are likely to score. That's not a "Billy Beane thing", it's common sense.

For DeRosa, his problem was never with his approach, it was his mechanics. Jaramillo, as I said earlier, is a master at the mechanics of hitting. He is great for working out the kinks in a hitters' swing. That's exactly the kind of instruction that DeRo needed.

Alas, Franceour's problems after 2008 were three-fold: his mechanics sucked, he had no grasp for situational hitting, and no grasp for pitch selection. Jaramillo helped him with the first thing, and that's why you saw him do well the first couple weeks of the season. After that, pitchers learned that despite his better bat speed and being able to adjust better at the plate, you could still fool him, and he would still hit to the pitchers' strengths. His improvement after his trade to the Mets should be attributed to the Mets' hitting coach (and to Francouer himself) more than Jaramillo, who had his hands full with a Rangers offensive that was seeing across-the-board production drops. And even with Francouer's improvement, he still makes enough outs to make him an offensive liabilty.

Edited by K26dp
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A "Billy Beane kind of guy" am I? Someone who thinks walks and OBP are the only things that matter? Congratulations sir, I now know that conclusively that you have no idea what you are talking about.

Yes, I value OBP, because it's the main indicator of how often a hitter doesn't get out. If a hitter doesn't get out, that means he's done something valuable. Yes, a home run is better than a walk. A double is better than a walk. More often than not, a single is better than a walk. But sometimes the pitcher won't let a hitter hit a home run. Sometimes a walk is the best a hitter is going to get. A hitter with a good approach, a good eye, and some smarts is going to take what the pitcher gives him, because no matter how good a hitter is, the pitcher is going to win a majority of the time.

That's why the best hitters in the league are guys who can hit the other way, take a walk when a walk is all you can get, and hit the ball out of the park when the pitcher makes a mistake. That's why they make the big bucks, and that's why they win MVP trophies and WS titles. And guess what? Invariably, they're the ones that have good OBP.

So the Rangers get a pass because of poor personel, but not the A's? How many playoff appearances have the A's had on a shoe-string budget, and compare that to Jaramillo's Rangers.

The Angels do have a great offense, and it's because of their approach (and talent). They take what the pitcher gives them, they have long offensive innings, and they maximize their rallies by NOT MAKING OUTS. The stolen bases are icing on the cake. As for Bobby "forgetting" how to do that... tell me how long it's been since he's had top-of-the-order guys like Otis Nixon. Sanders? He was flashy, he stole bases when he had the chance, but he didn't score many runs because he didn't get on base enough. You know scoring runs, the "main goal to win games"? That's why when we went from Sanders to Grissom (by way of Roberto Kelly) it was an upgrade for the team; even though Grissom didn't steal as many bases for the Braves (though his SB% was excellent), he scored a TON of runs.

It's a simple concept. The more times you get on base, the more runs you are likely to score. That's not a "Billy Beane thing", it's common sense.

For DeRosa, his problem was never with his approach, it was his mechanics. Jaramillo, as I said earlier, is a master at the mechanics of hitting. He is great for working out the kinks in a hitters' swing. That's exactly the kind of instruction that DeRo needed.

Alas, Franceour's problems after 2008 were three-fold: his mechanics sucked, he had no grasp for situational hitting, and no grasp for pitch selection. Jaramillo helped him with the first thing, and that's why you saw him do well the first couple weeks of the season. After that, pitchers learned that despite his better bat speed and being able to adjust better at the plate, you could still fool him, and he would still hit to the pitchers' strengths. His improvement after his trade to the Mets should be attributed to the Mets' hitting coach (and to Francouer himself) more than Jaramillo, who had his hands full with a Rangers offensive that was seeing across-the-board production drops. And even with Francouer's improvement, he still makes enough outs to make him an offensive liabilty.

And how many complete players do the Braves have? ZERO! Everyone would love to have a lineup full of Albert Pujolses but fact is there are only 10, maybe 15 guys in the entire major leagues that have a high average, OPB, Walk and hit for a ton of homeruns. The Braves don't have any of those guys. It ******* sucks having to watch us struggle and craw and stratch out a walk and a couple of hits to score just 1 or 2 runs. Then we turn around and the Phillies get a couple walks and the next guy comes up and pops one and they get 3 runs just like that. It takes all the air out of the balloon just like that. I was not suggesting we should have or need to get Francoeur back. Just saying he did better for the Mets than us. I'm just saying I'd much rather that a 40 homerun guy with an average OBP over a guy that has and outstanding OBP but is lucky to hit 10 homeruns. It takes 4 walks in 1 inning to score the same amount of runs 1 homerun gives you. How many times do pitches walk 4 guys in 1 inning? Not very often because they usually don't get the chance.

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And how many complete players do the Braves have? ZERO! Everyone would love to have a lineup full of Albert Pujolses but fact is there are only 10, maybe 15 guys in the entire major leagues that have a high average, OPB, Walk and hit for a ton of homeruns. The Braves don't have any of those guys.

Chipper Jones has been an OPS machine over the course of his career. I see no reason why young talented hitters like Escobar, McLouth, Prado, McCann, or even Kelly Johnson couldn't improve both themselves and create more runs with a better approach that what we've seen over the last couple years. Obviously you can't have a line-up of Pujolses. But there's no reason that the Phillies line-up, on talent alone and aside from Ryan Howard, should necessarily better than the Braves. The difference is that the Phillies' approach to hitting it better.

It ******* sucks having to watch us struggle and craw and stratch out a walk and a couple of hits to score just 1 or 2 runs.

Yep. And it usually comes because the hitter gives away the out by being overly aggressive. I'm not just talking about walks here. I'm talking about waiting on a pitch the hitter can handle, not swinging at pitcher's pitches, and working the count. Sometimes the hitter will walk in that situation, but it's more likely that a pitcher will make a mistake in the strikezone that can be hit. OBP is not just a "walk" statistic, it's about how tough of an out the hitter is. There's no reason to think that our hitters can't be tougher outs.

The fact that Francouer, the EASIEST OUT IN THE GAME, showed even modest improvement once he got away from the Braves, speaks volumes. Even marginal improvements in approach and pay dividends, not just in OBP, but in power numbers as well. There's a reason why gains in one stat usually cause gains in the other.

I'm just saying I'd much rather that a 40 homerun guy with an average OBP over a guy that has and outstanding OBP but is lucky to hit 10 homeruns. It takes 4 walks in 1 inning to score the same amount of runs 1 homerun gives you. How many times do pitches walk 4 guys in 1 inning? Not very often because they usually don't get the chance

You're making a false choice. You say yourself that you can't have an entire line-up of Pujolses. Well, you can't really have a line-up of 40 HR, low OBP guys either. You have to make the best out of what you've got. I think Escobar could be an elite hitter... 30 HR, 120 runs scored a season... with just a little better approach.

The thing about home runs is that it's not just the hitter that produces them. The pitcher generally has to make a mistake. A guy like Francouer's problem is not his strength, or his capability to swat the ball into the stands, it's his approach. He swings at too many pitchers' pitches, usually early in the count. A guy like Adam Dunn is valuable because he destroys mistakes, and if the pitcher doesn't make a mistake he won't just give up an out by hitting the ball weakly somewhere. He's not afraid to take a walk and let the next guy try to punish a mistake.

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Chipper Jones has been an OPS machine over the course of his career. I see no reason why young talented hitters like Escobar, McLouth, Prado, McCann, or even Kelly Johnson couldn't improve both themselves and create more runs with a better approach that what we've seen over the last couple years. Obviously you can't have a line-up of Pujolses. But there's no reason that the Phillies line-up, on talent alone and aside from Ryan Howard, should necessarily better than the Braves. The difference is that the Phillies' approach to hitting it better.

Yep. And it usually comes because the hitter gives away the out by being overly aggressive. I'm not just talking about walks here. I'm talking about waiting on a pitch the hitter can handle, not swinging at pitcher's pitches, and working the count. Sometimes the hitter will walk in that situation, but it's more likely that a pitcher will make a mistake in the strikezone that can be hit. OBP is not just a "walk" statistic, it's about how tough of an out the hitter is. There's no reason to think that our hitters can't be tougher outs.

The fact that Francouer, the EASIEST OUT IN THE GAME, showed even modest improvement once he got away from the Braves, speaks volumes. Even marginal improvements in approach and pay dividends, not just in OBP, but in power numbers as well. There's a reason why gains in one stat usually cause gains in the other.

You're making a false choice. You say yourself that you can't have an entire line-up of Pujolses. Well, you can't really have a line-up of 40 HR, low OBP guys either. You have to make the best out of what you've got. I think Escobar could be an elite hitter... 30 HR, 120 runs scored a season... with just a little better approach.

The thing about home runs is that it's not just the hitter that produces them. The pitcher generally has to make a mistake. A guy like Francouer's problem is not his strength, or his capability to swat the ball into the stands, it's his approach. He swings at too many pitchers' pitches, usually early in the count. A guy like Adam Dunn is valuable because he destroys mistakes, and if the pitcher doesn't make a mistake he won't just give up an out by hitting the ball weakly somewhere. He's not afraid to take a walk and let the next guy try to punish a mistake.

I'm not saying go and get a lineup full of Adam Dunn's. That would be awful. But when you have 1 guy hit over 20 homeruns that's absolutely pathetic. Especially in this day and age of juiced baseballs and small ballparks. It would just be nice to have that one Adam Dunn, Ryan Howard guy that could make the pitcher pay for walking a hitter or 2. Chipper is not that guy anymore. It's no surprise that for the 1st time in his career we had a winning record in the games he didn't start. I personally thought Chipper should have been dropped in the order down to 4th and put LaRoche in the 3 hole and McCann hitting behind Chipper to try to get him some more pitches to hit to see if he could have snapped out of that funk he was in. But Chipper has been and always will be expect for the 2 years we had Sheffield in the 3 hole. Maybe Heyward could be that guy I'm begging for. We are long over due to have a guy come in as a rookie and hit 25 or so homeruns.

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I would love to have Adam Dunn or Ryan Howard. They are outstanding hitters that know their strikezones, make pitchers work, and can hit the ball out of the park on anyone. Both, especially Dunn, have great OBP too, so they are contributing even when they aren't hitting the ball out of the park.

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I would love to have Adam Dunn or Ryan Howard. They are outstanding hitters that know their strikezones, make pitchers work, and can hit the ball out of the park on anyone. Both, especially Dunn, have great OBP too, so they are contributing even when they aren't hitting the ball out of the park.

Right. That's all I'm saying.

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Right. That's all I'm saying.

So are you also trying to say that Billy Beene wouldn't want Ryan Howard or Adam Dunn on the A's?

Beene's approach is about making the best team under severe budget conditions, not that "a guy who walks" is better than "a guy who hits home runs". What Beene and other smart baseball people determined was that hitters that had good OBPs, but didn't necessarily have high batting averages or great power numbers, were relatively undervalued in the marketplace, and that low-budget teams like the A's could put together a winning line-up by obtaining those sorts of players. Likewise, when drafting, it's problematic to draft guys that will demand high bonuses to sign; instead he instructed his scouts to find guys that weren't getting a lot of attention, that would sign relatively less, but would get on-base a lot.

Theo Epstein is a Beene disciple. He's also has the keys to one of the top revenue teams in baseball, and he's not afraid to spend money. He gets the best of both worlds.

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